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bluehash

STM32L4 hands-on seminar and receive a complimentary STM32L4 Discovery kit

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Via Email. Enjoy!

 

Link.

 

STM32L4 Ultra-Low-Power MCU Hands-on Seminar

Learn how the new STM32L4 80 MHz Cortex-M4 ultra-low-power MCU allows you to maximize performance and minimize power consumption in your next low-power design

Join our STM32L4 hands-on Seminar & receive a FREE STM32L4 Discovery Kit

The seminar will feature hands-on classes using the STM32CubeMX to generate and debug a range of embedded projects on the STM32L4 Discovery Board. During the session you will learn how to:

  • Use the STM32CubeMX device selection matrix, pin mapping utility, clock configuration and code-generation utilities.
  • Optimize and measure the power consumption on the STM32L4 Discovery board
  • Read data from the on-board motion MEMS sensors
  • Use the STM32L4 autonomous smart peripherals in ultra-low-power designs
  • Model various STM32L4 application power scenarios using the STM32CubeMX Power Consumption Calculator

Mark your calendars and register now. The agenda l and list of cities where the seminar will take place are detailed below.

If you have a myST account, click HERE TO REGISTER NOW.

If you do not have a myST account, click HERE TO CREATE your account & register

 

 

City

Date

Location

Atlanta

Nov 5, 2015

Infinite Energy Center
6400 Sugarloaf Parkway

Duluth, GA  30097

770-813-7500

Boston

Oct 21, 2015

Westford Regency

219 Littleton Road

Westford MA  01886

978-692-8200

Chicago

Oct 20, 2015

Chicago Marriott Northwest

4800 Hoffman Boulevard

Hoffman Estates, IL  60192

847-645-9500

Dallas

Nov 10, 2015

Doubletree

1981 North Central Expressway

Richardson, TX  75080

972-644-4000

Los Angeles

Nov 17, 2015

Marriott Warner Center

21850 Oxnard St.

Woodland Hills, CA 91367

818-887-4800

Minneapolis

Oct 22, 2015

Doubletree Bloomington

7800 Normandale BLVD

Minneapolis, MN  55439

952-835-7800

Montreal

Oct 28, 2015

https://www.hotelrubyfoos.com/en/'>Ruby Foo

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Not even near me :P God dam.

Thanks for the info bluehash! I'm really interested on the L4 series, unfortunately it's only supported by the Cube :<

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I don't understand why these companies won't / don't just do web seminars. Something accessible like youtube. Personally, I'd much rather buy my own hardware, and watch a few videos - at home. Than get a free < $20 usd board, and have to go sit in on a seminar that is probably at least a couple hours from my home. TI used to do something decent, by allowing users download their introduction videos. Now, they require flash, and that is not something I deem reasonable. If they do not want to use up their bandwidth for downloads  . . . fine, put it on youtube . . .

 

Or even just a really good write up of the hardware, and how to set it up for development.

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Not to mention they do not even have a seminar in Phoenix AZ( close-ish to where I live ) which really is inexcusable.  But I guess us hillbillies out here near Phoenix know nothing about electronics . . .

 

EDIT:

 

Sorry @@bluehash, thank you for sharing all the same. My aggravation is not targeted at you by any means. Just frustrated that these larger companies out there do not seem to "get it".

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@yyrkoon    I agree, it would be far less expensive to produce youtube videos than flying their employees to multiple locations around the country and renting expensive hotel conference rooms including refreshments and/or lunch.  Having at one time been on that side of the fence, the reason they do this is to control the sales process as well as have a captive engineering audience for half a day to a day.  If there wasn't a decent ROI for them they probably wouldn't spend the 10's of thousands it costs to do one of these tours.  All about business and large production design wins.

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@yyrkoon    I agree, it would be far less expensive to produce youtube videos than flying their employees to multiple locations around the country and renting expensive hotel conference rooms including refreshments and/or lunch.  Having at one time been on that side of the fence, the reason they do this is to control the sales process as well as have a captive engineering audience for half a day to a day.  If there wasn't a decent ROI for them they probably wouldn't spend the 10's of thousands it costs to do one of these tours.  All about business and large production design wins.

I suppose, but one thing that needs to be understood - By "them" <--- reminds me of Riddick heh. Anyhow, yeah. . .  they need to understand that they want us to use their product. So essentially, they need us, and we do not necessarily need them.

 

I'd like to learn about, and use some of the ST Micro stuff. Some of their MCU's, and dev boards seem pretty cool. However, I feel these also need to be more accessible. As I'm just a hobbyist, with less time on my hands to play with stuff like this than I want. Same for PIC, and actually PIC has been on my mind for a long time. But Microchip so far has not given me much of a reason to make the leap.

 

Ok, so what do they care about the hobbyist right ? What if their helping me learn lands me a job in a company where I have a say in which platform I / we use ? . . .

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Ok, so what do they care about the hobbyist right ? What if their helping me learn lands me a job in a company where I have a say in which platform I / we use ? . . .

Agreed. They have to be cognizant of that possibility.  And the amount that they are willing to cater to a the hobbyist marketplace obviously varies by company based on their belief that the investment will pay off in the future. TI obviously feels that it is a worthwhile endeavor to support the hobbyist market and I applaud them for it. It is certainly a different market than it was 10-20 years ago, as the lines seem much blurrier between the "professional engineer" and the "hobbyist". 

 

As an aside, Intel (and I am sure others as well, but Intel was prominent) used to donate tens (perhaps hundreds) of thousands of dollars in development equipment to university electrical engineering departments.  The obvious goal was that these students graduated very familiar with the Intel CPU products and that they would design them into products in their new jobs.

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Just for the record, the STM32L4 is preferable to the MSP432 for systems requiring ultra low noise and/or fast wakeup from deep sleep, because it has better low-power performance without the buck converter.  The MSP432 has an integrated buck converter -- so does Atmel's L0+ chip they market the hell out of (it's actually worse than both TI and ST in IoT usage).  MSP432 is better for anything that can tolerate a bit of noise from the buck DC-DC, and which can tolerate 100 us latency from deep sleep (alternatively, you can spend a bit of extra money and clever design time to shield all the I's and C's used by the buck).

 

It's an interesting time for low power embedded.  These M4 chips with crazy fast ADCs (MSP432 and STM32L4) can do a certain degree of SDR and FFT jobs on renewable power.  Very cool.

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So, was I the only one who found it very hard to watch that video ? Bad audio + heavy<insert accent> accent . . . I had to close the feed. Couldn't watch it . . .

 

EDIT:

 

On a side note. I recieved an email the other day from Atmel with a link to a video demonstrating this: http://start.atmel.com/

 

Not exactly directly related to the discussion here, but I found it interesting. I've not been an Atmel fan in the past, but things like this could change my mind. This is a link to the video:

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