Jump to content
yyrkoon

NodeMCU

Recommended Posts

So, no idea how new this "dev board" *is* but here goes.

 

Having some issues sourcing a board on ebay that is doubtless based on the ESP-12 core. So some research is required, but was just this morning sent a newsletter from http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/projects/how-to-make-an-interactive-tcp-server-nodemcu-on-the-esp8266/

 

And thought I'd relay the information to those who may not know of this.

 

@@Lgbeno I thought you might have special interest in this based on our recent discussion. Not sure how well it might fit into your plans of analog.io, but probably worth a good looking into. One thing is that it would most definitely require some tweaking. At sub $10usd though, it is probably worth the trouble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, I've looked into this.  I actually have been selling these on Tindie as well: https://www.tindie.com/products/ImpGuru/esp8266-mini-development-kit/ Price could certainly be lower but I wasn't sure how easy they would be to build.  Turns out that it is not too bad.

 

I heard from some people who purchased my kit that they had trouble witht he USB to UART chip on the NodeMCU version.  I still prefer genuine FTDI chips...

 

There is also this which is a pretty remarkable deal: https://www.tindie.com/products/AprilBrother/cactus-micro-rev2-arduino-compatible-plus-esp8266/?pt=full_prod_search

 

You're right though, this Sub $10 node market is where its at for doing a lot of fun wireless sensor projects!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard from some people who purchased my kit that they had trouble witht he USB to UART chip on the NodeMCU version.  I still prefer genuine FTDI chips...

 

 

That, I could not say either way personally. But I can say that the prolific pl2303hx are pretty solid. I've has no problems with the ~$2.35 with free shipping cable we've bought. Actually, we bought 2, both work fine.

 

Still though, wifi, adc, I2C, PWM, with 12KiB / 96KiB / 4MiB(flash)  memories for under 9 bux is nothing to turn your nose up at . . . I suppose the other ESP modules have less functionality, but one could probably build a tiny board using one to just spit data out for one peripheral to <whatever>. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah it's pretty cool. The one caveat with NodeMCU is that the Lua interpreter takes a lot of RAM. I've switched to using this: https://github.com/esp8266/Arduino

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Well most interpreted languages do not impress me. I have no experience with lua at all, and if I can help it - I never will. But I was actually wondering last night how hard it would be to do the same just using C. I mean if an interpreted language is already doing it . . .I would not mind reversing the bindings, but I would not know how honestly. That, and I know very little about the hardware. Maybe the details are in the git ? Perhaps I'll take a look sometime when I do not have my own stuff keeping me too busy with my free time.

 

EDIT,

 

Also, everyone has their likes / dislikes . . . Me, I have a strong dislike for anything involving the wiring IDE . . . Eclipse too for  that matter. Really though I've been shying away from all IDEs lately, and using gcc from the Linux command line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well most interpreted languages do not impress me. I have no experience with lua at all, and if I can help it - I never will. But I was actually wondering last night how hard it would be to do the same just using C. I mean if an interpreted language is already doing it . . .I would not mind reversing the bindings, but I would not know how honestly. That, and I know very little about the hardware. Maybe the details are in the git ? Perhaps I'll take a look sometime when I do not have my own stuff keeping me too busy with my free time.

Personally I like interpreted languages. I'll take easy to read/write code over the tangled mess that I can often get myself into with types in C. And the same time the target needs to have the resources that the interpreter is not a burden.

 

At this point I've written in so many languages, they all sort of blend together anyway. What do you mean by "reversing the bindings?"

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you mean by "reversing the bindings?"

I'm assuming the lua interpreter has bindings to C, since it is not a native language like C. But also not even really sure it would be necessary as all the code seems to be in the git ? Again, I have not looked, and probably wont for a good long time.

 

Anyway, we all use the languages we feel most comfortable with. For me, in the past I had been spending too much time with high level languages. The end result was that I was starting to feel uncomfortable in lower level languages like C, or C++. Lately, I've been sticking with pure C as perhaps it is less complex when compared to C++. I feel that I could get lost for a decade in C++ generics alone( templates ). As a result I'm hoping to understand a single lower level language better - Instead of being a "jack of all trades" - and master of none. It'll still be a while before I master C I think, but I am now substantially better at using it by forcing myself to solve all my recent problem by using C.

 

Aside from that, I'm starting to use gcc from the command line in Linux a lot more. In hopes that again, I will become more familiar with it. The side effect that I'm seeing here for myself. Is that I tend to shy away from platforms that are not easily developed using gcc . . . Because I am becoming more, and more accustomed to gcc.  Which I think is a good thing in many ways, but also has it's caveats.

 

heh, anyway I suppose a more succinct way of saying all the above is that, once you're more familiar with a language. Things that previously may have seemed not so trivial, seem to become easy / easier. So that perhaps someday, that "hammer" starts to look more and more like a Swiss army knife. Or whatever . . . Besides, C code is / can be very small, and depending on the coders ability very fast as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a side note. I do mostly like at least one interpreted language - Javascript. It has it's quirks, and for me is can be a very "ugly" language ( more than in just looks ), but when used "correctly" - It actually has some very good aspects to it. I'm a big fan of event driven programming. Probably an after effect of spending so much time using VB.NET / C#.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JS is good, it is almost like a living organism how fast and easy it is to add packages and functions. The asynchronous aspect is pretty cool too, sometimes it can get out of hand.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×