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Can I program a MSP430 using Microsoft Visual Studio?

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I have a Visual studio license and I don't like CCS and IAR very much in terms of GUI. Is it possible to use Visual Studio for programming an MSP430? Any of you have done this and thinks it's worthy?

 

I've done a very quick google search and found article below, but thought of asking here as well to hear your opinion.

http://visualgdb.com/tutorials/msp430/

 

Thanks!

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That article is the only one I've ever seen. I really like the Visual Studio UI (and I'm a C# coder by trade) but I've never tried it. If you've got time then why not give it a go and let us know.

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@@zeke ohh that's a bummer. I hadn't really looked beyond the quick google search... unfortunately I don't have any spare cash to invest in that at the moment so it seems to be a no-go.

 

@@Fred yeah, I am not a programmer but every once in a while I do some stuff in Visual Studio and I like the UI as well. For MSP430 I typically use IAR, but can't say I like it.

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I have a Visual studio license and I don't like CCS and IAR very much in terms of GUI. Is it possible to use Visual Studio for programming an MSP430? Any of you have done this and thinks it's worthy?

 

I've done a very quick google search and found article below, but thought of asking here as well to hear your opinion.

http://visualgdb.com/tutorials/msp430/

 

Thanks!

Yes you can use VIsual Studio to "program" "anything" using a related gcc toolchain( if one exists ). Probably any toolchain that is complete, and allows command line "switches", and input. To do this, you need / have to use make file projects from within Visual Studio.The main problem with VIsual studio in this context, is that it's stdout/stdin format is different. So in order to recieve proper output in the Visual Studio debug console, you need to parse / format stdout to Visual Studio's liking. It is possible, but also very complex / work intensive. Complete knowlege of Windows cmd line, batch files, etc is a must.

 

Honestly, I do not think it is worth it. The only feature I personally liked, and probably still like about Visual Studio is its definition finder. Which, you can still use, without having to make your project *in* Visual Studio. So long as Visual Studio knows where to find the defiition files.

 

Anyway, code:blocks is probably still far more flexible, and it may look ugly- But no one says you have to use code::blocks for anything other than an "automation" tool.

 

Now days, I prefer to write my code in an editor such as sublime text ( dark themes are a must for me ), and use an external development workstation ( Debian Linux ) to compile my code. External meaning: I write my code on a Windows system, which is saved to a remote filesystem shared out via Samba . . .

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If you use energia you can use visualmicro and visualstudio. If you also program for arduino you can use the same setup. I used to code for arduino using Atmel studio with the visualmicro plugin. When visualstudio started to support the visualmicro plugin I switched to that. You get a full fledged programming editor that works fine with TI boards.

 

cheers

Cor

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Since we are on the subject, has anyone tried to use IntelliJ IDEA?

Not I. Isnt that mostly for Java, and web technology languages ? I like the way the IDE looks, heck I like the way several IDEs look / can look.

 

I found out though, while on my "quest" for the perfect IDE is that I really do not need one, and for me it was sucking up way too much of my time. Then, while using the minimalist gcc command line tools. I am learning more about the toolchain, and am still learning.

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Yes, but it can be used for C development (plug-in required.)

FYI, CCS is based on Eclipse, which like IDEA, is also used mostly for Java and web development.

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Eclipse I know, the jetbeans IDE I only knew by word of mouth. Except I do remember checking it out a long time ago. Seeing that it had a pretty nice look with dark themes, but only had support for java, and a few scripting languages.

 

I'm pretty happy with sublime text though. It has 90% +  of what all those fancy IDE's have ( minus the compiler obviously ), and can be far more flexible. It can even be setup to run / build programs from source, and like VIM has a very powerful plugin / maco system.

 

But . . .thats me. I realize other people are going to like other things

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