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cubeberg

Windows IoT program

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that would depend on whether it is windows embedded, or compact embedded, if its the latter option then its a winCE kernel and bares no real relation to our windows NT based systems.

 

It wasnt a serious thought anyway, was just something that occured to me.

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I bought "Make: Getting started with the Intel Galileo" and had a quick glance. It's running Linux, GPIOs are Arduino 1.0 compatible programmed using the Arduino IDE. Example code was all .ino and one Python file, apparently setting up a simple HTTP server presenting the state of a button. Onboard flash holds Linux, micro SD crads up to 32GB are supported. It has an IOREF jumper to switch between 5V and 3V3 logic levels. There's also a jumper block to change the I2C addresses of the onboard peripherals. Book is aimed at beginners.

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@@JonnyBoats, thanks, I was afraid of this  "As a result, we will not be able to ship this initial developer kit to everyone who signs up."

 

I found out about the free Galileo here first but ended up seeing it posted later on a lot of other sites.  I was surprised that everyone was saying they got the "we will let you know when it ships" e-mail.

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The link provided in the blog post has more info about the program  http://ms-iot.github.io/content/index.htm

 

I found this interesting:

 

Software Limitations

  1. millis() rolls roughly every 50 days the application is running.
  2. strncmp() is not implemented.
  3. int represents different bit-lengths on different Arduino platforms. To guarantee a specific behavior with bitwise operations, you should cast the data to the explicit desired type using variable types from the inttypes.h header (i.e. uint8_t).
  4. analogReference() is not supported by the Galileo board. Analog inputs are scaled on a range of 0-5 volts (resulting in analog readings of 0-4095) regardless of the setting of the IOREF jumper (5v or 3.3v). However, when the IOREF jumper is set to the 3.3v position, analog input signals are only safe from 0-3.3 volts
Hardware Limitations
  1. The fastest most GPIO pins can be changed is about once every 25 milliseconds. This is because of the speed of the Cypress I/O port expander used on the Galileo. Pins 2, 3 and 10 can be driven directly by the processor and can be changed roughly every 2 milliseconds.
  2. CPU architecture does not support the LOCK_ prefix on kernel instructions.
  3. No SSE registers, Windows functionality requiring this hardware cannot work.

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Using wiring/arduino, for me that is mega unexpected. Would never have guessed them doing that in a million years.

Nicely integrated into Visual Studio from a screenshot I saw.

 

..., they probably wanted to play with Galileo

...

For Galileo equals "another platform I don't know yet".

 

I still don't get this IoT stuff. I don't see much use for it. Maybe meteorologists love to get weather data from a lot of locations...

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I still don't get this IoT stuff. I don't see much use for it. Maybe meteorologists love to get weather data from a lot of locations...

 

Isn't the point of it to make products obsolete faster so manufacturers can sell more products?

 

For example - Automated Metering (Smart meters).

A conventional electric meter (with the spinning wheel) lasts for decades - many have been in service for 40-50 years, and

there are some in this city that are still operating after 80 years.  

A smart meter (which can be remotely controlled, wireless network, own IP address, etc.) will become obsolete in maybe a decade (two if you are lucky).

To maintain security, privacy, etc. will have to replace them more frequently = more revenue for the manufacturers, etc.

 

That is just an example - same goes for thermostats, telephones, what have you.

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Isn't the point of it to make products obsolete faster so manufacturers can sell more products?

 

But you are forgetting that a smart meter could open up a world of extra features that may be of use to the consumer. Like instant updates on electricity usage, begin able to see daily graphs of electricity usage, etc.

 

It is true that manufacturers want to sell more products, but the same is true for the consumers. We want to buy these products.

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Smart meters are there entirely to suit the company that supplies them. The idea that consumers benefit is just marketing fluff. They save money on sending or someone to read the meter and they can cut off the supply remotely of you don't pay the bill.

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HI,

 

I also got one from MS ... unfortunately the IO is a lot slower than an average Arduino Uno ...

But the internet connectivity is easy to use and has plenty of space etc so I am planning to replace my arduino that acts as the middleman between the Internet and the sensors in my IOT network. I am planning to use an MSP430 (with Anaren AIR) to collect direct data (electricity, gas and water meters) and send it via serial to the Galileo. It would have been so much more impressive if they had added a dedicated unit to the Galileo that was at least as good at signal processing as an Arduino,

 

cheers

 

Cor

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