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jpnorair

Parking Sensors

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Those Honeywell sensors are cool. 

 

They are not cheap though.

 

Your product is going to be ~$200 street price.

Even with the magnetometer, COGS would be comparable or even less that that of a Fitbit One.  Secondly, I don't plan to sell this to retail/consumer markets -- assuming it works, I might sell it as a board or some form of ODM unit.  So, it should be markedly cheaper to buy, install, and service than any traditional outdoor parking sensor is today.

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Ever thought of mounting on the floor, in the middle of the parking spot? Like a cat-eye. You could embed it in clear resin and measure IR reflection on the top. You could even try these cheap not-so-sensitive magnetometers (compass) to measure for changes in magnetic field, and see if that's enough. Other idea could be to use thermopile sensor, try and sense the heat of the engine when the car arrives, but you'd have to sort out the problem of sun heat, and the gradual cooling, which later could mean that the car's temp is indistinguishable from the night's sky temp.

 

A wire loop is also not crazy difficult, but you'd need to cut through the pavement to get a big enough loop. And it won't be very inconspicuous, especially the installation :P

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Ever thought of mounting on the floor, in the middle of the parking spot? Like a cat-eye. You could embed it in clear resin and measure IR reflection on the top. You could even try these cheap not-so-sensitive magnetometers (compass) to measure for changes in magnetic field, and see if that's enough. Other idea could be to use thermopile sensor, try and sense the heat of the engine when the car arrives, but you'd have to sort out the problem of sun heat, and the gradual cooling, which later could mean that the car's temp is indistinguishable from the night's sky temp.

More good thoughts.  Part of the idea of the project is to do the sensing from the curb, though.

 

I'm not sure how useful an engine heat sensor would be.  Maybe it is worth a try.  Some cars are not made of steel and some do not have engines (in San Francisco, this is not a drop in the bucket), so magnetometers and heat sensors are generally things I'd prefer to avoid unless they are able to provide really good information.  In any case, I will add this sensor to the ones I'm going to evaluate.

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This would be cool to have so you know where all the empty spots are. Thus, you are able to park as soon as a spot opens up. Soon we will see this in smart cities. 

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This would be cool to have so you know where all the empty spots are. Thus, you are able to park as soon as a spot opens up. Soon we will see this in smart cities. 

San Francisco already has it in a bunch of places.  Just look for the white, trapezoidal boxes mounted to the ground on the spaces, and look for the pole-mounted solar powered boxes here and there.  I know that you can find these in lower-pac-heights near Fillmore.  They have been there for years.  The company is Fybr.  (fybr-tech.com)

 

I'm trying to make sure that my design is something that could eventually be put into parking meters.

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