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Hi all,

 

I'm wondering with bluehash's upcoming wiki, whether it would be useful to have a section/area/page that documented useful chips that people have used in their MSP430 projects? As I have been meandering through the forums I have come across a whole heap of useful chip references - from static ram, eeproms, smd regulators, rgb chips, temperature, humidity, etc that I think it would be worthwhile to have in stock at home for when i need them for a project.

 

Further, having references to code (Energia or not) or forum references where they were discussed might be useful. I was wondering if we should start a thread here to gather that information in preparation for the wiki?

 

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The problem with deciding on ICs to have on hand is a) variety and B ) subjectiveness.
 
The likely hood that you will suddenly need a humidity sensor "on hand" is very subjective. Same with static ram or rgb chips. Unless you do electrical engineering by trade, needing a specific IC in your stock isn't very likely.
 
And then variety, which version of which chip do you need? A 256 bit eeprom or a 1k eeprom? Go with the smaller cheaper one and get stuck with something too small, or spend more money on the bigger one then end up not using it all?
 
That is, unlike discreet parts, standard caps, resistors, leds, diodes, inductors or crystals. All of these are pretty much need to have. Maybe a port expander of your communication choice as well (i2c or spi or shift register) just as a general go to.
 
It is a great idea to have a list of ICs cross referenced to a given project/implementation though.

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Its interesting you say that, particularly your discussion around size of eeprom. I did go looking around the sram - 32k vs 64k and found them only cents in difference. So price can't be the reason for choosing one over the other, that would be worthwhile to capture in a wiki entry don't you think?

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Its interesting you say that, particularly your discussion around size of eeprom. I did go looking around the sram - 32k vs 64k and found them only cents in difference. So price can't be the reason for choosing one over the other, that would be worthwhile to capture in a wiki entry don't you think?

In my extremely limited time spent looking at EEPROMs, the larger the chip the more complicated the addressing seems to be. More pages (pages at all...) and so on.

I haven't actually used any EEPROM other than the bits built into the Arduino though, and that was done with a library.

 

The main things I suddenly need to have/use tend to be caps (I loot old PSUs. Hazardous occupation, that), inductors (PSUs again), logic level NPN and PNP MOSFETs of decent juicyness (digikey) and 555s (to drive PNP MOSFETs, or to drive non-logic level NPNs, or to generate frequency outputs), trimmers (voltmodding video cards) and that sort of stuff.

 

Chip wise it tends to just be 555/556s, everything else falls into the discreet and/or passive category.

One thing I definitely recommend stocking is extra MCUs. It's no fun to be closing in one some awesome project and then roast the brains of the operation. For Launchpad type stuff, a couple extra launchpads too. Frying the programming section of the board stops things just as dead.

 

I need to get a few shift registers, those seem like really commonly used chips. Some MOSFETs in smaller packages too, there are many times when a TO220 90 amp MOSFET is a bit excessive. (and other times when they aren't, and fry. Oops.) Plus it'd be nice to have a screwup just fry the MOSFET and not all the copper between VCC-MOSFET-GND.

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When I did my first big 'buy' of components.  I got all the basic stuff: gates (or, and, nand, nor, etc), capacitors, resistors, shift registers, etc...  The accessories (servos and whatnot) I've just gotten as needed.  They're not incredibly hard to get cheaply, though, you might end up waiting for them.

 

One component I've come to enjoy, though, is the CD4050BE.  Its a logic level translator that.  They're only like 50cents a pop from TaydaElectronics and they just work (which is always nice.)

 

A few of the accesories I've purchased:

S3003 Servo, Motors, LCD Display (Nokia 5110), TCRT5000, Accelerometer...

 

All fun things to have...

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If you are using the USB MSP430 parts, then the TPS782xx series voltage regulators are great, plus the TPD2E001 USB bus diode.  Now there is a TPS783xx, but I cannot figure out what is the difference between 782 and 783.

 

Otherwise, I find that in modern times, if you are using glue logic IC's you are most likely doing something wrong.  10 years ago, I remember using a lot of glue logic.  Now, it is easy to find serial-interfaced "smart" ICs, and 5V is a thing of the past unless you are married to AVR.  If you want to play with logic, get a CPLD/FPGA kit.  There are a bunch of cheap ones now, aimed at hobbyists.

 

As an aside, when I was a 2nd year university student I did a project that was supposed to use a CPLD entirely in 74-series logic.  It was fun, but ultimately I would not do it again (it was a "simon" game, and I think I still have the LogicWorks schematic on my HD).  Maybe everyone needs their first crazy project to understand why crazy is not always good.  For me, it is past that.

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As an aside, when I was a 2nd year university student I did a project that was supposed to use a CPLD entirely in 74-series logic.  It was fun, but ultimately I would not do it again (it was a "simon" game, and I think I still have the LogicWorks schematic on my HD).  Maybe everyone needs their first crazy project to understand why crazy is not always good.  For me, it is past that.

 

School is actually why I purchased all my old-school logic chips.  My freshman project was to design a very basic car computer (turn on headlights, wipers, etc...).  We had access to the Basic Stamp but, my partners and I decided to be awesome and do it all in 7400-series logic gates.  For what its worth, we got extra points but, yeah, not doing that again...

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For our fraternety we had this "special" clock installed which wouldn't wrap around after 24 hours (yes, 24 hours is the default digital clock in the Netherlands). Since drinking evenings more often than not went through to well past midnight we could actually say the curernt time is 25 hours on wednesday when it is actually 1 hour past midnight on thursday.

Once a year we had a marathon of one week open bar. The clock was not reset in between (since we didn't close). So at the end of the week the clock actually displays something like 130 hours (as of midnight on monday).

This clock was built with 7400 series chips a few decades ago. Would we rebuild this clock nowadays a single microcontroller would suffice. The clock's internals filled a box 5x15x20 cm.

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