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Launchpad as external programmer

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Hello guys!

 

I need help with the launchpad. I've read the datasheets and manuals but it's still not clear to me that how can I use it to program a uC for example on my breadboard. I dont want to remove it and place into launchpad every time. Can somebody please tell me which pins I have to connect to program the external chip and do i have the remove the one in the launchpad or can i program 2 at a time?

 

 

Thanks!

And greetings from Hungary :)

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Hello guys!

 

I need help with the launchpad. I've read the datasheets and manuals but it's still not clear to me that how can I use it to program a uC for example on my breadboard. I dont want to remove it and place into launchpad every time. Can somebody please tell me which pins I have to connect to program the external chip and do i have the remove the one in the launchpad or can i program 2 at a time?

 

 

Thanks!

And greetings from Hungary :)

I haven't done this myself, but it seems to me that you have to connect Vcc and GND, and also at least RST and TEST. I'm not sure about TXD (P1.1) and RXD (P1.2), as I think they're only used for UART comm with the host PC. But, it couldn't hurt to attach them, unless you're using them in your circuit.

 

The easiest way to program a chip in your breadboard from the launchpad would be to simply leave all the jumpers on at the top of the board, and connect to the proper pins of the chip on the breadboard by using jumper wires into the socket on the LaunchPad. The holes might be a bit tough to get jumpers in initially, but they'll eventually go in.

 

Hope this helps!

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I haven't done this myself, but it seems to me that you have to connect Vcc and GND, and also at least RST and TEST. I'm not sure about TXD (P1.1) and RXD (P1.2),

 

I use it this way and it works. Only need to connect the first four. see spy-bi-wire pdf for details. oh and i leave the dip socket empty. I don't know if you can do two at a time.

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The RST and TEST are the two signals you need to do programming or debugging. And you always need Vcc and Vss no matter what you do.

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And don't forget, you probably have pin 10 (RST) on the MSP430 tied high in your circuit. You'll have to "untie" that so you can reprogram the chip.

Forgot to mention that. Thanks for that, Doc!

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The RST and TEST are the two signals you need to do programming or debugging. And you always need Vcc and Vss no matter what you do.

 

You actually don't need Vcc if the chips is powered externally. More accurately, you do not want to use the Vcc of the LaunchPad if you are powering the chip externally. Two power supplies fighting ends terribly. You need the ground though in order to provide a reference for the 2 programming signals.

 

Example: For an MSP430 hooked up on a breadboard with RST tied to VCC via a resistor (47k), and powered by 2xAA batteries, you only need to connect the GND, the RST, and TEST pins in order to program the chip.

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I was continually moving the chip from launchpad to breadboard (AA battery powered) until I noticed someone else doing this. What a joy it was to discover I could program the chip in situ!

 

To play it safe, I decided to remove my AA power supply, an power from the launchpad whilst programming. As has been said, disconnect the reset resistor if you had one in your circuit, connect up power, gnd, test and reset from the launchpad to the chip, and program from there.

 

Honestly, I must have replaced my chip in the breadboard over 100 times before I discovered this method! So annoying when all you want to do is change a delay value!

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For those who have not studied their launchpad schematic and PCB, this photo will be rather illustrative:

 

post-2338-135135499994_thumb.jpg

 

This photo is not mine, and was posted by someone (I forget who) on the #43oh IRC channel.

 

My version is not nearly so pretty, as I hacked the female headers that came with the Launchpad, but it gets the job done just fine.

 

Remember, you will want to keep those jumper leads as short as possible to avoid errors programming the chip on your breadboard.

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Is there anything inherently incorrect in attaching wires to the uC slot itself, as below? I have a jumper header or two (in the pic) salvaged from a computer PSU, but they're not particularly nice to use with a breadboard.

 

img021small.jpg

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