Jump to content
mbeals

Help me pick linux flavor

Recommended Posts

I just ordered a new laptop (should be here in about a week), and I need to choose which flavor of linux I'm going to put on it. I've been running Ubuntu since 2006 or so mainly because it was the most laptop hardware friendly at the time. However, it has become too bloated and 'user friendly' for my taste, so I'm contemplating a more streamlined offering.

 

I'm seriously considering biting the bullet and going with Gentoo or Arch, but I don't know if I have a free weekend to devote to compiling an entire OS from source. I've also been looking at crunchbang, since I am already super familiar with debian.

 

Anyone have any words of wisdom?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not so much words of wisdom as my own noob and superficial linux experiences. always wanted to like ubuntu but have rarely got on with it, mainly due to older esoteric hardware issues but also as i'm always nervy of distros touching my hard drive and/or messing with the mbr as i'm quite happy with my current windows installation. i like to run from a separate usb drive without a grub on the internal.

 

have recently been playing with the latest ubuntu with a little more success due to hardware upgrade but know where you are coming from with the bloated comment.

 

i quite like puppy: http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=70855 as a noob can mess with it without fear of buggering up the entire installation or pooter as you boot into and run from ram, referencing a save file for system changes. have considered remastering a small and portable msp430/microcontroller ready iso but have yet to find the time.

 

maybe try a few different distros on for size: http://www.linuxliveusb.com/en/supported-linuxes

 

will be following this thread with interest as i'd like to explore linux further and become more comfortable with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As soon as i get it,I'm going to wipe the drive and install linux. I don't plan on running windows at all unless i absolutely have to. You also shouldn't be too worried about borking the mbr. Grub2 is really easy to work with and repair....I've broken and fixed quite a few systems...there are a lot of good guides online.

 

I actually have puppy linux on a usb stick. It's in my "oh sh**" toolkit. It's my goto for rescuing unbootable systems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@all: explain it to me like i'm five. why do you like what you like about your choice of linux and how did you find the installation and learning curve experience/period of adjustment from a windows user/linux noob perspective?

 

@mbeals: i'm curious as to why you never settle on puppy yet use it. i ask because i use it in a similar way - it has been my most positive linux experience to date yet i find myself reluctant to settle on it and am still looking for a more day to day, permanent alternative. i think i may have commitment issues. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ubuntu with gnome panel : large repository of software, ease of installation, it's my goto distro (at this time)

 

what i dont like : unity....

 

openSuse : stable and well rounded. also no unity.

 

debian : stable works on almost anything I have.

 

lfs/blfs (linux from scratch) : challenging, custom, runs on anything, no unity.

on the downside, one missed command and you bork your system and you have to start over.

fyi this is not for every one but will give you major nerd cred.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started out with Open Suse, fedora and open BSD on school machines, but when I was time to install on my own machine, I chose Ubuntu because it was quick and easy, and at the time, one of the only distros that worked well with laptop hardware and the Intel wireless chipsets out of the box.

 

I never considered puppy as a primary because it was designed to be more of a live CD type distro. E.G. you have to take special steps to not run as root.

 

I think I might start with crunchbang, since I know I can get it running quickly, then try and install arch or gentoo into a VM in my spare time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to stay with Ubuntu, therer are lighter variants: Xubuntu and Lubuntu. And you get a different DE, if you dislike the one Ubuntu gives you.

 

I have used Xfce with FreeBSD for many years now, so when I needed Linux (I got a laptop that I couldn't get working with Xfce / Xorg in FreeBSD because of driver problems), Xubuntu was my easy choice. I like Xubuntu because (like Ubuntu) it is easy to get installed, easy to find answers, and it works most of the time.

 

But since I was already experienced with a unix-type operating system (FreeBSD) I didn't have the typical Windows -> Linux learning experience. Linux is a bit different from FreeBSD, so there was a learning experience.

 

In general, I find learning something valuable; it is not a waste of my time.

YMMV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...