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meanpc

How does TI feel about Energia?

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The Texas Instuments launchpad strategy is to promote the knowledge and use of the MSP430 value line of microcontrollers in new applications.

Energia will promote the use of LaunchPads but will prevent the majority of users from going deep in the microcontroller capabilities.

Energia, like the Arduino IDE (and the whole ecosystem), put in the hands of general public the use of microcontrollers to do

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:) You will be surprised by the answer.

 

So, this makes it sound like you know the answer?

 

On one hand, I figure TI is 100% behind Energia. It's hard for me to find the motivation for people that know how to write code for the MSP-430 to open the microcontroller up to 'non-engineers' for seemingly no gain. So maybe Energia is funded and driven by TI? I don't know the developers of Energia, so this may be way off base.

 

On the other hand, like SeuPay said, there really isn't any money in the hobby market. The money comes when an engineer brings a product to market and orders 1,000,000 micros to build the widgets. But, if you get younger people using your products before they become engineers, will that mean sales when they are engineers later?

 

The launchpad marketing strategy has confused me - it looks as though it's aimed at the hobbyist with the low price point and booster packs. You get to the TI site, and quickly realize it's an engineers only kinda place.

 

For the record, I love TI. They've sent me some cool stuff and been very responsive to questions I've had. They do seem indecisive on their marketing strategy though.

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:) You will be surprised by the answer.

 

So, this makes it sound like you know the answer?

 

On one hand, I figure TI is 100% behind Energia. It's hard for me to find the motivation for people that know how to write code for the MSP-430 to open the microcontroller up to 'non-engineers' for seemingly no gain. So maybe Energia is funded and driven by TI? I don't know the developers of Energia, so this may be way off base.

 

On the other hand, like SeuPay said, there really isn't any money in the hobby market. The money comes when an engineer brings a product to market and orders 1,000,000 micros to build the widgets. But, if you get younger people using your products before they become engineers, will that mean sales when they are engineers later?

 

The launchpad marketing strategy has confused me - it looks as though it's aimed at the hobbyist with the low price point and booster packs. You get to the TI site, and quickly realize it's an engineers only kinda place.

 

For the record, I love TI. They've sent me some cool stuff and been very responsive to questions I've had. They do seem indecisive on their marketing strategy though.

I've had the same observations as you about the LaunchPad marketing ... I suspect it's the mindset & culture of an engineering corporation hamstringing them from properly designing the online material around hobbyists. Arduino got its start from a few hobbyists/tinkerers, and its no-frills website/references/etc. show. TI's employees are coming from a totally different culture & viewpoint. I trust they'll figure it out eventually, but if not, its up to folks like us (and forums like this...) to keep the torch going.

 

Frankly, I like the chip enough to feel it's worth it. But it took a rather deliberate effort on my part to discover what it's all about.

 

I'm also very much in the same position (but much less far along) with my Renesas RX demo board I got for free last month--Renesas's materials are definitely designed for professionals, and while their GNU tools exist I'm told there's some code incompatibilities (pragma's are different, etc) with a lot of Renesas' application notes.

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During the end of 2010 there was a shortage of ATMEGA328 in DIP package, The Arduino Team creates a SMT version of the Arduino UNO to overcome it. They ask Atmel for more than 100K DIP chips and they becomes interested in the Arduino.

Atmel is making money with the Arduinos and will continue doing so because the clones and because Arduino is becoming a commodity.

Texas is not making money producing LaunchPads, it

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