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How to solder this?


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Ok i did it over the holidays! Filled the solder iron with all new batteries and the soldering is much better. Also applied some a little tin on the pcb as advised. The first attempt was a disaster th

You could liquefy the rosin with some isopropyl alcohol in a small bottle.   Use a Q-tip to dispense it.

Clean it with alcohol and/or use flux.

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Gordon you are right, it is rosin (i look up the word on google and it translate exactly to what it reads on the packing), and it is not in cream as i said before, it is quite solid. (the way it is packaged and the Chinese word on it made me think it's cream like :lol: ) There are no more markings elsewhere so the only thing i know about it is rosin.

 

So.. rosin can be used as flux? I watched some video on youtube demonstrating soldering, and there's always a gelly/oily transparant paint on the PCB, that's the flux? Btw, some of those video showing soldering SMD part like magic (one pass with a flat tip :o ), and there is no solder wire.. are they using "solder paste"?

 

Zeke: thank you for the recommendations! The gear looks very good and professional and i thought they gonna be expensive but after knowing the price it is affordable to me, perhaps for a holiday gift for myself next month ;)

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Yes, rosin can be used as flux. The liquid ones are easier to clean after soldering (especially the no-clean kind :)), but I guess for what you are doing now a bit of a leftover isn't going to matter much (and you still can treat it with isopropyl alcohol after, though I'm not sure if isopropyl alcohol actually dissolves rosin). However, do not solder crystals with flux you can not completely clean.

 

The gelly/oily transparent stuff is flux too. "Flux" is a generic term for a cleaning agent the actual chemical composition of which depends on what you are using it for -- if you are soldering aluminium or stainless steel, God-knows-what acid is used as flux that would melt your electronics gear as well as your work bench faster than you could say "Ni!". The oily/gelly kind is just a different kind of flux.

 

Solder paste is small solder balls in flux, so if what you are referring to looks grey-ish, it is solder paste. If it is translucent, it might very well be that they are using the solder already on the tip to do the magic :).

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Yes, rosin can be used as flux. The liquid ones are easier to clean after soldering (especially the no-clean kind :)), but I guess for what you are doing now a bit of a leftover isn't going to matter much (and you still can treat it with isopropyl alcohol after, though I'm not sure if isopropyl alcohol actually dissolves rosin). However, do not solder crystals with flux you can not completely clean.

 

The gelly/oily transparent stuff is flux too. "Flux" is a generic term for a cleaning agent the actual chemical composition of which depends on what you are using it for -- if you are soldering aluminium or stainless steel, God-knows-what acid is used as flux that would melt your electronics gear as well as your work bench faster than you could say "Ni!". The oily/gelly kind is just a different kind of flux.

 

Solder paste is small solder balls in flux, so if what you are referring to looks grey-ish, it is solder paste. If it is translucent, it might very well be that they are using the solder already on the tip to do the magic :).

 

Thank you so much for a lesson, I learn alot!

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there is a "mechanic's" solder on dealextreme for less than $5 delivered, it works great for SMT and other tiny apps, but also for larger stuff. I have tried it in the toaster oven and with the iron with great results. Just ordered a second bottle, as the first dried up after about 6 months ( in the fridge, triple wrapped..)

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there is a "mechanic's" solder on dealextreme for less than $5 delivered, it works great for SMT and other tiny apps, but also for larger stuff. I have tried it in the toaster oven and with the iron with great results. Just ordered a second bottle, as the first dried up after about 6 months ( in the fridge, triple wrapped..)

 

Just add isopropyl alcohol and it will liquefy again. Easy Peasy.

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Ok i did it over the holidays! Filled the solder iron with all new batteries and the soldering is much better. Also applied some a little tin on the pcb as advised. The first attempt was a disaster though :o I tried too fast and soldered all ten points in one go, and the end result is only one point works and all others probably short circuit. My bad techniques!

Started with another one, and this time be extra careful and tested after each solder.

Thanks everyone!
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That's a pretty cool switch. Good job!

 

BTW, I just took another look at the photos in the first post. To my eyes, it looks like there's some sort of coating on top of the gold plating. It could be some sort of pcb water proofing.

 

Can you confirm that or am I going blind?

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That's a pretty cool switch. Good job!

 

BTW, I just took another look at the photos in the first post. To my eyes, it looks like there's some sort of coating on top of the gold plating. It could be some sort of pcb water proofing.

 

Can you confirm that or am I going blind?

 

Yes there is a coating, its surface is not like normal PCB (flat and smooth) but looks like sand paper under an angled light source. Putting a finger on it can actually feel that surface is a little rugged:

 

post-2970-135135531021_thumb.jpg

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I bet that's an organic coating like shellac. It doesn't look like any conformal coating I know.

 

Oh my! That might even be Linseed Oil! It's a waterproof coating made from Flax seed. It's commonly used to waterproof wooden boats. It's also the oil in oil based paints.

 

I bet isopropyl alcohol would wipe that right off.

 

By the way, it looks like they dipped the whole board in that stuff.

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