Jump to content
munny

Microphone MSP430F5438A

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I am planning to analyze breathing pattern using a microphone. I have MSP430F5438A Experimental board. I found that the board itself has a microphone. I am looking for any documentation available about how to use the microphone from the board. I did a little bit of research but didn't find details other than the user guide for the board. I appreciate any recommendation.

 

Thanks,

Row  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A quick google search of "msp430 microphone" doesn't yield much, but there are examples for recording and playback with the msp430FG4618.

What type of analysis??? Your intended study appears to be very broad in its potential scope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't decided yet.  I just read a paper where the respiration rate is calculated with speech recording. That's why thinking if I can utilize the microphone from the board I have. Thanks for your response. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Using a mic could be a challenge.  In the hospital respiratory rates are generally followed by tracking muscle electrical activity.  Of course, with either approach, there is a lot of "noise" to deal with.  EKG leads (which are often used to track the RR for someone not on a ventilator) are triggered by movement, such as turning, brushing teeth, etc.  With audio, first you need a mic that's sensitive enough to even detect inspiration/expiration and then you have to figure out how to discriminate from the background. 

Based on your comment, I assume this is intended to be basically "real time?"

Out of curiosity, I googled "detect human respiratory rate" and saw RGB-D camera to determine changes in the chest wall, radar, IR-sensors, paired electrode capacitance, and, perhaps the paper you read. I note in that article: "Some of the major assumptions include recording the breaths in a low-noise intensity environment." (my emphasis) Further, they're running Matlab on a reasonably powerful laptop.

Also, in that paper, the author states the use of a "standard microphone."  I have no idea what "standard" means - it's not a term used in recording. Mics are both interesting and complex devices when it comes to selecting one. (I do some voice over work, and have direct experience with those challenges).  FWIW, you might take a look at Dave Jones' video blog. At least one of his interviews focuses on the challenges associated with circuits used to amplify audio signals.

Regardless of your equipment choices, you have a very interesting, challenging project.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would suggest moving the audio electronics to a separate breadboard. You will have complete control of the front end: microphone selection, gain, filtering, etc. There are essentially two choices of microphones for breadboarding: condenser electret and MEMS. Sparkfun and Adafruit make breakout boards for both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, NurseBob said:

Using a mic could be a challenge.  In the hospital respiratory rates are generally followed by tracking muscle electrical activity.  Of course, with either approach, there is a lot of "noise" to deal with.  EKG leads (which are often used to track the RR for someone not on a ventilator) are triggered by movement, such as turning, brushing teeth, etc.  With audio, first you need a mic that's sensitive enough to even detect inspiration/expiration and then you have to figure out how to discriminate from the background. 

Based on your comment, I assume this is intended to be basically "real time?"

Out of curiosity, I googled "detect human respiratory rate" and saw RGB-D camera to determine changes in the chest wall, radar, IR-sensors, paired electrode capacitance, and, perhaps the paper you read. I note in that article: "Some of the major assumptions include recording the breaths in a low-noise intensity environment." (my emphasis) Further, they're running Matlab on a reasonably powerful laptop.

Also, in that paper, the author states the use of a "standard microphone."  I have no idea what "standard" means - it's not a term used in recording. Mics are both interesting and complex devices when it comes to selecting one. (I do some voice over work, and have direct experience with those challenges).  FWIW, you might take a look at Dave Jones' video blog. At least one of his interviews focuses on the challenges associated with circuits used to amplify audio signals.

Regardless of your equipment choices, you have a very interesting, challenging project.

 

I really appreciate your time for the writing. It's very informative. Yes, you are correct about the MIC choice. I actually haven't think about that details still regarding the practical challenges. Especially with my system  (Has other sensors in it), it will be very challenging.  For data processing, I am dealing with MATLAB also. I'll follow the blog you referred also for getting further idea. 

Thanks a lot.   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mph said:

I would suggest moving the audio electronics to a separate breadboard. You will have complete control of the front end: microphone selection, gain, filtering, etc. There are essentially two choices of microphones for breadboarding: condenser electret and MEMS. Spark fun and Adafruit’s make breakout boards for both.

Yes, I looked for the separate MIC options. And yes you are right Spark fun and Adafruit has their breakout boards. I'll probably go for those for my project. 

Thanks for your response. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×