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Free STM32F4 discovery kit in US/Canada


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Maybe Im of a different breed then most beginners but I like knowing why the chip is doing what its doing, or why a certain piece of code does what it does, not just digitalwrite and now the led is blinking.

 

If this is your goal, then you definitely want to prefer the MSP430 over ARM. And if you don't already know C, then you might even be better just starting with assembly.

 

I have been doing C on the MSP430 for about six months now, and while I have been wanting to do some ASM work, I have been put off by the complexity of the current MSP430 assembly manual. I just stumbled across a much older version which is far easier to read, as well as a much smaller and simpler assembler -- naken430asm (http://www.mikekohn.net/micro/naken430a ... embler.php)

 

The MSP430 instruction set is *very* similar the the PDP-11 instruction set, often regarded as the quintessential CISC instruction set, and still used to teach assembly language programming in many college courses despite the fact that very few PDP-11s are still in use. (I have noticed that some colleges have shifted to the MSP430, likely due to it's similarity to the PDP-11.)

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http://hackaday.com/2011/10/17/how-to-d ... k+a+Day%29   This article may be of interest to some.

Here's a start. I'm using Ubuntu 11.10 (just released) and it appears that the Universe repository already has an ARM package available for GCC 4.6.   sudo apt-get install gcc-arm-linux-gnueabi

STM32F4 discovery kit giveaway  

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The MSP430 instruction set is *very* similar the the PDP-11 instruction set, often regarded as the quintessential CISC instruction set, and still used to teach assembly language programming in many college courses despite the fact that very few PDP-11s are still in use. (I have noticed that some colleges have shifted to the MSP430, likely due to it's similarity to the PDP-11.)

 

We did ASM exclusively in college (no higher-level languages), but at the time it was 68HC11. There weren't nearly as many inexpensive tools available as there are today. 68HC11 was still the "industry standard" at that time, along with 8051 and its derivatives.

 

I wish that we had MSP430 then. The architecture was around, but it wasn't very widely used.

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Has anyone tried to install the STM32F4 firmware/demo files and bring them up in the Attolic IDE? I'm having a devil of a time trying to figure out the instructions in the UM1467 Getting started with software and firmware environments for the STM32F4DISCOVERY Kit manual.

 

Any help would be appreciated.

 

TIA, Mike

 

I just loaded mine up and had some trouble - did you try opening the project from STM32F4-Discovery_FW_V1.0.1\Project\Demonstration\TrueSTUDIO? If you just have it import from the root - it identifies projects for the other IDE's. I haven't tried to update the board, but I could at least build once I opened the correct project.

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It seems to "import" something from STM32F4-Discovery_FW_V1.0.1\Project\Demonstration\TrueSTUDIO, as can be seen from the screen shot, but I can't quite figure out where the example project is and I also get the path errors shown.

 

I'm using a Laptop with the Win7 Home Premium OS.

 

I've only ever used manufacturer's IDE's which included any libraries in the IDE. Does this Atollic IDE have STM32F4 libraries? Does the STMicro "example" stuff also include libraries? If so, do I need to merge these somehow?

 

I'm lost and I would be very thankful for any help...

post-1059-135135519201_thumb.png

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I'm on linux at the moment so I don't remember the specifics, however you have to create a linked resource variable CurPath or something. The instructions are in the startup doc.

 

-rick

 

Speaking of Linux... I'm getting weird errors trying to compile the current git version of Texane stlink, where it was fine a week ago. Lots of undefined reference problems with libusb-1. It *appears* okay. Anyone else having the same problem?

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Speaking of Linux... I'm getting weird errors trying to compile the current git version of Texane stlink, where it was fine a week ago. Lots of undefined reference problems with libusb-1. It *appears* okay. Anyone else having the same problem?

 

Seems like this is a problem for ubuntu 11.10 users only. I was able to compile successfully by changing the link order in all the Makefiles:

 

LDFLAGS=-L. -lstlink -lusb-1.0

 

-rick

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I realized today that this device may help me out, as it has SDIO/MMC capability. I was hoping to use a TI product, but I have spent much time this morning and ended up with nothing besides the OMAP dev board which is like 2,000$US. Does anyone know of any other TI MCU that will accomplish this. I am dreading to start learning another brand...

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Does anyone know of any other TI MCU that will accomplish this.

 

I'm not sure what size SD/MMC card you are trying to support, however the FatFs Generic FAT File System Module might work on one of the msp430s that have > than 1k of RAM. You might look at the generic version of the code to get started. You can find more info here: http://elm-chan.org/fsw/ff/00index_e.html

 

-rick

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Thanks Rick,

 

What I am actually trying to do is get a MCU to communicate with a WiFi module in an attempt to broadcast the data over 802.11. The module I picked, and it may be a mistake, uses a SDIO connection to the host. It also has I2C and SBW connections, but they share pins with other ports. Your post did point me to an interesting fact that SDIO cards can be accessed using SPI, and this may be the ticket . Most of my efforts are focused on "dumbing down" technology to make it more affordable and specific to some simple sensor/control concepts that would be benefited by wireless nets. KB

 

Reading this I am a little hurt to call the MSP a "cheap" MCU, I will admit it is inexpensive ;)

 

 

from: http://elm-chan.org/docs/mmc/mmc_e.html

SPI Mode

 

This document describes the protocol to control MMC/SDCs in SPI mode. The SPI mode is an alternative operating mode that defined to use the MMC/SDCs without native host interface. The communication protocol for the SPI mode is simple compared to its native operating mode. The MMC/SDC can be attached to the most microcontrollers via a generic SPI interface or GPIO ports. Therefore the SPI mode is suitable for low cost embedded applications. Especialy, there is no reason to attempt to use native mode with a cheap microcontroller that has no native host interface. For the SDC, the SPI mode 0 is defined for its SPI mode. For the MMC, it is not the SPI timing, both latch and shift actions are defined with rising edge of the SCLK, but it seems work in SPI mode 0 in SPI mode. Thus the SPI Mode 0 (CPHA=0, CPOL=0) is the proper setting for MMC/SDC interface, but SPI mode 3 also works as well in most case.

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