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Found 5 results

  1. raging

    NUFR port to MSP430

    I created an open-source RTOS called "NUFR" and I'm wanting to port it to the MSP430. So, first I'm advertising NUFR and second I'm soliciting advice for the port. NUFR is a small but nevertheless full-featured RTOS. It is ideal for the 430, that's why I'm porting it there. It already runs on the Cortex M's. Here's some approximate resource consumption numbers on the M3 /M4: - the NUFR kernel and services layers consume around 4-6k of flash. Basically, that's all the features turned on. - RAM consumption: Around 300 bytes of kernel and messaging overhead; Add for each task: TCB of around 50 bytes and task stack. ARM examples ran minimum of 150 bytes up to 500 bytes per task. Lots of variables to consider, mind you. Each semaphore is around 24 bytes. And there's a networking stack (RNET) that runs on NUFR. RNET is UDP over IPv4 or IPv6. Current L2 support is for PPP. ICMP echo requests (pings) supported. NUFR supports two packet buffer management schemes, and can squeeze a networking stack into a small RAM footprint (mind you, there's a tradeoff between RAM consumption and CPU usage, and packet MTU has a large impact on small RAM footprint systems). A key feature of NUFR is that it's mainly event driven (though doesn't have to be). This becomes important on larger codebases on battery-powered systems. NUFR also does its best to stay out of the way. A lot of RTOSs don't do that. NUFR doesn't take ownership of the interrupt vector table or anything like that. You pick your favorite BSP, etc. and NUFR will work with it. NUFR is flexible, adaptable, and as straightforward as possible. It's documented too. https://bitbucket.org/burnwood/raging-release/src/default/ That's my advertisement. Onto the solicitation for advice. I'm looking for recommendations on compilers to support. My plan was to support msg430-gcc. Raging uses all free/open-source tools. But I'm looking to get an easy path on a 430 port, since I only have a few hours of 430 knowledge. What's the best toolchain? Development platform? Is there a software emulation I can run, like QEMU? I'm planning on supporting the 16-bit variant of the 430, is that sufficient for a first pass, and do a 20-bit version later? Which do you think is better to do first, the 16-bit or 20-bit--or can I do both easily? I started the port, some of the 430 files are on Bitbucket. The port code is very early, hopefully there's enough for someone to tie all the pieces together. Anyone want to help out with this? Bernie
  2. I just stumbled upon DeviceHive. I am now wondering if anyone else out there has noticed it. Does anyone have any opinions on it?
  3. I've just started a project "Sensorless BLDC Motor Controller: Modular System" on Kickstarter. It is open source hardware/firmware project. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/946939931/sensorless-bldc-motor-controller-modular-system Event driven finite state machines (FSM) approach was used for this sensorless BLDC motor controller firmware. The programming language is C and there is no operating system. It was implemented by myself from scratch based on the well known motor control, other algorithms and the firmware is a totally open source product. What the implemented firmware can do? Uses a 31.25 kHz symmetric PWM scheme to better detect BEMF zero crossing 12-bit ADC configured as a window comparator makes more error prone zero crossing detection, especially on a start Initial Position Detection (IPD) algorithm was implemented based on Variable Inductance Sensing Method A rotor revolving direction can be changed any time on a fly, that can be used for "reverse braking" Safety stop when a motor stalled Motor speed control (start, stop, up, down, duty cycle %) and obtaining a real time telemetric data (speed, voltage current) using serial UART interface configured for 460800 bps Motor speed control using standard 1...2 ms PPM of remote control (RC) devices I hope it can help an engineering community. Thanks.
  4. We have developed hardware, open source firmware and a web app, which will allow very rapid creation of IoT applications, aimed at beginners and experts alike. We use a Wi-Fi master, paired with ISM slaves, to allow greater battery life and range for the slaves (though masters can be used on their own). A complete security infrastructure is in place, and a personalised web app is created on set-up. Or you can extend our code, point to your own server or use our API to build your own web or desktop application. Our master is based on CC3100 + MSP5969 + CC110L. We currently supply slaves based on the CC430 and made by PanStamp. Please take a look at www.wifithing.com and our kickstarter campaign. If you want a third party view of what we are trying to do, this article covers it well: SemiAccurate Or look at the blog posted about us on energia.nu. Edward
  5. I'm trying to set up an eclipse / gcc / gdb / mspdebug based development environment to work on a custom msp430 based board that the company I work for produce. I have set up eclipse with the tools which come with ubuntu 15.04, and it's almost working apart from a weird bug in the debugger. When you watch a local variable in the main function, eclipse displays an incorrect value. This bug has been around for a while, as I've noticed it before (see this and the following page: http://forum.43oh.com/topic/1419-eclipse-plugin-for-mspdebug-and-msp430-gcc/page-3). The bug has been fixed in the most recent version of mspgcc from the old sourceforge site, but this is 2 years out of date now, and the development has moved to a project hosted by texas instruments: http://www.ti.com/tool/msp430-gcc-opensource . I would like to use the most recent version from ti if possible; I've tried compiling it and it builds OK, but I can't find a compatible libc and set of device specific header files which will work with it. When I try to use the libc that comes with ubuntu, it says it's incompatible. Also, when I pass the flag '-mmcu=msp430f5510', which used to work before, msp430-gcc throws an error. I've also noticed that the msp430 support appears to have been merged back into the upstream mspgcc (and presumably the other gnu tools), which is another way I've thought of going. So my question is, given all this, what's the best way to go to set up an up to date open source toolchain for the msp430? I could just compile the most recent version from the old sourceforge project, but would rather use something more up to date if that is possible.
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