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mgh

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  1. Like
    mgh got a reaction from energia in Error during download   
    I don't know that any of these ideas will help, it's just what I looked at when I tried to see what the problem might be.
    When you first start the Boards Manager, do you see the message "Downloading platforms index..."?  It gets the small file http://www.energia.nu/pacakges/package_index.json .  If you can see that, then it's talking to the package server OK. I've got a slow dial-up connection, so it sits there long enough for me to read it (and wait a little, too!). If you have a fast connection then it might blip past in an instant.
    It's interesting that it wants to get a 1.0.2 release, when there's a 1.0.3 release up on the site.
    Have you made any changes in Preferences / Network? If so, could they be blocking something?
  2. Like
    mgh got a reaction from krishnat in How to start with TIVA C lauchPad   
    I have TivaWare SW-EK-TM4C123GXL-2.1.2.111 unpacked on my system.
    I know there are more recent versions.   It includes a 'doc' directory with many PDFs, like SW-TM4C-EXAMPLES-UG-2.1.2.111 which is the TivaWare Examples User Guide.   The examples themselves are under "examples/peripherals/"   There are many sample projects under the "examples/boards/ek-tm4c123gxl" directory, too.   It takes awhile to get used to where everything is and how it works, but it's not difficult.
  3. Like
    mgh got a reaction from yyrkoon in Logic Analyzers   
    I'm late to this party, but here's two other suggestions:
     
    Ika-logic has a 4-channel semi-kit for 39 euros:
      https://www.ikalogic.com/scanalogic-2-edu-kit-2/   Mattair-Tech has a multi-tool for 23USD:   https://www.mattairtech.com/index.php/development-boards/zeptoprog-ii.html    No affiliation with either company, but I do have a very nice ATxmega128a3u board from MattairTech, and I wish I had the ScanaLogic device.
  4. Like
    mgh got a reaction from energia in Errors compiling in Energia   
    The errors are pretty much what they say they are - 
      sinewave.cpp.elf section `.bss' will not fit in region `ram' - something is too big to fit in RAM.
      region `ram' overflowed by 1114 bytes - and that is how much it is too big.
     
    This is your bits array:
    int  bits[100][8]={}; How much space does that take up?  One 'int' is maybe 32-bits (yes?), so that's 4 bytes for one entry. Multiply by 800, to get 3200 bytes total. Find out what processor you are using and look-up how much RAM it actually has.  Maybe only 2K?
     
    EDIT: I forgot to tell you how to fix this! SImply change the type from 'int' to 'char' or 'byte'. Instead of storing a single bit in a 32-bit value, we'll store it in a 8-bit value. This is still quite wasteful, but that should reduce the memory usage by a factor of 4. 
     
    Also, there might be a problem in the three tests like this one:
    else if((sina[i]/16) > 1/2) That "1/2" is converted to "0" by the compiler. It is not a floating-point computation.
     
    Also, aren't all of your "sina[]" tests basically the same thing? I haven't thought deeply about this, but it seems to me that if "X/2 > 4", then "X/4 > 2" will also hold, and the same with "X/8 >1", and so on down the line.
     
    Finally, you say that 'sina' is a number from 0 to 8.  OK, then dividing by anything bigger than 8 will give you zero. This is integer arithmetic, not floating-point.
     
    PS: the code that creates "sina" and builds "bits" can be moved out of "loop" and into "setup". You don't even need the "sin" array, actually.
     
    Good luck!
  5. Like
    mgh got a reaction from Fmilburn in Errors compiling in Energia   
    The errors are pretty much what they say they are - 
      sinewave.cpp.elf section `.bss' will not fit in region `ram' - something is too big to fit in RAM.
      region `ram' overflowed by 1114 bytes - and that is how much it is too big.
     
    This is your bits array:
    int  bits[100][8]={}; How much space does that take up?  One 'int' is maybe 32-bits (yes?), so that's 4 bytes for one entry. Multiply by 800, to get 3200 bytes total. Find out what processor you are using and look-up how much RAM it actually has.  Maybe only 2K?
     
    EDIT: I forgot to tell you how to fix this! SImply change the type from 'int' to 'char' or 'byte'. Instead of storing a single bit in a 32-bit value, we'll store it in a 8-bit value. This is still quite wasteful, but that should reduce the memory usage by a factor of 4. 
     
    Also, there might be a problem in the three tests like this one:
    else if((sina[i]/16) > 1/2) That "1/2" is converted to "0" by the compiler. It is not a floating-point computation.
     
    Also, aren't all of your "sina[]" tests basically the same thing? I haven't thought deeply about this, but it seems to me that if "X/2 > 4", then "X/4 > 2" will also hold, and the same with "X/8 >1", and so on down the line.
     
    Finally, you say that 'sina' is a number from 0 to 8.  OK, then dividing by anything bigger than 8 will give you zero. This is integer arithmetic, not floating-point.
     
    PS: the code that creates "sina" and builds "bits" can be moved out of "loop" and into "setup". You don't even need the "sin" array, actually.
     
    Good luck!
  6. Like
    mgh reacted to L.R.A in [Energia Library] Time_Capture   
    So I made a API to help use the Tiva time capture mode with the timers. So I decided to port it to Energia.

    For now it only works with the wide timers.
    I will try in the future when I have more time to get more info on it.
    But for now I will leave this notes:
    The possible pins to use are PC4, PC5, PC6, PC7 and from PD0 to PD7, including making a total of 12 inputs. Unlike pulseIn() you can't simply use any pin. 
    The functions need to know the pin as parameter. The parameter should be for example "PC4" and not "PC_4".
    There are functions to get the direct reading, the reading in nanoseconds (precision of 12.5ns) and reading in microseconds (precision 1us). 
    There are functions with timeouts also.
    There are also non-blocking functions. An examples shows how to use them.
    The time from when the functions are called to the time the end of the pulse should be less than 53 seconds. Like pulseIn() it waits for the pulse to rise (in positive pulse readings) or fall (in negative pulse readings) and then measures the time it takes to change back.

    I hope it helps some peeps
    Time_Capture.rar <- V1.0
    Time_Capture_V2.0.rar <- V2.0 fixed problem described here
     
  7. Like
    mgh got a reaction from gsutton in Enlarging size of Energia as displayed on PC screen   
    You're very welcome!  Enjoy!
  8. Like
    mgh got a reaction from gsutton in Enlarging size of Energia as displayed on PC screen   
    I'm not sure which items you mean when you say "... but the displayed items are way too small".
    The Energia preferences lets you set the editor font and size.
    On the preferences panel it also shows you the location of the preferences text file preferences.txt.
    In there are settings for the font, the default window size and position, and some colors (I hate the bright red).
    For example:
     
      editor.window.height.default=600   editor.window.width.default=500  
      On OS X, it looks like the application icons are under Energia.app/Contents/Resources/Java/lib/theme and settings for the GUI fonts and colors are in the file Energia.app/Contents/Resources/Java/lib/theme/theme.txt   I'm not sure where it will be on Windows. (And yay! now I can tone down that bright red!)
  9. Like
    mgh got a reaction from morelius21 in Assembler nop in ccs   
    This link might help:
    https://e2e.ti.com/support/development_tools/compiler/f/343/t/56276
     
    Short answer:  asm("  nop");
  10. Like
    mgh reacted to luligar in Tiva TM4C GPIO pins with "two logic-high states"   
    Hi mgh,
     
    It is indeed an amazing board, specially for the price! Shortly before your reply, I was sifting through these forums and I saw a thread about the 0 Ohm resistors you mentioned. I went back to the flyer and they show the pin pairs that are shorted in the signals diagram, but the resistors themselves, as R9, R10, were not mentioned. Sure enough, I took them out and one of my boards had its PD1 pin taken out , I guess after I tried using the stronger current drivers . On my second board, to my surprise, all 4 pins were fine!
     
    I don't see how to close an issue, if that is even intented in this forum. But I consider it closed and solved. Thanks for your quick and kind reply!
     
    Regards,
    Luis
  11. Like
    mgh got a reaction from luligar in Tiva TM4C GPIO pins with "two logic-high states"   
    It's a great little board, isn't it!  :-)
     
    In the little flyer that came with the board, on the spread that shows the header pin functions, you'll find that PD0 and PB6 are connected together. Similarly, PD1 and PB7 are also connected together. It's my understanding that this was done for backward compatibility with the older 43oh booster boards (or something like that). So, we can't drive both pins of those pairs at the same time.
     
    The user guide for the board is spmu296.pdf, full title "Tiva C Series TM4C123G LaunchPad Evaluation Board User's Guide".
    The schematic is in the back, and shows those pins connected together.
     
    Valvano's site has a video showing the removal of the two zero-ohm resistors; it was easy to do.
    This is his video link page:  http://users.ece.utexas.edu/%7Evalvano/Volume1/E-Book/VideoLinks.htm
    Here's one link http://youtu.be/MWIX7wgS9PM
    And the other: https://s3.amazonaws.com/edx-course-videos/ut-embedsys/UTXUT601T114-G018400_100.mp4
     
    Have fun!
  12. Like
    mgh got a reaction from bluehash in Tiva TM4C GPIO pins with "two logic-high states"   
    It's a great little board, isn't it!  :-)
     
    In the little flyer that came with the board, on the spread that shows the header pin functions, you'll find that PD0 and PB6 are connected together. Similarly, PD1 and PB7 are also connected together. It's my understanding that this was done for backward compatibility with the older 43oh booster boards (or something like that). So, we can't drive both pins of those pairs at the same time.
     
    The user guide for the board is spmu296.pdf, full title "Tiva C Series TM4C123G LaunchPad Evaluation Board User's Guide".
    The schematic is in the back, and shows those pins connected together.
     
    Valvano's site has a video showing the removal of the two zero-ohm resistors; it was easy to do.
    This is his video link page:  http://users.ece.utexas.edu/%7Evalvano/Volume1/E-Book/VideoLinks.htm
    Here's one link http://youtu.be/MWIX7wgS9PM
    And the other: https://s3.amazonaws.com/edx-course-videos/ut-embedsys/UTXUT601T114-G018400_100.mp4
     
    Have fun!
  13. Like
    mgh got a reaction from tripwire in Tiva TM4C GPIO pins with "two logic-high states"   
    It's a great little board, isn't it!  :-)
     
    In the little flyer that came with the board, on the spread that shows the header pin functions, you'll find that PD0 and PB6 are connected together. Similarly, PD1 and PB7 are also connected together. It's my understanding that this was done for backward compatibility with the older 43oh booster boards (or something like that). So, we can't drive both pins of those pairs at the same time.
     
    The user guide for the board is spmu296.pdf, full title "Tiva C Series TM4C123G LaunchPad Evaluation Board User's Guide".
    The schematic is in the back, and shows those pins connected together.
     
    Valvano's site has a video showing the removal of the two zero-ohm resistors; it was easy to do.
    This is his video link page:  http://users.ece.utexas.edu/%7Evalvano/Volume1/E-Book/VideoLinks.htm
    Here's one link http://youtu.be/MWIX7wgS9PM
    And the other: https://s3.amazonaws.com/edx-course-videos/ut-embedsys/UTXUT601T114-G018400_100.mp4
     
    Have fun!
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