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emdarcher

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  1. Like
    emdarcher got a reaction from bluehash in Garden_automation_and_sensor_network   
    Here is my current project and entry for the Hackaday Prize:
    http://hackaday.io/project/2375-Garden_automation_and_sensor_network
     
    The main purpose originally was to have temperature monitoring of a small outdoor greenhouse, but then I decided to expand it from there. For more info look into the project page via the link above.
     
    Description originally from my hackaday projects page:
     
        This is a project to create a small network of sensors in the garden, and possibly some automation. The sensor data will be logged on an embedded Linux server (probably a Raspberry Pi or BeagleBone) and displayed on a web page. One such application for use is within a greenhouse, which may need to monitored in case it gets too hot for the plants, then venting of air could be automated, or the web page could alert the gardener. The nodes will consist of various sensors (temp, Humidity, soil moisture, etc.) attached to MSP430 microcontrollers which communicate using nRF24L01+ 2.4GHz tranceivers. Some will have Solar panels and rechargable batteries and others may have just a 3V button cell, but will last long by using the low power capabilies of the MSP430 and nRF24L01+.
     
    Final code github repository (for code when done):
    https://github.com/emdarcher/Garden_automation_and_sensor_network
     
    Prototyping code location on github:
    https://github.com/emdarcher/msp430-nrf24l01-testing/tree/master/sensor_comm
     
    YouTube video explaining the system (required for Hackaday Prize entry):

     
    Here is a pic of a prototype node, using internal temperature sensor and calibration data, as well as a HS1101 relative humidity sensor circuit with 555 timer.


     
    Prototype node and receiving launchpad to the left:

     
    Simplified diagram of Greenhouse node:

     
    Here is the system diagram:

     
     
  2. Like
    emdarcher got a reaction from Automate in Garden_automation_and_sensor_network   
    Here is my current project and entry for the Hackaday Prize:
    http://hackaday.io/project/2375-Garden_automation_and_sensor_network
     
    The main purpose originally was to have temperature monitoring of a small outdoor greenhouse, but then I decided to expand it from there. For more info look into the project page via the link above.
     
    Description originally from my hackaday projects page:
     
        This is a project to create a small network of sensors in the garden, and possibly some automation. The sensor data will be logged on an embedded Linux server (probably a Raspberry Pi or BeagleBone) and displayed on a web page. One such application for use is within a greenhouse, which may need to monitored in case it gets too hot for the plants, then venting of air could be automated, or the web page could alert the gardener. The nodes will consist of various sensors (temp, Humidity, soil moisture, etc.) attached to MSP430 microcontrollers which communicate using nRF24L01+ 2.4GHz tranceivers. Some will have Solar panels and rechargable batteries and others may have just a 3V button cell, but will last long by using the low power capabilies of the MSP430 and nRF24L01+.
     
    Final code github repository (for code when done):
    https://github.com/emdarcher/Garden_automation_and_sensor_network
     
    Prototyping code location on github:
    https://github.com/emdarcher/msp430-nrf24l01-testing/tree/master/sensor_comm
     
    YouTube video explaining the system (required for Hackaday Prize entry):

     
    Here is a pic of a prototype node, using internal temperature sensor and calibration data, as well as a HS1101 relative humidity sensor circuit with 555 timer.


     
    Prototype node and receiving launchpad to the left:

     
    Simplified diagram of Greenhouse node:

     
    Here is the system diagram:

     
     
  3. Like
    emdarcher got a reaction from bluehash in My MSP430 based analog test bed.   
    This is a project I made while I was learning about the MSP430's ADC10 peripheral and messing with multiplexing of 7-segment LED displays. It is a test bed for analog sensors where the 10-bit value of the analog input on the MSP430 mcu ( a MSP430G2252 in this case ) is displayed on two 2-digit 7-segment displays, which are being driven via a TPIC6B595N Power Shift register ( the SPI is currently bit-banged ). This has come quite handy for testing sensors quickly for my robotics projects and such.
     
    Here is my blog post that goes into the project in detail:
    http://emdinventor-blog.tk/msp430-based-analog-test-bed/
     
    Github repository that contains the code for this project:
    https://github.com/emdarcher/msp430-7seg-mux1
     
    pictures of the result:

     

     

  4. Like
    emdarcher got a reaction from Rei Vilo in Light Seeker robot with MSP430   
    @@zlalanne
     
    The l293d part needs a minimum of 4.5v on the datasheet , so i am supplying it with power straight from the 4-5 AA NiMH batteries to get 4.8 - 6V. The L293D was very picky and would stop working if under 4.5V ( battery strain with only 4 cells ), but as for the control logic, the 3.3V HIGH signals from the msp430 worked fine for the logic inputs on the L293D.
  5. Like
    emdarcher got a reaction from zlalanne in Light Seeker robot with MSP430   
    Recently finished my first msp430 based robot, a Basic Light seeker!
     
    This was a project to get me to learn more about the MSP430 microcontroller. In this project specifically, using multiple ADC inputs and PWMs ( 2 PWMs was a little tricky on the MSP430G2452 but eventually got it ).
     
    The robot turns according to the difference between the light values on the left and right, using two Photoresistors/LDRs.
     
    The robot is powered my a set of 4 to 5 NiMH 1.2-1.4V batteries which directly power the l293d Motor Driver IC and DC motors, and is also fed into a LP2950-33 3.3V LDO to provide regulated power to the MSP430G2452 IC and Photoresistors/LDRs. Most of my robot designs use a separate power supply for control and motors for stability, but this one has been fine so far and has an abundance of filtering caps.
     
    For a better description look at my blog post here:
    http://emdinventor-blog.tk/light-seeker-robot-with-msp430/
     
    and for the code look at my github repository for the robot's code here:
    https://github.com/emdarcher/msp430_tank_robot
     
    Some pictures of the robot:

     

     

     
    Fritzing diagram ( missing 0.1uF filtering cap across Vcc and GND on the mcu ):
     

     
     
  6. Like
    emdarcher got a reaction from oPossum in Light Seeker robot with MSP430   
    Recently finished my first msp430 based robot, a Basic Light seeker!
     
    This was a project to get me to learn more about the MSP430 microcontroller. In this project specifically, using multiple ADC inputs and PWMs ( 2 PWMs was a little tricky on the MSP430G2452 but eventually got it ).
     
    The robot turns according to the difference between the light values on the left and right, using two Photoresistors/LDRs.
     
    The robot is powered my a set of 4 to 5 NiMH 1.2-1.4V batteries which directly power the l293d Motor Driver IC and DC motors, and is also fed into a LP2950-33 3.3V LDO to provide regulated power to the MSP430G2452 IC and Photoresistors/LDRs. Most of my robot designs use a separate power supply for control and motors for stability, but this one has been fine so far and has an abundance of filtering caps.
     
    For a better description look at my blog post here:
    http://emdinventor-blog.tk/light-seeker-robot-with-msp430/
     
    and for the code look at my github repository for the robot's code here:
    https://github.com/emdarcher/msp430_tank_robot
     
    Some pictures of the robot:

     

     

     
    Fritzing diagram ( missing 0.1uF filtering cap across Vcc and GND on the mcu ):
     

     
     
  7. Like
    emdarcher got a reaction from dubnet in Light Seeker robot with MSP430   
    Recently finished my first msp430 based robot, a Basic Light seeker!
     
    This was a project to get me to learn more about the MSP430 microcontroller. In this project specifically, using multiple ADC inputs and PWMs ( 2 PWMs was a little tricky on the MSP430G2452 but eventually got it ).
     
    The robot turns according to the difference between the light values on the left and right, using two Photoresistors/LDRs.
     
    The robot is powered my a set of 4 to 5 NiMH 1.2-1.4V batteries which directly power the l293d Motor Driver IC and DC motors, and is also fed into a LP2950-33 3.3V LDO to provide regulated power to the MSP430G2452 IC and Photoresistors/LDRs. Most of my robot designs use a separate power supply for control and motors for stability, but this one has been fine so far and has an abundance of filtering caps.
     
    For a better description look at my blog post here:
    http://emdinventor-blog.tk/light-seeker-robot-with-msp430/
     
    and for the code look at my github repository for the robot's code here:
    https://github.com/emdarcher/msp430_tank_robot
     
    Some pictures of the robot:

     

     

     
    Fritzing diagram ( missing 0.1uF filtering cap across Vcc and GND on the mcu ):
     

     
     
  8. Like
    emdarcher reacted to jpnorair in Hi from San Francisco!   
    I'm wikipedia-ing.  Your high school's previous location (before 1962, it seems) is very close to where I live.
     
    I'm not actually "from SF," but I do live here.  I have few secrets: I'm ~33 years old and I'm an electrical engineer.  I'm not much of a "maker" because it's my job to make things, so I don't have too many projects worth posting online.
     
    If you want a piece of advice, I think you should program MSPs in assembly.  Anything you do now is mostly for the learning experience.  All the top EEs I know have a firm command of computer architecture and optimization even if they don't really do computer stuff.  Eventually you will find yourself in a computer architecture class, and the assembly experience will be worth something.  In the professional world, understanding the ISA will make your C better, anyway.
  9. Like
    emdarcher got a reaction from JonnyBoats in My MSP430 based analog test bed.   
    This is a project I made while I was learning about the MSP430's ADC10 peripheral and messing with multiplexing of 7-segment LED displays. It is a test bed for analog sensors where the 10-bit value of the analog input on the MSP430 mcu ( a MSP430G2252 in this case ) is displayed on two 2-digit 7-segment displays, which are being driven via a TPIC6B595N Power Shift register ( the SPI is currently bit-banged ). This has come quite handy for testing sensors quickly for my robotics projects and such.
     
    Here is my blog post that goes into the project in detail:
    http://emdinventor-blog.tk/msp430-based-analog-test-bed/
     
    Github repository that contains the code for this project:
    https://github.com/emdarcher/msp430-7seg-mux1
     
    pictures of the result:

     

     

  10. Like
    emdarcher reacted to SixSixSevenSeven in Would anyone be interested in a "BreadPad" and/or small 3.3V LDO board?   
    the little 3.3v module I am kinda interested in, looks perfect for my setup (and well, most breadboards in general). The breadboardable MSP430, not so much I must say, its not that its a bad board (it isn't) but I do have my own plans for a small form factor MSP430 board and on a breadboard I am perfectly happy with a regular MSP430 DIP, otherwise it does look like a nice small form factor MSP430 breakout.
  11. Like
    emdarcher reacted to dubnet in Would anyone be interested in a "BreadPad" and/or small 3.3V LDO board?   
    Perhaps some of the other 430 varients that aren't available in DIP would be more desirable (e.g 2955, 5529).
  12. Like
    emdarcher reacted to Fred in Would anyone be interested in a "BreadPad" and/or small 3.3V LDO board?   
    Isn't the DIP format MSP430 already breadboard friendly? I'm not sure the PCB really adds enough that there would be much demand for them. It's great that you're getting started on your own PCBs and I'd encourage you to get some made for your own use. I'm not sure they'd be a great seller though. I hope that's useful feedback.
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