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vin43

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  1. Like
    vin43 reacted to jazz in What is the significance of Boot Strap Loader in MSP430?   
    There is Open Source Release section on wiki MSP Debug Stack linked page, that will lead you to TI open source slac460 MSP430 DLL. It contains PC side and micro side for TI FET's, so everything you want to know is there.
  2. Like
    vin43 reacted to roadrunner84 in What is the significance of Boot Strap Loader in MSP430?   
    @@spirilis I think they actually pioneered cheap FETs with their ezFET line. Those were USB sticks with a tiny (1x1cm) breakout board for the microcontroller in them. Those cost about 40 euros/dollars. They have since been superseded by the launchpad and the MSP430G valueline series.
    The original ezFET connector is still available on the launchpad as a 0.05" pitch connector just next to the jumper array.
  3. Like
    vin43 reacted to dylek in MSP430 Bootloader   
    Hi All !
    I am new in this forum so firstly I would like to say Hello
     
    About half year a go I was looking for MSP430 Bootloader for value line like MSP340G2553, unfortunately I was not able to find anything.
    Now when I entered this forum I see that there ware some works around this topic.
     
    Nevertheless I would like to share with you my MSP430 Bootloader which I was able to do from scratch using TI datasheets.
    It is not fully tested yet, but with simple "Hello world " program it works.
     
    Detailed description and svn repository you can find on my WIKI here:
    https://daniel.duchna.pl/index.php/Msp430_bootloader
     
    Please feel free to test it and any comments are welcome. 
    You can post here or add comments on my WIKI (after registration)
  4. Like
    vin43 reacted to Rickta59 in What is the significance of Boot Strap Loader in MSP430?   
    I guess I shouldn't say it isn't really needed.  There might be a case for using it. There are some msp430 chips that allow you to replace the TI provided BSL firmware with your own custom bootloader.  Say you wanted to update the firmware using SPI reading the data from an SD card.  The chip has a framework in place that would allow you to do just about anything you want.
     
    For a firmware developer the easiest way to program the chip is with the launchpad. However, If you want to provide firmware updates in the field to customers then using USB BSL bootloading ( not serial as I mentioned ) as @@chicken suggested might be a great option.
     
    -rick
  5. Like
    vin43 reacted to spirilis in What is the significance of Boot Strap Loader in MSP430?   
    Cheap FETs are a very recent thing, I suspect TI pioneered that with the launchpad (since I see STM and maybe others are doing it now too), but even so the hardware to implement your own FET in a final consumer-facing product is probably more expensive than the hardware to implement BSL updates in-the-field.
  6. Like
    vin43 reacted to Rickta59 in What is the significance of Boot Strap Loader in MSP430?   
    Actually a good read that goes into the ins and outs of BSL is Travis Goodspeed's presentation at the CCC:
     
    http://events.ccc.de/congress/2008/Fahrplan/attachments/1191_goodspeed_25c3_bslc.pdf
     
    The video presentation:
     

     
    -rick
  7. Like
    vin43 reacted to roadrunner84 in What is the significance of Boot Strap Loader in MSP430?   
    @@vin43 SBW is essentially a "multiplexed" version of JTAG, proprietary to TI. This saves pins.
    JTAG is an industry standard protocol for stepping in between memory elements and logic. So you can either test the logic hardware with it, or write data in memory with it. As a result, it happens to be usable as a programming protocol.
  8. Like
    vin43 reacted to jazz in What is the significance of Boot Strap Loader in MSP430?   
    BSL is covered by slau319 MSP430 Programming Via the Bootstrap Loader, and SBW / JTAG is covered by slau320 MSP430 Programming Via the JTAG Interface. As already mention BSL request some simple / cheap glue logic, with simple PC software side. SBW / JTAG need master device, and it is more expensive for sure than BSL implementation. In general, SBW / JTAG is used for developement, and BSL is used for firmware updates on finished product. With open SBW / JTAG access device is unprotected, and there is software / hardware JTAG fuse for disabling SBW / JTAG. With blown JTAG fuse, BSL is used for simple firmware updates on customer side. With 2xx devices there is ROM BSL, while with F5xx/6xx family devices BSL is stored in flash and full customization is possible. For example, my CDC BSL has AES.
  9. Like
    vin43 reacted to chicken in What is the significance of Boot Strap Loader in MSP430?   
    For MCUs with USB (e.g. MSP430F5529) the BSL allows to program new widgets without additional hardware and wires. Plug it into a PC, run a command line tool and you're done.
     
    I use that method to program and update my AIS receiver project.
  10. Like
    vin43 reacted to Rickta59 in What is the significance of Boot Strap Loader in MSP430?   
    In a not too distant past FET programmers cost hundreds of dollars.  Customers didn't want to spend thousands of dollars to program multiple devices in a production environment so a popular option was boot loading.  All you need to use BSL is a serial connection and a host computer to burn your firmware on the chip.  BSL is just for erasing, loading and verifying the flash memory. It provides none of the other features you get with Spy-Bi-Wire or 4 wire JTAG.
     
    So do you need it ? No, not really in this day where you can get a full featured programmer / debugger in the form of low cost launchpads that include it.
    Do you need it to calibrate? No, depending on the chip it may inadvertently wipe out your calibration values.
     
    -rick
  11. Like
    vin43 reacted to chicken in confusing clock settings (DCOCTL) of MSP430G2553   
    There's a chart with frequency ranges for DCO / RSEL settings on page 278 in the family user guide: http://www.ti.com/lit/ug/slau144j/slau144j.pdf
    A table with actual numbers was probably omitted due to the large variability of the internal oscillator.
     
    As far as I understand it, MODx basically allows to smooth out the frequency steps you see in that chart, i.e. gradually push up the frequency set by DCO to just under DCO+1 for MODx = 31. E.g. MODx=16 will set the frequency at half-way between two DCO steps.
     
    Taking the calibrated 1MHz as an example:
    DCO=5 (101), MOD=28 (11100), RSEL=6 (0110)
    Looking at the chart, DCO=5 and RSEL=6 brings us into the 1MHz ballpark, and I guess MODx was used to tweak that value during calibration.
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