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KatiePier

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  1. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from gsutton in programming a MSP430G2955?   
    Hi kendalls,
     
    Sorry for all of the frustration this has caused. I thought I might be able to provide some useful information for others trying to use G2955 in the future and an update on some of the topics in this old thread.
     
    The MSP-EXP430F5529LP launchpad has a newer redesigned emulation than the MSP-EXP430G2 Launchpad, and this is why this works for your setup. For reference, the G2 launchpad emulation section is usually called "eZ-430" and the new one on the F5529 is "eZ-FET Lite". Now, the reason the G2xx5 support was not added in later on G2 is because there is not a good way built in on that emulator to be able to reliably update the firmware - please see Dietmar's comments in these e2e threads concerning these topics: http://e2e.ti.com/support/microcontrollers/msp430/f/166/p/255422/900180.aspx#900180 http://e2e.ti.com/support/microcontrollers/msp430/f/166/p/254008/897717.aspx#897717 The G2xx Launchpad wasn't really designed to be used with other devices or to be updateable, and unfortunately G2955 came out later (and can't fit in launchpad board).
     
    However in that second post you can see where Dietmar mentions that the "next generation on-board emulator will be update-able and support all MSP430 devices" - this is the eZ-FET lite that he was referring to, which is now available on the F5529 Launchpad. So F5529 Launchpad supports most MSP430s (basically all SBW devices) including G2955 - you can see this on this wiki page as well: http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/EZ-FET_lite and in the F5529 Launchpad user's guide http://www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slau533 p. 25 section 2.5. This is what we are using on new boards going forward, as you can see this is true on the new FR5969 Launchpad as well: http://www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slau535 section 2.6.
     
    And then of course as always the FET tool can also be used to program all MSP430 variants, and has additional features (adjustable voltage level, 4-wire JTAG as well as SBW, faster programming, etc). One more note - there is a target development board available for G2955 as well: http://www.ti.com/tool/msp-ts430da38 though of course you can make your own board too.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  2. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from bluehash in programming a MSP430G2955?   
    Hi kendalls,
     
    Sorry for all of the frustration this has caused. I thought I might be able to provide some useful information for others trying to use G2955 in the future and an update on some of the topics in this old thread.
     
    The MSP-EXP430F5529LP launchpad has a newer redesigned emulation than the MSP-EXP430G2 Launchpad, and this is why this works for your setup. For reference, the G2 launchpad emulation section is usually called "eZ-430" and the new one on the F5529 is "eZ-FET Lite". Now, the reason the G2xx5 support was not added in later on G2 is because there is not a good way built in on that emulator to be able to reliably update the firmware - please see Dietmar's comments in these e2e threads concerning these topics: http://e2e.ti.com/support/microcontrollers/msp430/f/166/p/255422/900180.aspx#900180 http://e2e.ti.com/support/microcontrollers/msp430/f/166/p/254008/897717.aspx#897717 The G2xx Launchpad wasn't really designed to be used with other devices or to be updateable, and unfortunately G2955 came out later (and can't fit in launchpad board).
     
    However in that second post you can see where Dietmar mentions that the "next generation on-board emulator will be update-able and support all MSP430 devices" - this is the eZ-FET lite that he was referring to, which is now available on the F5529 Launchpad. So F5529 Launchpad supports most MSP430s (basically all SBW devices) including G2955 - you can see this on this wiki page as well: http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/EZ-FET_lite and in the F5529 Launchpad user's guide http://www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slau533 p. 25 section 2.5. This is what we are using on new boards going forward, as you can see this is true on the new FR5969 Launchpad as well: http://www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slau535 section 2.6.
     
    And then of course as always the FET tool can also be used to program all MSP430 variants, and has additional features (adjustable voltage level, 4-wire JTAG as well as SBW, faster programming, etc). One more note - there is a target development board available for G2955 as well: http://www.ti.com/tool/msp-ts430da38 though of course you can make your own board too.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  3. Like
    KatiePier reacted to GeekDoc in Giveaways are fun, only...   
    How about a running reward idea?  User who gets the most "Thanks" each month gets a prize!
  4. Like
    KatiePier reacted to chicken in Products using MSP430   
    MSP430F5435A and CC2560 in the remote control of the new Amazon Fire TV

    http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Amazon+Fire+TV+Teardown/23856#s61356
  5. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from energia in Problem Programming MSP430G2 Rev. 1.4   
    Hi guys,
     
    Thanks for pointing this out. Just as an FYI we've gotten the wiki page back up now: http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/MSP430_LaunchPad_Firmware_Update
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  6. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from bluehash in Problem Programming MSP430G2 Rev. 1.4   
    Hi guys,
     
    Thanks for pointing this out. Just as an FYI we've gotten the wiki page back up now: http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/MSP430_LaunchPad_Firmware_Update
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  7. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from bluehash in Teaching Launchpad to Children   
    Oh man I wish I had noticed this thread earlier - I actually just backed this kickstarter that just ended this morning: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2105764235/rekam-dr1-smartphone-programmable-car-program-on-t/comments I already have another version of the same system (same boosterpack basically but without all the car parts) and am using it with a group of girls that I am mentoring who have never programmed before at all (it's the Young Women in Science and Engineering program mentioned on the kickstarter page).
     
    With that system there's only like 6 commands (get put etc on different pin #'s), and an interpreter already programmed on the launchpad handles responding to these by setting up the appropriate pins etc. Everything gets received by the launchpad over bluetooth from a phone (that part is basically abstracted to the kids, they just type up a program on the phone and send it over). And on the phone side, you can use the Laughton BASIC! app to send these commands over bluetooth from an Android phone. The BASIC! app also has functions to help you do things on the phone side really simply (like text-to-speech and stuff - pretty cool). This is great if you are just trying to make a cool project really fast and get the kids something they can quickly see actually do something in the physical world. Also in my experience kids seem to like anything that uses a smart phone :-) I think there's other similar kickstarters and projects out there geared at kids too.
     
    If your son is already using CCS, he may be beyond needing it at this abstracted of a level already though! I would probably start a kid off with Energia just because it will still abstract a bit of the hardware/register-level stuff though. Then if he wants more of a challenge later you can always start going to the next level later by digging into what's going on under the hood in Energia, looking at the underlying Energia libraries.
     
    BTW, if you use CCSv6 (the beta is available right now) it has Energia support built in I think - this really helps because you could still use all of the CCS debugging tools to help you view what's going on in more detail if you are having an issue.
     
    Best of luck, and love to hear this kind of story! You will have to post it on the forum if you two make something neat. :-)
     
    -Katie
  8. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from tripwire in How to define a pin in Code composer studio   
    Hi @@morelius21,
     
    CCS doesn't really use the PxOUTbit.PxOUT format - I actually do not see many people use this format even with IAR because I think it is a bit inefficient if you want to set up a whole port at once.
     
    Instead I usually do something like this:
    P1OUT |= BIT0; //to set the bit or
    P1OUT &= ~BIT0; //to clear the bit If I want to make a mnemonic to make this easier to read what pins go with what functions on my board, I would do something like this:
    #define LCD_OUT   P1OUT #define LCD_4     BIT0 Then you can use statements like these, which will evaluate the same as the code I put before:
    LCD_OUT |= LCD_4; //set the bit LCD_OUT &= ~LCD_4; //clear the bit What's nice about using these kind of operations is that you can set or clear multiple bits at once too:
    #define LCD_OUT   P1OUT #define LCD_4     BIT0 #define LCD_5     BIT1 ... LCD_OUT |= LCD_4 + LCD_5; LCD_OUT &= ~(LCD_4 + LCD_5); There are a whole bunch of other ways you can do this too - it's all personal preference really.
    Hope this gives you some ideas!
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  9. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from spirilis in How to define a pin in Code composer studio   
    Hi @@morelius21,
     
    CCS doesn't really use the PxOUTbit.PxOUT format - I actually do not see many people use this format even with IAR because I think it is a bit inefficient if you want to set up a whole port at once.
     
    Instead I usually do something like this:
    P1OUT |= BIT0; //to set the bit or
    P1OUT &= ~BIT0; //to clear the bit If I want to make a mnemonic to make this easier to read what pins go with what functions on my board, I would do something like this:
    #define LCD_OUT   P1OUT #define LCD_4     BIT0 Then you can use statements like these, which will evaluate the same as the code I put before:
    LCD_OUT |= LCD_4; //set the bit LCD_OUT &= ~LCD_4; //clear the bit What's nice about using these kind of operations is that you can set or clear multiple bits at once too:
    #define LCD_OUT   P1OUT #define LCD_4     BIT0 #define LCD_5     BIT1 ... LCD_OUT |= LCD_4 + LCD_5; LCD_OUT &= ~(LCD_4 + LCD_5); There are a whole bunch of other ways you can do this too - it's all personal preference really.
    Hope this gives you some ideas!
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  10. Like
    KatiePier reacted to rockets4kids in Teaching Launchpad to Children   
    If you son is comfortable with CCS, let him use it.  Some children raised on computers are not intimidated by a screen full of buttons and menus.
     
    However, be aware that CCS and Energia differ in more than their interface.  Energia uses a library that abstracts away much of the details of the hardware, making it much easier to use for beginners.  But again, so long as your son isn't getting frustrated, let him stay with CCS.
     
    Learning how to program microcontrollers natively (that is, without an abstraction layer like Energia/Arduino) is not intrinsically difficult, but sadly there is very little documentation aimed at absolute beginners.
     
    One book I do highly recommend for anyone really wanting to get into computers is "CODE: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software" by Charles Petzold.  (http://www.charlespetzold.com/code/)
  11. Like
    KatiePier reacted to D^2 in Problem Programming MSP430G2 Rev. 1.4   
    It's been a couple of years since I touched that page, so I don't remember exactly which version of the updater was on that page. While I'm still tracking down the history of the deleted page, here's a local version from my computer that y'all can try out. Unfortunately Windows only.
  12. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from enl in Interrupts from Timer CCR1   
    Not quite - it does actually clear the single TBxCCRn flag that corresponds to the value currently in TBxIV (the highest priority interrupt), as well as clearing TBxIV and setting it to the next priority pending interrupt, but it only does this when your code actually reads out the register TBxIV, not just as soon as the ISR is entered.
     
    You can observe this happening by adding a _no_operation(); before your switch inside your ISR, and put a breakpoint there. Open the register view in your debugger and take note of the state of the CCIFG bits in the TBxCCTLn registers, and the value in TBxIV. You'll see that the CCIFG and TBxIV values are still set on entry to the ISR. Now, single step over the switch statement (where it reads TBxIV) and you'll see that this is the time when the TBxIV and the CCIFG value are cleared. But since your switch is what read TBxIV, it already has the value to jump to the correct case.
     
    I think the easiest way to understand it is probably to run it on a part and step through it and watch what the flags and registers do.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  13. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from Rickta59 in Interrupts from Timer CCR1   
    Not quite - it does actually clear the single TBxCCRn flag that corresponds to the value currently in TBxIV (the highest priority interrupt), as well as clearing TBxIV and setting it to the next priority pending interrupt, but it only does this when your code actually reads out the register TBxIV, not just as soon as the ISR is entered.
     
    You can observe this happening by adding a _no_operation(); before your switch inside your ISR, and put a breakpoint there. Open the register view in your debugger and take note of the state of the CCIFG bits in the TBxCCTLn registers, and the value in TBxIV. You'll see that the CCIFG and TBxIV values are still set on entry to the ISR. Now, single step over the switch statement (where it reads TBxIV) and you'll see that this is the time when the TBxIV and the CCIFG value are cleared. But since your switch is what read TBxIV, it already has the value to jump to the correct case.
     
    I think the easiest way to understand it is probably to run it on a part and step through it and watch what the flags and registers do.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  14. Like
    KatiePier reacted to spirilis in Mailbag   
    Got a DLP Design NFC/RFID boosterpack from the POTM gifts. Excited to play around soon and see what it's capable of! Also need to look for RFID tags & see how much it is to get a bunch.
     

  15. Like
    KatiePier reacted to glitovsky in New Tool for Code Composer and MSP430   
    Hi Everyone,
     
    We'd like to announce a new tool we've developed for those using MSP430 with Code Composer Studio called
    CCS Map analyzer:  http://www.argenox.com/products/ccsmapanalyzer/
     
    This tool is completely free and currently supports Windows XP/7 and potentially Windows 8 (yet to be tested).
     
    We've released it since we were constantly being asked by customers about Flash and RAM utilization during development and for years
    we've seen the lack of tools that make it easy to provide this information.
    You can quickly see the routines that are taking the most space in Flash, instead of manually parsing the MAP file.
    We know of a few issues that wer'e currently working to fix, but we would love to have feedback from the community, as well
    as some more documentation.
     
    Feel free to download and share with us any issues, comments or new features by dropping us an e-mail at support[at]argenox(dot)com
     
    Regards,
    Argenox Team
     
     
  16. Like
    KatiePier reacted to greeeg in Mailbag   
    Got my Wolverine samples and launchpad
    Were shipped 3 days apart, but arrived on the same day

    Ironically I ordered the samples the day before the launchpad was released, and I plan on using them with a sharp memory LCD. I guess no one can have a truly unique idea anymore :$
  17. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from KwaiChang in External crystal load capacitance   
    Hi @@mbeals!
     
    The effective load capacitance (1pf) value is really the impact on the effective load, the impact that is coming from the 2pF that is on each pin - so the two notes are really describing the same thing. Basically, there's 2pF on each pin, which is 1pF when taken as a whole for the crystal (it's how the value comes out depending on which side of the equation you put it on - on the side where you are plugging in per-pin values, or the side where you're getting your effective load capacitance).
     
    If you haven't seen it yet, a good resource is the MSP430 32kHz crystal oscillators app note: www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slaa322
    Section 2.1 includes an example of how to calculate your required capacitance. If you use this equation, the Cparasitic is referring to the per pin (2pF) value, so that's what you'd plug in.
     
  18. Like
    KatiePier reacted to ILAMtitan in 3D printed G2LP and 5529LP bumpers/cases   
    I was able to extract the cover from Garrett's STL file and extend it a bit to fit the TRF-7970 NFC BoosterPack.  I added 6mm to it as you can see here:
     

     
    It should be able to fit with many other Boosters as well, but I haven't really tested it out.
     

     
    It sits only a few mm off of the Booster PCB so that the NFC tag is close to it.
     

     
    And here's the file for you guys to play with. 7970_5529Top.zip
  19. Like
    KatiePier reacted to D^2 in 3D printed G2LP and 5529LP bumpers/cases   
    Courtesy of @@ILAMtitan running the new 3-D printer in our lab. The case turns out pretty good. As you can see, we're already thinking about extending this to enclose LP + a BoosterPack. The one shown here is an NFC one, maybe a display one as well. Let's wait for @@ILAMtitan to work his 3-D design magic.   
     

  20. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from mbeals in External crystal load capacitance   
    Hi @@mbeals!
     
    The effective load capacitance (1pf) value is really the impact on the effective load, the impact that is coming from the 2pF that is on each pin - so the two notes are really describing the same thing. Basically, there's 2pF on each pin, which is 1pF when taken as a whole for the crystal (it's how the value comes out depending on which side of the equation you put it on - on the side where you are plugging in per-pin values, or the side where you're getting your effective load capacitance).
     
    If you haven't seen it yet, a good resource is the MSP430 32kHz crystal oscillators app note: www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slaa322
    Section 2.1 includes an example of how to calculate your required capacitance. If you use this equation, the Cparasitic is referring to the per pin (2pF) value, so that's what you'd plug in.
     
  21. Like
    KatiePier reacted to ILAMtitan in 3D printed G2LP and 5529LP bumpers/cases   
    I'm very interested in getting the STLs.  We just got a 3D printer in the MSP430 lab!
  22. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from spirilis in Send 10V to home thermostat via internet   
    Hi @@K2csq7,
     
    Cool project!
     
    For the networking aspect, I would look at the CC3000 Boosterpack that @@spirilis mentioned, and use an MSP-EXP430F5529LP launchpad (more memory to handle the Wi-Fi).
     
    There is actually a blog post someone did a few months ago that used a F5529 launchpad + CC3000 to let you lock/unlock your door from your phone, written in Energia: http://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/msp430blog/archive/2013/11/13/how-to-build-a-wi-fi-door-lock.aspx You could probably re-use a lot of it for getting the Wi-Fi up and working for this project. Someone did a WiFi Lamp too, that actually might even be closer to what you are doing because it was basically controlling a relay: http://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/msp430blog/archive/2013/09/22/how-to-build-a-wi-fi-lamp.aspx
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  23. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from dubnet in Send 10V to home thermostat via internet   
    Hi @@K2csq7,
     
    Cool project!
     
    For the networking aspect, I would look at the CC3000 Boosterpack that @@spirilis mentioned, and use an MSP-EXP430F5529LP launchpad (more memory to handle the Wi-Fi).
     
    There is actually a blog post someone did a few months ago that used a F5529 launchpad + CC3000 to let you lock/unlock your door from your phone, written in Energia: http://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/msp430blog/archive/2013/11/13/how-to-build-a-wi-fi-door-lock.aspx You could probably re-use a lot of it for getting the Wi-Fi up and working for this project. Someone did a WiFi Lamp too, that actually might even be closer to what you are doing because it was basically controlling a relay: http://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/msp430blog/archive/2013/09/22/how-to-build-a-wi-fi-lamp.aspx
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  24. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from LariSan in 43oh Secret Santa - 2013   
    Probably not - I think this is one of those where they cut them up out of recycled electronics. That, and it's encased in some sort of coating now so we'll never know
     
    Which actually gives a neat idea - someone should make one of these that lights an LED using the energy from the field if you put, for example, your phone near it by using the signal your Android phone sends out for NFC. Then you could encase it in plastic/glass/etc but you could have something on it light up if you put your phone near it, and no battery It would be like waving a magic wand (except you're waving your phone around)
  25. Like
    KatiePier reacted to ILAMtitan in 43oh Secret Santa - 2013   
    I received a message from my apartment complex on Thursday that a package had arrived, and thinking it was some coffee I ordered I actually put off getting it from the office.  When I picked it up, it was a clearly marked ThinkGeek box, and not my coffee at all.  Inside was a Build-On Brick Mug!!  Oddly perfect since I'm the guy in the office with the Legos in his cube,and I almost bought one a month ago.
    https://www.thinkgeek.com/product/ee3c/?srp=1
     
     

     
     
    I decide to christen it with a quick light saber duel since I didn't have any coffee; still waiting on that package.
     
     

    Thanks @@spirilis !!
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