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KatiePier

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  1. Like
    KatiePier reacted to abecedarian in programming tool -language for children   
    The trick is keeping them interested long enough to learn something. Dealing with short attention spans is always a problem- immediate feedback / results are required. You can't hand a child a Launchpad and expect more than them flashing the LED's when they push a button on it, and then they're bored asking you things like 'now what'? More functionality requires additional hardware, and now you're trying to teach electronics engineering while teaching programming.
     
    My 9 y/o nephew is somewhat fascinated by the tools and things I have here in my room but would rather build things with Lego's. Maybe start there, then segue into using NXT and other things with the Lego's?
     
    And by all means enforce the concept that there are many paths to a destination. Python is good for some things while Java and Basic are good for others; C and its derivatives are good for things too. But nothing is worth anything if the underlying hardware isn't well understood.
     
     
    ... and I find myself still trying to come to grips with it all....
  2. Like
    KatiePier reacted to cubeberg in MSP430 Part # difference   
    R = Large Tape & Reel (3000 pcs), T = Small Tape & Reel (250 pcs)
  3. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from jsolarski in TI MSP430 Wolverine now in production   
    Hi @@greeeg,
     
    Basically, XMS silicon isn't signed off on for use in mass production of end products - you should only use XMS as samples for designing your product, etc, and use production silicon to actually produce any large number of units of a product for public consumption. In addition, the XMS silicon doesn't always have all of the calibration constants in the TLV that are in the production silicon - for example, temperature sensor calibration at 85C might be missing because that clearly requires testing going through a temp chamber and that may not be done for simply these XMS engineering samples. Finally, depending on the part the first production silicon may be a different revision than some or all of the XMS parts released meaning they may have different errata fixed - always check the revision letter.
     
    In any case, once production silicon is out, it's always best to use that if you are making any sort of end-product, as it should be meeting all datasheet specs and is considered production quality.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  4. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from tripwire in TI MSP430 Wolverine now in production   
    Hi @@greeeg,
     
    Basically, XMS silicon isn't signed off on for use in mass production of end products - you should only use XMS as samples for designing your product, etc, and use production silicon to actually produce any large number of units of a product for public consumption. In addition, the XMS silicon doesn't always have all of the calibration constants in the TLV that are in the production silicon - for example, temperature sensor calibration at 85C might be missing because that clearly requires testing going through a temp chamber and that may not be done for simply these XMS engineering samples. Finally, depending on the part the first production silicon may be a different revision than some or all of the XMS parts released meaning they may have different errata fixed - always check the revision letter.
     
    In any case, once production silicon is out, it's always best to use that if you are making any sort of end-product, as it should be meeting all datasheet specs and is considered production quality.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  5. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from GeekDoc in Badge V2.0 discussion   
    If you're going RGB LED + some sort of wireless connection between badges, I think you need to be able to play a group game of Simon on them - one badge per color/button, push it when its your turn in the pattern. Probably would need something to play tones as well.
     
    What about a wi-fi detector badge with leds for signal strength?
  6. Like
    KatiePier reacted to ILAMtitan in Vetinari's Clock   
    I figured you guys might be interested in some of my tinkering with the Launchpad.  Hopefully by putting a few of my projects up here it will also keep me accountable for finishing them.
     
    This is one a cobbled together a few months ago.  It's been up on the MCU projects page on E2E, so you might have already seen it: http://e2e.ti.com/group/microcontrollerprojects/m/msp430microcontrollerprojects/664670.aspx
     
     
    PROJECT OVERVIEW
    The Vetinari clock is from a book series known as Discworld, where Lord Verinari has a clock in his waiting room which has an irregular tick. The idea of the clock is to add a sense of unease and anxiety to anyone in the waiting room since their brain doesn't filter out the ticks like a normal clock. Here's a video to get a better idea of the result.  The tick is actually a lot louder in person.
     


     
    SOFTWARE DESIGN
    To accomplish this task on a 430, we create an array of possible time frames to tick the clock, and parse through it at 4Hz. The array is 32 entries long, so it equates to 32 seconds in the real world. By randomly setting 32 of the elements high, we create a timing sequence. A high element will generate a tick of the clock. This means a second on the clock can be as little as 250ms, or as long as 24 seconds, and still keep accurate time.  Check the attached software too see how it's all done; I did my best to comment it up.  main.c
     
    HARDWARE DESIGN
    The clock coil is driven via an alternating polarity pulse.  The easiest way to change a load's polarity with an MCU is using an h-bridge.
     

     
    The schematic shown is a simple implementation using two NPN and two PNP transistors.  I had the transistors and drive resistors laying around, so this part was easy to cobble together (along with the half used battery holder).  It would be easy to use a single IO pin per side of the bridge, but the transistors fit better onto the launchpad, as shown in the image.  To add the driving resistors in series, I cut a small gap in the traces, scrapped off the solder mask on either side to make pads, and put down a small SMA resistor.  It's not pretty, but it works.
     

     
    In the clock mechanism, there is a small control board with a crystal and epoxy glob IC that normally runs the clock.  I just ripped that out and directly attached the coil to the h-bridge.
     

     
    The resulting clock is actually more maddening than I expected in a quiet environment.  By using 3V rather than the 1.5V that the original movement used, the ticks are much more pronounced and do an excellent job of ruining a person's calm.
  7. Like
    KatiePier reacted to gwdeveloper in Making commercial electronics, self-financed - steps?   
    Electronics and certification aside, make sure you protect yourself legally too.  Lawyer, indemnification... start an LLC or something.
  8. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from bluehash in TI MSP430 Wolverine now in production   
    Hi @@greeeg,
     
    Basically, XMS silicon isn't signed off on for use in mass production of end products - you should only use XMS as samples for designing your product, etc, and use production silicon to actually produce any large number of units of a product for public consumption. In addition, the XMS silicon doesn't always have all of the calibration constants in the TLV that are in the production silicon - for example, temperature sensor calibration at 85C might be missing because that clearly requires testing going through a temp chamber and that may not be done for simply these XMS engineering samples. Finally, depending on the part the first production silicon may be a different revision than some or all of the XMS parts released meaning they may have different errata fixed - always check the revision letter.
     
    In any case, once production silicon is out, it's always best to use that if you are making any sort of end-product, as it should be meeting all datasheet specs and is considered production quality.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  9. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from greeeg in TI MSP430 Wolverine now in production   
    Hi @@greeeg,
     
    Basically, XMS silicon isn't signed off on for use in mass production of end products - you should only use XMS as samples for designing your product, etc, and use production silicon to actually produce any large number of units of a product for public consumption. In addition, the XMS silicon doesn't always have all of the calibration constants in the TLV that are in the production silicon - for example, temperature sensor calibration at 85C might be missing because that clearly requires testing going through a temp chamber and that may not be done for simply these XMS engineering samples. Finally, depending on the part the first production silicon may be a different revision than some or all of the XMS parts released meaning they may have different errata fixed - always check the revision letter.
     
    In any case, once production silicon is out, it's always best to use that if you are making any sort of end-product, as it should be meeting all datasheet specs and is considered production quality.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  10. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from pine in TI MSP430 Wolverine now in production   
    Hi @@greeeg,
     
    Basically, XMS silicon isn't signed off on for use in mass production of end products - you should only use XMS as samples for designing your product, etc, and use production silicon to actually produce any large number of units of a product for public consumption. In addition, the XMS silicon doesn't always have all of the calibration constants in the TLV that are in the production silicon - for example, temperature sensor calibration at 85C might be missing because that clearly requires testing going through a temp chamber and that may not be done for simply these XMS engineering samples. Finally, depending on the part the first production silicon may be a different revision than some or all of the XMS parts released meaning they may have different errata fixed - always check the revision letter.
     
    In any case, once production silicon is out, it's always best to use that if you are making any sort of end-product, as it should be meeting all datasheet specs and is considered production quality.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  11. Like
    KatiePier reacted to bluehash in Jellybean SPI/I2C components   
    @@mcenhillk Have you looked at the educational boosterpack 2?
    Temperature sensor     TMP006 Ambient Light sensor     OPT3001 (will not be available on the first revision) Analog 3-axis accelerometer     KXTC9-2050 RGB LED      Electret microphone      Magnetic buzzer      128x128 SPI-based TFT LCD   
  12. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from spirilis in TI MSP430 Wolverine now in production   
    Hi @@greeeg,
     
    Basically, XMS silicon isn't signed off on for use in mass production of end products - you should only use XMS as samples for designing your product, etc, and use production silicon to actually produce any large number of units of a product for public consumption. In addition, the XMS silicon doesn't always have all of the calibration constants in the TLV that are in the production silicon - for example, temperature sensor calibration at 85C might be missing because that clearly requires testing going through a temp chamber and that may not be done for simply these XMS engineering samples. Finally, depending on the part the first production silicon may be a different revision than some or all of the XMS parts released meaning they may have different errata fixed - always check the revision letter.
     
    In any case, once production silicon is out, it's always best to use that if you are making any sort of end-product, as it should be meeting all datasheet specs and is considered production quality.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  13. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from oPossum in SPI 4-Pin Mode and TX Interrupt won't work, in 3-Pin Mode it works   
    Just as a side-note for others searching for help: if you get one of the parts that has the new eUSCI module (FR57xx, FR59xx, some of the F5xx/6xx parts) it has an option to set the 4th pin up as a true chip select function instead of Slave-Transmit-Enable (STE), so that you don't have to do it on your own with a separate IO anymore.
     
    www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slaa522 USCI to eUSCI migration guide
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  14. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from spirilis in SPI 4-Pin Mode and TX Interrupt won't work, in 3-Pin Mode it works   
    Just as a side-note for others searching for help: if you get one of the parts that has the new eUSCI module (FR57xx, FR59xx, some of the F5xx/6xx parts) it has an option to set the 4th pin up as a true chip select function instead of Slave-Transmit-Enable (STE), so that you don't have to do it on your own with a separate IO anymore.
     
    www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slaa522 USCI to eUSCI migration guide
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  15. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from roadrunner84 in SPI 4-Pin Mode and TX Interrupt won't work, in 3-Pin Mode it works   
    Just as a side-note for others searching for help: if you get one of the parts that has the new eUSCI module (FR57xx, FR59xx, some of the F5xx/6xx parts) it has an option to set the 4th pin up as a true chip select function instead of Slave-Transmit-Enable (STE), so that you don't have to do it on your own with a separate IO anymore.
     
    www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slaa522 USCI to eUSCI migration guide
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  16. Like
    KatiePier reacted to oPossum in SPI 4-Pin Mode and TX Interrupt won't work, in 3-Pin Mode it works   
    Make sure UCxSTE is the proper level to allow transmission. 4 pin mode is for multi-master operation and is very rarely used.
  17. Like
    KatiePier reacted to oPossum in SPI 4-Pin Mode and TX Interrupt won't work, in 3-Pin Mode it works   
    Yes, you have to use 3 wire mode and a normal IO pin to select your SPI slave device.
  18. Like
    KatiePier reacted to roadrunner84 in Be aware : Launchpad can retain old code in memory   
    @@hary
    No, user guide. In the case of the Launchpad's chips (the MSP430G2554 et al) you should probably start with reading the MSP430x2xx series family guide, which contains generic information about the series of chips. This includes clocks, GPIO, timers, etc. Then there is the data sheet specific to one or a very few chips. This contains electrical information (max source/sink current, bandwidths, etc.) and information specific to that chip, like which secondary functions exist on which pins (eg: where are which channels of your ADC located).
     
    Energia does include libraries and is easier to install and use than CCS. In the latest realease CCS does support Energia sketches, but not everyone uses the newest CCS. Others use (or used to use) IAR, which was really good, but has more recently been surpassed by CCS (imho). If you like/prefer CCS, feel free to use it, the gap to using Energia sketches should be closed already.
  19. Like
    KatiePier reacted to RobG in Be aware : Launchpad can retain old code in memory   
    There are different reset conditions (BOR, POR, etc. ) and they do different things. Uploading new code does not remove power from MCU, so the reset might be different than when you plug the board and load your code for the first time. Which LP do you have?
  20. Like
    KatiePier reacted to Mark Easley TI in Be aware : Launchpad can retain old code in memory   
    CCS is an industry grade IDE for serious embedded development. For customers starting out or who prefer something more lightweight and portable, Energia is a better choice. 
     
    Energia is also cool because the abstraction layer allows it to be architecture independent, so you can run the same sketches on MSP430, Tiva, C2000, etc. 
     
    Finally, if you ever want to "graduate" to CCS, CCS version 6 has an Energia import feature, so you can take your sketches and APIs you are familar with, but also take advantage of full HW debugger and many other features of CCS. The idea is to have multiple points of entry for customers, so that they can develop applications in the most comfortable way. 
  21. Like
    KatiePier got a reaction from gsutton in programming a MSP430G2955?   
    Hi kendalls,
     
    Sorry for all of the frustration this has caused. I thought I might be able to provide some useful information for others trying to use G2955 in the future and an update on some of the topics in this old thread.
     
    The MSP-EXP430F5529LP launchpad has a newer redesigned emulation than the MSP-EXP430G2 Launchpad, and this is why this works for your setup. For reference, the G2 launchpad emulation section is usually called "eZ-430" and the new one on the F5529 is "eZ-FET Lite". Now, the reason the G2xx5 support was not added in later on G2 is because there is not a good way built in on that emulator to be able to reliably update the firmware - please see Dietmar's comments in these e2e threads concerning these topics: http://e2e.ti.com/support/microcontrollers/msp430/f/166/p/255422/900180.aspx#900180 http://e2e.ti.com/support/microcontrollers/msp430/f/166/p/254008/897717.aspx#897717 The G2xx Launchpad wasn't really designed to be used with other devices or to be updateable, and unfortunately G2955 came out later (and can't fit in launchpad board).
     
    However in that second post you can see where Dietmar mentions that the "next generation on-board emulator will be update-able and support all MSP430 devices" - this is the eZ-FET lite that he was referring to, which is now available on the F5529 Launchpad. So F5529 Launchpad supports most MSP430s (basically all SBW devices) including G2955 - you can see this on this wiki page as well: http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/EZ-FET_lite and in the F5529 Launchpad user's guide http://www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slau533 p. 25 section 2.5. This is what we are using on new boards going forward, as you can see this is true on the new FR5969 Launchpad as well: http://www.ti.com/lit/pdf/slau535 section 2.6.
     
    And then of course as always the FET tool can also be used to program all MSP430 variants, and has additional features (adjustable voltage level, 4-wire JTAG as well as SBW, faster programming, etc). One more note - there is a target development board available for G2955 as well: http://www.ti.com/tool/msp-ts430da38 though of course you can make your own board too.
     
    Regards,
    Katie
  22. Like
    KatiePier reacted to pabigot in Be aware : Launchpad can retain old code in memory   
    It's also not surprising. PxOUT is not cleared on reset; since you enabled the pin for output, the previous setting is left unchanged. This is documented in the 2xx family user's guide (Table 8-2 Digital I/O Registers) from slau144j. A sufficiently long power-down might cure the problem, but in general if you're going to change the configuration of a GPIO from its power-up state you should set all the relevant registers.
  23. Like
    KatiePier reacted to Mark Easley TI in PicassoBot   
    Everyone check out this kickstarter, it is very cool. I saw the live demo at Maker Faire. It makes you wonder what other cool applications you can do with a LaunchPad and some servos?
  24. Like
    KatiePier reacted to Fred in IO when msp430 is powered down?   
    roadrunner84 beat me to it. Why power a MSP430 down when it draws so little current in the low power modes. Quicker and easier to start them back up too.
     
    @@roadrunner84 - Isn't it terrible how the roadrunner is remember for his violence, rather than his wonderful photo realistic pictures of tunnels?
  25. Like
    KatiePier reacted to chicken in PicassoBot   
    Just came across this Kickstarter that features the MSP430G2553 LaunchPad and Energia:
     
    PicassoBot, the Portrait Sketching Robot Kit.
    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/educatedrobot/picassobot-the-portrait-sketching-robot-kit
     
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