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RobLewis

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  1. Like
    RobLewis got a reaction from bogdanvisan20 in [Energia Library] Bosch BMP085 Template Library   
    Reflecting on this a bit more, I wonder if one of the later Energia updates somehow broke the I2C driver when the F5529 (and possibly other boards) is run at 16 MHz. 
     
    And of course that 8-bit patch needs to be mainlined, eh? 
  2. Like
    RobLewis reacted to mbruder in [Energia Library] OneWire DS18B20 (430 & Stellaris)   
    I'm starting to use Launchpad CC3200 and I had no luck with any of those libraries. Has anyone been working with CC3200 and DS18B20?
  3. Like
    RobLewis got a reaction from pine in Bitlash   
    I just discovered an impressive Arduino program called Bitlash in a video demo http://pinocc.io/blog/building-the-internet-of-things/preview-pinoccio-api/ (about the Pinoccio mesh networking module). 
     
    It lets you define and run tasks from a shell. 
     
    Has anyone tried porting it to the MSP430? 
  4. Like
    RobLewis got a reaction from enl in Bitlash   
    I just discovered an impressive Arduino program called Bitlash in a video demo http://pinocc.io/blog/building-the-internet-of-things/preview-pinoccio-api/ (about the Pinoccio mesh networking module). 
     
    It lets you define and run tasks from a shell. 
     
    Has anyone tried porting it to the MSP430? 
  5. Like
    RobLewis got a reaction from abc in MSP430 and Java?   
    I've dabbled in a lot of languages, but never made it to C or C++. Now, in the course of helping my son pursue a CS degree, I find myself learning Java. 
     
    What, if any, are the options for programming the TI LaunchPads in Java? Opinions? (other than the expected "Java sux" :-(
  6. Like
    RobLewis reacted to enl in MSP430 and Java?   
    I am not going to argue about opinion, but I will give a little of the background.
     
    Java was designed on essentially religious principles: To be a PURE OO language, 100% self consistant, no compromise. It didn't make it... even 1.0 had features that broke the paradigm. There are more now.
     
    The OO model is not ideal for everything. The purists worked from the belief that it is. For application where the model IS appropriate (there are many), and portability across platforms is needed, Java isn't a bad choice. For network delivered, heavyweight applications, Java is a pretty good fit, as the object model Java uses allows for unambiguous, automatic chunking of an application, with parts loading as needed. No bandwidth use for unneeded parts.
     
    Much early dev  for dynamic network delivery was LISP/Scheme -- I had some friends in this when I was still hanging around MIT -- but the first good turnkey tool was Java. There are others now, but they all have some significant flaws comparable to Java. In my opinion, the flaws are inherent to the model.
     
    Java took off in the mid-90's due t a number of things, but I tend to believe it was 1) a combo of it being the first purpose-designed, ground up developed OO language that wasn't a toy, and 2) zealotry about the OO model at the time. The fairly natural support for network delivery was also a factor, but I don't tend to think of it as the major one.
     
    Benefits to the OO model are  the compartmentalization of data and tying functions to the data tightly. The Java model provides the ability to insure type safety and access control fairly well.
     
    The biggest drawback to the OO model are the hidden interactions and cumbersome access methods that come from tying functions tightly to data and the compartmentalization of the data.
     
    Debugging a large Java application is a beast. Well designed objects make it a lot easier. Poorly designed objects make it impossible. Java enforces nothing that isn't generally good practice anyway in a large system, but makes it impossible to avoid the cumbersomeness in a small system. Poor programmers can still produce crummy code, but Java does block some of the worst issues that tend to show up in C++.
     
     
    I am obviously not a fan of Java as the end-all of programming. It is big, slow (Gee... I think that may tweak a few people...), has crummy numeric support (lets tweak a few more...) and is bloated. On the other hand, for applications that need dynamic distribution with no extra load on the programmer, need large suites of standard tools, or need to run on multiple platforms and generally not know the difference between them, it is a pretty good tool.
  7. Like
    RobLewis reacted to chicken in How to make a ROM image of a sketch for distribution   
    Thanks to @@adrianF for providing the answer to what OP actually asked about.
     
    Yes, changing the oil on my car is easy, but I still prefer to pay a mechanic to do it for me. And I won't try to teach someone how to do it if he/she asks me for a shop's address.
  8. Like
    RobLewis reacted to adrianF in How to make a ROM image of a sketch for distribution   
    In the "Sketch" menu/drop-down inside of Energia, there are a few simple ways to get to the generated hex file of your compiled sketch. 
    - "Copy Hex file as path" will add the directory path to your hex file to your clipboard
    - "Show compilation folder" will open up your windows explorer to show where all of the compiled files are, including the .hex file
     
    Now that you have the .hex file, users can flash this to a LaunchPad with several tools:
    - For MSP users, there is MSP430Flasher @ www.ti.com/msp430flasher // this tool is lightweight, has the ability to create batch files for simple one-click flashing, etc.
    - For Tiva C users, there is LMFlasher @ http://www.ti.com/tool/lmflashprogrammer
    - There is also the catch-all TI CCS UniFlash @ http://www.ti.com/tool/uniflash
    - And also third party tools such as the one flasher from Elprotronic
     
    Hope this helps!
  9. Like
    RobLewis reacted to Rei Vilo in SOLVED! DHT22 Temp & RH% One-Wire Sensor on Energia   
    The pin value is defined in the constructor. See the example provided DHT22_430_main.ino at lines 68-70:
    #define DHTPIN P1_4 DHT22 mySensor(DHTPIN);
  10. Like
    RobLewis got a reaction from bluehash in Water Pump   
    I took apart a broken refrigerator and there was a nice little solenoid valve controlling water supply to the ice maker. 
     
    This might be perfect if you can use water from a hose bib. I'd put an inexpensive pressure regulator upstream of the valve to make the water stream more manageable. Something like this from DripWorks: 
    http://www.dripworks.com/product/Q_PRSG
     
    Whatever you do, beware of freezing temps! 
  11. Like
    RobLewis got a reaction from bluehash in Bitlash   
    I just discovered an impressive Arduino program called Bitlash in a video demo http://pinocc.io/blog/building-the-internet-of-things/preview-pinoccio-api/ (about the Pinoccio mesh networking module). 
     
    It lets you define and run tasks from a shell. 
     
    Has anyone tried porting it to the MSP430? 
  12. Like
    RobLewis got a reaction from zeke in Bitlash   
    I just discovered an impressive Arduino program called Bitlash in a video demo http://pinocc.io/blog/building-the-internet-of-things/preview-pinoccio-api/ (about the Pinoccio mesh networking module). 
     
    It lets you define and run tasks from a shell. 
     
    Has anyone tried porting it to the MSP430? 
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