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  1. Like
    link reacted to chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    Overview
    dAISy (do AIS yourself) is a very simple AIS receiver that I developed from scratch. It is built around the Silicon Labs EZRadioPRO Si4362 receiver, using a Texas Instruments MSP430G2553 MCU for processing and the MSP-EXP430G2 v1.5 LaunchPad as development platform.

    The complete project source code and schematics are available on GitHub: https://github.com/astuder/dAISy

    Update 5/18/2015: A finished, self-contained AIS receiver based on this project is now available for purchase in my web store.
     
    AIS, short for Automatic Identification System, is a standard for tracking ships. Ships advertise their position, course and other information with short transmissions on specific frequencies (161.975 MHz and 162.025 MHz). More on Wikipedia.
     
    An AIS receiver, like dAISy, receives and decodes AIS transmissions. It then re-packages the raw data into NMEA sentences (specifically formatted ASCII strings). Finally, using a serial connection, these strings are forwarded to more capable equipment for further processing.
     

     
    If you're the lucky owner of a tricked out boat, you could connect dAISy to your navigation computer. For land lobbers like me, a more common use case is to run naval mapping software that supports AIS data input on a PC. In the screenshot below I've connected dAISy to OpenCPN (link), an open source chart plotter and navigation software.
     

     
    On the top right you can see my setup war-driving at the Seattle waterfront as my lab is too far from the coast to receive anything. The LaunchPad sits on the dashboard with a white USB cable connecting to the notebook computer in the foreground.
     
    dAISy's data is fed into OpenCPN, bottom right shows a log of the serial data received. OpenCPN maintains a database of all the collected data (lower left) and visualizes nearby ships on a map (top center), including past and projected course. Hovering the mouse over a ship will display its name (text on yellow ground) and clicking it will reveal more detail (top left).
     
    Hardware
    I wanted to build my own, non-SDR, AIS receiver for a long time. There are a few projects floating around the internet (e.g. here) which refer back to an article by Peter Baston, published 2008 in Circuit Cellar magazine (copy available here gone.. google for Peter Baston Circuit Cellar to find other copies). Unfortunately, the CMX family of modem ICs by CMS Microcircuits (link) used in these projects are relatively expensive ($15+) and hard to find for hobbyists. In addition you'd need a radio to do tune into and down-convert from the ~162 MHz carrier frequency.
     
    So I was quite excited when earlier this year a parametric search on Mouser brought up a new IC  that covered the required range (162 MHz) and modulation (GMSK). And best of all, available in single quantities for $3.56 $2.27 $2.22! (link)
     
    The Silicon Labs EzRadioPRO Si4362 (link) is a single chip receiver that covers frequencies from 142 to 1050 MHz and supports various modulations, including GMSK. It comes in a tiny 20-pin QFN package and the only external parts required are a 30 MHz crystal, an antenna with a few capacitors and inductors for impedance matching, and finally some decoupling caps and pull-down resistors.
     
    Time to whip up a breakout board. I used the opportunity to give KiCad a try and quite like it.
     
    Here's the schematic:

     
    And the layout:

     
    I used OSHPark to make the PCBs. At a smidgen over one square inch it cost  $5.15 for 3 copies:

    http://oshpark.com/shared_projects/QUWi71r4
     
    Note that the layout still has three issues that I already fixed in the schematic:
    GPIO0 and GPIO1 were flipped SDO required a pull-down resistor as the radio leaves it floating when not actively sending, which confused the hell out of me while trying to figure out the communication protocol. Lastly, the holes for the headers turned out to be slightly too small to comfortably fit the cheap breakout headers I had at hand. Edit: Here's Rev B where I fixed these issues: http://oshpark.com/shared_projects/WI6u3Qmk
     
    Which brings us to the BOM:
    Silicon Labs Si4362 (U1) 30 MHz crystal (X1) Si4362 datasheet specifies <11 pF load capacitance, but a crystal specified for 12pF load capacitance seems to work fine too Antenna/LNA matching network, calculated based on SiLabs AN643 (link, approx. values, +/- 5% shouldn't matter too much): 75 ohm (dipole): 10 pF (CR1), 5 pF (CR2), 280 nH (LR1), 200 nH (LR2) 50 ohm: 12 pF (CR1), 6 pF (CR2), 240 nH (LR1), 160 nH (LR2) Decoupling caps: 100 pF, 100 nF, 1uF (C1, C2, C3) Pull-down resistors 100 k (R1, R2) First thing I noticed when I received the parts: The 20-pin QFN at 4x4 millimeters is tiny!

     
    I mounted it by first tinning the pads with a small quantity of solder. I then added flux and placed the chip on the pad. I then used a hot air station to carefully reflow the solder. Worked the first time around.

    After using jumper wires to figure out how to talk to the chip, I mounted the breakout board on a makeshift BoosterPack using perfboard, double-sided tape and wire (see picture at the top of the post).



    Here's how I ended up connecting the breakout board to the LaunchPad / MSP430G2553:
    SEL -> P1.4 (SPI chip select) SCLK -> P1.5 (SPI CLK) SDO -> P1.6 (SPI MISO) SDI -> P1.7 (SPI MOSI) GPIO0 -> P2.0 (I/O unused) GPIO1 -> P2.1 (I/O clear-to-send) GPIO2 -> P2.2 (I/O RX clock) GPIO3 -> P2.3 (I/O RX data) SDN -> P2.4 (shutdown / reset) IRQ -> P2.5 (I/O channel-clear) Software
    The software of dAISy consists of three major blocks:
    Radio configuration and control over SPI Packet handler, including a basic FIFO for received messages NMEA encoding and transmission to the PC over UART For UART (TX only) and SPI (TX/RX) I use the MSP430G2553's USCI A0 and B0 respectively. In both cases I don't use interrupts which simplifies things considerably.
     
    Upon reset the following steps happen:
    Initialize MSP430 peripherals Initialize packet handler, which will also reset FIFO Initialize and configure of radio, which will also setup SPI Start packet handler, which will also put the radio into receive mode And in the main loop:
    If debug messages are enabled, poll packet handler for status and errors and report them over UART Check FIFO for new packets If there is a new packet, invoke NMEA processing (which sends the message over serial to the PC) and remove packet from FIFO Below follows a more detailed discussion of the radio integration and the implementation of the packet handler.
     
    Radio
    The communication with the radio is vanilla SPI using 4 wires: MOSI (SDI), MISO (SDO), CLK (SCLK) and CS (SEL). I used the MSP430's USCI B0 to implement SPI and a separate pin to control CS.
     
    The only tricky thing to figure out was, that the Si4362 keeps the MISO line floating unless it actively transmits data. This is unfortunate as the master is supposed to poll for a specific response (FF) to detect when the radio is ready to receive more commands. This is easily fixed by adding a weak pull down resistor to SDO. I did this on the board, but it probably also works with using MSP430's internal pull-down.
     
    Additional lines I used to control the radio are:
    SDN to reset the radio CTS, which by default is mapped to the radio's GPIO1, indicating that the radio is ready for the next command While taking up an extra pin, CTS turned out to be much more convenient than the SPI response code to properly time communication flow with the radio. In dAISy, I wait for CTS to go high after each command to ensure the radio completed its task.
     
    The communication protocol is quite extensive but well documented:
    EZRadioPRO API Documentation describes the complete API and all registers AN633 Programming Guide for EZRadioPro Si4x6x Devices describes how to use the API in common scenarios Both are available on the Si4362 product page (link), under Documentation > Application Notes and are still updated quite frequently.
     
    The radio is set up by dumping a large configuration sequence into it. This includes configuration of radio frequency, modulation, GPIO pins and more. This information is stored in radio_config.h, which has to be generated with a tool called WDS (Wireless Development Suite). WDS is available in the Tools section on the Si4362 product site.
     

     
    Above are the settings I used for dAISy. WDS will use this information to configure various amplifiers, filters, clocks and decoding algorithms inside the chip. As Si4362 supports GMSK encoding only indirectly (see this thread), I'm certain there's more optimization potential by tweaking registers, but that's currently way beyond my knowledge of RF theory.
     
    While the Si4362 comes with its own packet handler, it unfortunately does not support NRZI encoding (Wikipedia). So I set up the radio to expose the 9600 baud clock and received data on separate pins and implemented my own packet handler.
     
    Packet Handler
    The packet handler (inspired by Peter Baston's implementation) is implemented as a state machine that is invoked on each rising edge of pin P2.2 which receives the data clock.
     

    There are 5 main states:
    Off, no processing of incoming data Reset, start from anew, either on start up or after successful/failed processing of a packet Wait for Sync, waiting for a training sequence to arrive (010101..) and start flag (01111110), implemented with its own state machine   Reset, start new preamble 0, last bit was a zero 1, last bit was a one flag, training sequence complete, now process start flag Prefetch, ingest the next 8 message bits to ease further processing Receive Packet, process bits until the end flag (01111110) is found or an error situation occurs Independent of state, the interrupt routine continually decodes NRZI into actual bit sequence.
     
    In the "Receive Packet" state there's continuous calculation of the packet CRC and some bit-de-stuffing. When the end flag is found and the CRC is correct, the received message is committed into the FIFO. If an error is encountered, the bytes already written to the FIFO are discarded. In both cases, the state machine starts anew by transitioning into RESET.
    This reads like a lot of code for an interrupt handler. However with the MCU running at 16MHz even the most complex state only uses a fraction (<10%) of the available time.
     
    Future Improvements
    Lastly a list of things I'd like to improve with the next version of dAISy.
     
    Software:
    Receiving on both AIS channels through channel-hopping done 1/5/2014 Tweak radio settings for better sensitivity and lower error rate LED(s) for indicating reception of valid/corrupt packets Hardware:
    Proper antenna connector Layout PCB as BoosterPack and/or USB dongle Receiving on both AIS channels at once with two radio ICs -- edit 12/25: replaced original post with high-level project description, more detailed documentation of implementation to come
    -- edit 12/28: added documentation for hardware (here and on Github), fixed some typos
    -- edit 12/31: added documentation for software and list of future improvements
    -- edit 01/05: implemented channel hopping (change to state machine)
    -- edit 01/15: changed state machine to reflect recent changes (see post further down for details), added link to shared project on OSHPark
    -- edit 01/25: major rework of sync detection state machine

  2. Like
    link got a reaction from ROFLhoff in Multi-battery Voltmeter   
    Hello,
     
    The 100R/100k may act as a voltage divider, but with low impact on the measurement. With higher values on the input resistances you may get problems, because the sample and hold capacitor may take longer to load.
     
    Enviado desde mi HTC Sensation Z710e mediante Tapatalk
     
     
  3. Like
    link reacted to oPossum in Using the internal temperature sensor   
    TI has some sample code for the internal temperature sensor, but it does not explain how to scale the ADC reading to useful units of degrees. Here is a step-by-step explanation of how to do the scaling with integer math for degrees C, K and F. There is also sample code to display the temperature on a Nokia 5110 LCD.

     
    The data sheet (SLAU144) has this formula for converting temperature in degrees Celsius to voltage.
    V = 0.00355 * C + 0.986

    What we need is a formula for converting voltage to temperature.
     
    Rewrite the data sheet fomula with temperature on the left
    0.00355 * C + 0.986 = V
     
    Divide both sides by 0.00355
    C + 277.75 = V / 0.00355
     
    Subtract 277.75 from both sides
    C = V / 0.00355 - 277.75
     
    Now we have a formula for converting voltage to temperature.
     
    The data sheet has this formula for converting voltage to ADC value, once again the opposite of what we neeed.

    For Vref- == 0
    A = 1023 * V / Vref
     
    Swap sides
    1023 * V / Vref = A
     
    Multiply by Vref
    1023 * V = A * Vref
     
    Divide by 1023
    V = A * Vref / 1023
     
    For a 1.5V reference
    V = A * 1.5 / 1023
     
    Simplify
    V = A * 0.0014663
     
    Substitute ADC conversion forumula for voltage in the temperature conversion formula.
    C = A * 0.0014663 / 0.00355 - 277.75
     
    Simplify
    C = A * 0.413 - 277.75
     
    Now we have a formula to convert ADC reading to temperature.
    It uses real numbers, so floating point math is required for good precision.
    Floating point is slow and requires more flash, so let's use integer math instead.
    Multiply by 65536 (2^16) and then divide by the same.
    C = (A * 27069 - 18202393) / 65536
     
    Use a right shift instead of divide. This will become a move of high word to low word.
    C = (A * 27069 - 18202393) >> 16
     
    Add 0.5 * 65536 to impove rounding.
    C = (A * 27069 - 18202393 + 32768) >> 16
     
    Simplify.
    C = (A * 27069 - 18169625) >> 16
     
    So that is how to go from ADC to degrees Celsius.
     
     
    To convert degrees C to degees K.
    K = C + 273.15
     
    Applied to ADC to degrees C conversion formula.
    K = (A * 27069 - 18169625) >> 16 - 273.15
     
    Implement with integer math by multiplying by 65536
    K = (A * 27069 - 18169625 - 17,901,158) >> 16
     
    Simplify.
    K = (A * 27069 - 268467) >> 16
     
    To convert degrees C to degrees F.
    F = C * 9 / 5 + 32
     
    Applied to voltage to degrees C conversion forumula
    F = (V / 0.00355 - 277.75) * 9 / 5 + 32
     
    Multiply by 9
    F = (V / 0.0003944 - 2499.75) / 5 + 32
     
    Divide by 5
    F = (V / 0.0019722 - 499.95) + 32
     
    Add 32
    F = V / 0.0019722 - 467.95
     
    Substitute ADC to voltage forumula
    F = A * 0.0014663 / 0.0019722 - 467.95
     
    Simplifiy
    F = A * 0.7435 - 467.95
     
    Convert to integer
    F = (A * 48724 - 30667156) >> 16
     
    Improve rounding
    F = (A * 48724 - 30667156 + 32768) >> 16
     
    Simplify
    F = (A * 48724 - 30634388) >> 16
     
    So now we have three formulas to convert ADC reading to degrees C, K and F using fast and compact integer math.
    C = (A * 27069 - 18169625) >> 16
    K = (A * 27069 - 268467) >> 16
    F = (A * 48724 - 30634388) >> 16
     
    Using the ADC value, rather than a different temperature scale, will ensure greatest precision for each temperature scale.
     
    main.c

    #include #include #include "lcd.h" #define ADC_SLEEP // Sleep during ADC conversion //#define SHOW_ADC // Show ADC raw and ADC millivolts // Print integer from -999 to 9999 using 12 x 16 font void print_int(int i, const unsigned y) { if(i < -999 || i > 9999) return; const unsigned neg = i < 0; if(neg) i = -i; div_t d; d.quot = i; unsigned x = 48; do { d = div(d.quot, 10); pd12(d.rem, x -= 12, y); } while(d.quot); if(neg) pd12(14, x -= 12, y); while(x) pd12(10, x -= 12, y); } // Print integer from 0 to 9999 vertically using 6 x 8 font void print_v(int i, unsigned x) { unsigned y = 4; unsigned c; if(i < 0 || i > 9999) return; div_t d; d.quot = i; do { d = div(d.quot, 10); c = d.rem + '0'; lcd_print((char *)&c, x, --y); } while(d.quot); c = ' '; while(y) lcd_print((char *)&c, x, --y); } void main(void) { unsigned adc; // ADC value int c, k, f; // Temperature in degrees C, K, and F unsigned mv; // ADC reading in millivolts // WDTCTL = WDTPW | WDTHOLD; // Disable watchdog reset // lcd_init(); // Initialize LCD lcd_clear(0); // pd12(15, 48, 0); // Degrees pd12(17, 59, 0); // F pd12(15, 48, 2); // Degrees pd12(16, 58, 2); // C pd12(15, 48, 4); // Degrees pd12(18, 59, 4); // K #ifdef SHOW_ADC // lcd_print("Am", 72, 4); // AD / mV lcd_print("DV", 72, 5); // #endif // // ADC10CTL0 = 0; // Configure ADC ADC10CTL1 = INCH_10 | ADC10DIV_3; // ADC10CTL0 = SREF_1 | ADC10SHT_3 | REFON | ADC10ON | ADC10IE; //ADC10CTL0 = SREF_1 | ADC10SHT_3 | REFON | ADC10ON | ADC10IE | REF2_5V; #ifdef ADC_SLEEP // ADC10CTL0 |= ADC10IE; // Enable ADC conversion complete interrupt #endif // // for(; { // for-ever #ifdef ADC_SLEEP // ADC10CTL0 |= (ENC | ADC10SC); // Begin ADC conversion __bis_SR_register(LPM0_bits + GIE); // Sleep until conversion complete #else // ADC10CTL0 &= ~ADC10IFG; // Clear conversion complete flag ADC10CTL0 |= (ENC | ADC10SC); // Begin ADC conversion while(!(ADC10CTL0 & ADC10IFG)); // Wait for conversion to complete #endif // // adc = ADC10MEM; // Read ADC // // Convert to temperature c = ((27069L * adc) - 18169625L) >> 16; // Vref = 1.5V //c = ((45115L * adc) - 18169625L) >> 16; // Vref = 2.5V // k = ((27069L * adc) - 268467L) >> 16; // Vref = 1.5V //k = ((45115L * adc) - 268467L) >> 16; // Vref = 2.5V // f = ((48724L * adc) - 30634388L) >> 16; // Vref = 1.5V //f = ((81206L * adc) - 30634388L) >> 16; // Vref = 2.5V // // Convert to millivolts mv = (96094L * adc + 32768) >> 16; // Vref = 1.5V //mv = (160156L * adc + 32768) >> 16; // Vref = 2.5V // // Display on LCD print_int(f, 0); // Degrees F print_int(c, 2); // Degrees C print_int(k, 4); // Degrees K // #ifdef SHOW_ADC // print_v(adc, 72); // ADC print_v(mv, 78); // ADC millivolts #endif // // //__delay_cycles(100000); // } // } #pragma vector = ADC10_VECTOR // ADC conversion complete interrupt __interrupt void ADC10_ISR(void) // { // __bic_SR_register_on_exit(LPM0_bits); // Wakeup main code } //
     
    lcd.h

    typedef enum { lcd_command = 0, // Array of one or more commands lcd_data = 1, // Array of one or more bytes of data lcd_data_repeat = 2 // One byte of data repeated } lcd_cmd_type; void lcd_send(const unsigned char *cmd, unsigned len, const lcd_cmd_type type); void lcd_home(void); void lcd_pos(unsigned char x, unsigned char y); void lcd_clear(unsigned char x); void lcd_init(void); void lcd_print(char *s, unsigned x, unsigned y); void pd12(unsigned n, unsigned x, unsigned y);
     
    lcd.c

    #include #include "lcd.h" //static const unsigned TXD = BIT1; static const unsigned RXD = BIT2; static const unsigned SWITCH = BIT3; static const unsigned LCD_CLK = BIT5; static const unsigned LCD_BACKLIGHT = BIT6; static const unsigned LCD_DATA = BIT7; static const unsigned LCD_DC = BIT0; // PORT2 static const unsigned LCD_CE = BIT1; // PORT2 void lcd_send(const unsigned char *cmd, unsigned len, const lcd_cmd_type type) { register unsigned mask; P2OUT &= ~LCD_CE; do { mask = 0x0080; do { if(*cmd & mask) { P1OUT &= ~LCD_CLK; P1OUT |= LCD_DATA; } else { P1OUT &= ~(LCD_CLK | LCD_DATA); } P1OUT |= LCD_CLK; mask >>= 1; } while(!(mask & 1)); if(!type) P2OUT &= ~LCD_DC; if(*cmd & mask) { P1OUT &= ~LCD_CLK; P1OUT |= LCD_DATA; } else { P1OUT &= ~(LCD_CLK | LCD_DATA); } P1OUT |= LCD_CLK; P2OUT |= LCD_DC; if(!(type & 2)) ++cmd; } while(--len); P2OUT |= LCD_CE; } static const unsigned char home[] = { 0x40, 0x80 }; void lcd_home(void) { lcd_send(home, sizeof(home), lcd_command); } void lcd_pos(unsigned char x, unsigned char y) { unsigned char c[2]; c[0] = 0x80 | x; c[1] = 0x40 | y; lcd_send(c, sizeof(c), lcd_command); } void lcd_clear(unsigned char x) { lcd_home(); lcd_send(&x, 504, lcd_data_repeat); lcd_home(); } void lcd_init(void) { static const unsigned char init[] = { 0x20 + 0x01, // function set - extended instructions enabled //0x80 + 64, // set vop (contrast) 0 - 127 0x80 + 66, // set vop (contrast) 0 - 127 0x04 + 0x02, // temperature control 0x10 + 0x03, // set bias system 0x20 + 0x00, // function set - chip active, horizontal addressing, basic instructions 0x08 + 0x04 // display control - normal mode }; P1REN = RXD | SWITCH; P1DIR = LCD_CLK | LCD_BACKLIGHT | LCD_DATA; P1OUT = LCD_CLK | RXD | SWITCH | LCD_BACKLIGHT; P2REN = 0; P2DIR = LCD_DC | LCD_CE; P2OUT = LCD_CE; __delay_cycles(20000); P2OUT |= LCD_DC; __delay_cycles(20000); lcd_send(init, sizeof(init), lcd_command); } static const unsigned char font6x8[96][5] = { 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, // 20 32 0x00, 0x00, 0x5F, 0x00, 0x00, // 21 33 ! 0x00, 0x07, 0x00, 0x07, 0x00, // 22 34 " 0x14, 0x7F, 0x14, 0x7F, 0x14, // 23 35 # 0x24, 0x2A, 0x7F, 0x2A, 0x12, // 24 36 $ 0x23, 0x13, 0x08, 0x64, 0x62, // 25 37 % 0x36, 0x49, 0x56, 0x20, 0x50, // 26 38 & 0x00, 0x08, 0x07, 0x03, 0x00, // 27 39 ' 0x00, 0x1C, 0x22, 0x41, 0x00, // 28 40 ( 0x00, 0x41, 0x22, 0x1C, 0x00, // 29 41 ) 0x2A, 0x1C, 0x7F, 0x1C, 0x2A, // 2A 42 * 0x08, 0x08, 0x3E, 0x08, 0x08, // 2B 43 + 0x00, 0x40, 0x38, 0x18, 0x00, // 2C 44 , 0x08, 0x08, 0x08, 0x08, 0x08, // 2D 45 - 0x00, 0x00, 0x60, 0x60, 0x00, // 2E 46 . 0x20, 0x10, 0x08, 0x04, 0x02, // 2F 47 / 0x3E, 0x51, 0x49, 0x45, 0x3E, // 30 48 0 0x00, 0x42, 0x7F, 0x40, 0x00, // 31 49 1 0x42, 0x61, 0x51, 0x49, 0x46, // 32 50 2 0x21, 0x41, 0x49, 0x4D, 0x33, // 33 51 3 0x18, 0x14, 0x12, 0x7F, 0x10, // 34 52 4 0x27, 0x45, 0x45, 0x45, 0x39, // 35 53 5 0x3C, 0x4A, 0x49, 0x49, 0x30, // 36 54 6 0x41, 0x21, 0x11, 0x09, 0x07, // 37 55 7 0x36, 0x49, 0x49, 0x49, 0x36, // 38 56 8 0x06, 0x49, 0x49, 0x29, 0x1E, // 39 57 9 0x00, 0x00, 0x14, 0x00, 0x00, // 3A 58 : 0x00, 0x00, 0x40, 0x34, 0x00, // 3B 59 ; 0x00, 0x08, 0x14, 0x22, 0x41, // 3C 60 < 0x14, 0x14, 0x14, 0x14, 0x14, // 3D 61 = 0x00, 0x41, 0x22, 0x14, 0x08, // 3E 62 > 0x02, 0x01, 0x51, 0x09, 0x06, // 3F 63 ? 0x3E, 0x41, 0x5D, 0x59, 0x4E, // 40 64 @ 0x7C, 0x12, 0x11, 0x12, 0x7C, // 41 65 A 0x7F, 0x49, 0x49, 0x49, 0x36, // 42 66 B 0x3E, 0x41, 0x41, 0x41, 0x22, // 43 67 C 0x7F, 0x41, 0x41, 0x41, 0x3E, // 44 68 D 0x7F, 0x49, 0x49, 0x49, 0x41, // 45 69 E 0x7F, 0x09, 0x09, 0x09, 0x01, // 46 70 F 0x3E, 0x41, 0x49, 0x49, 0x7A, // 47 71 G 0x7F, 0x08, 0x08, 0x08, 0x7F, // 48 72 H 0x00, 0x41, 0x7F, 0x41, 0x00, // 49 73 I 0x20, 0x40, 0x41, 0x3F, 0x01, // 4A 74 J 0x7F, 0x08, 0x14, 0x22, 0x41, // 4B 75 K 0x7F, 0x40, 0x40, 0x40, 0x40, // 4C 76 L 0x7F, 0x02, 0x1C, 0x02, 0x7F, // 4D 77 M 0x7F, 0x04, 0x08, 0x10, 0x7F, // 4E 78 N 0x3E, 0x41, 0x41, 0x41, 0x3E, // 4F 79 O 0x7F, 0x09, 0x09, 0x09, 0x06, // 50 80 P 0x3E, 0x41, 0x51, 0x21, 0x5E, // 51 81 Q 0x7F, 0x09, 0x19, 0x29, 0x46, // 52 82 R 0x26, 0x49, 0x49, 0x49, 0x32, // 53 83 S 0x01, 0x01, 0x7F, 0x01, 0x01, // 54 84 T 0x3F, 0x40, 0x40, 0x40, 0x3F, // 55 85 U 0x1F, 0x20, 0x40, 0x20, 0x1F, // 56 86 V 0x3F, 0x40, 0x38, 0x40, 0x3F, // 57 87 W 0x63, 0x14, 0x08, 0x14, 0x63, // 58 88 X 0x03, 0x04, 0x78, 0x04, 0x03, // 59 89 Y 0x61, 0x51, 0x49, 0x45, 0x43, // 5A 90 Z 0x00, 0x7F, 0x41, 0x41, 0x41, // 5B 91 [ 0x02, 0x04, 0x08, 0x10, 0x20, // 5C 92 '\' 0x00, 0x41, 0x41, 0x41, 0x7F, // 5D 93 ] 0x04, 0x02, 0x01, 0x02, 0x04, // 5E 94 ^ 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, // 5F 95 _ 0x00, 0x03, 0x07, 0x08, 0x00, // 60 96 ' 0x20, 0x54, 0x54, 0x54, 0x78, // 61 97 a 0x7F, 0x28, 0x44, 0x44, 0x38, // 62 98 b 0x38, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x28, // 63 99 c 0x38, 0x44, 0x44, 0x28, 0x7F, // 64 100 d 0x38, 0x54, 0x54, 0x54, 0x18, // 65 101 e 0x00, 0x08, 0x7E, 0x09, 0x02, // 66 102 f 0x18, 0xA4, 0xA4, 0xA4, 0x7C, // 67 103 g 0x7F, 0x08, 0x04, 0x04, 0x78, // 68 104 h 0x00, 0x44, 0x7D, 0x40, 0x00, // 69 105 i 0x00, 0x20, 0x40, 0x40, 0x3D, // 6A 106 j 0x00, 0x7F, 0x10, 0x28, 0x44, // 6B 107 k 0x00, 0x41, 0x7F, 0x40, 0x00, // 6C 108 l 0x7C, 0x04, 0x78, 0x04, 0x78, // 6D 109 m 0x7C, 0x08, 0x04, 0x04, 0x78, // 6E 110 n 0x38, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x38, // 6F 111 o 0xFC, 0x18, 0x24, 0x24, 0x18, // 70 112 p 0x18, 0x24, 0x24, 0x18, 0xFC, // 71 113 q 0x7C, 0x08, 0x04, 0x04, 0x08, // 72 114 r 0x48, 0x54, 0x54, 0x54, 0x24, // 73 115 s 0x04, 0x04, 0x3F, 0x44, 0x24, // 74 116 t 0x3C, 0x40, 0x40, 0x20, 0x7C, // 75 117 u 0x1C, 0x20, 0x40, 0x20, 0x1C, // 76 118 v 0x3C, 0x40, 0x30, 0x40, 0x3C, // 77 119 w 0x44, 0x28, 0x10, 0x28, 0x44, // 78 120 x 0x4C, 0x90, 0x90, 0x90, 0x7C, // 79 121 y 0x44, 0x64, 0x54, 0x4C, 0x44, // 7A 122 z 0x00, 0x08, 0x36, 0x41, 0x00, // 7B 123 { 0x00, 0x00, 0x77, 0x00, 0x00, // 7C 124 | 0x00, 0x41, 0x36, 0x08, 0x00, // 7D 125 } 0x02, 0x01, 0x02, 0x04, 0x02, // 7E 126 ~ 0x00, 0x06, 0x09, 0x09, 0x06, // 7F 127 degrees }; void lcd_print(char *s, unsigned x, unsigned y) { unsigned char c[2]; c[0] = 0x80 | x; c[1] = 0x40 | y; lcd_send(c, sizeof(c), lcd_command); while(*s) { lcd_send(&font6x8[*s - 32][0], 5, lcd_data); lcd_send(&font6x8[0][0], 1, lcd_data); ++s; } } static const unsigned char num11x16[19][11 * 2] = { 0x00,0xF0,0xFC,0xFE,0x06,0x02,0x06,0xFE,0xFC,0xF0,0x00, // 0 0x00,0x07,0x1F,0x3F,0x30,0x20,0x30,0x3F,0x1F,0x07,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x08,0x0C,0xFC,0xFE,0xFE,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, // 1 0x00,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x3F,0x3F,0x3F,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x00, 0x00,0x0C,0x0E,0x06,0x02,0x02,0x86,0xFE,0x7C,0x38,0x00, // 2 0x00,0x30,0x38,0x3C,0x36,0x33,0x31,0x30,0x30,0x38,0x00, 0x00,0x0C,0x0E,0x86,0x82,0x82,0xC6,0xFE,0x7C,0x38,0x00, // 3 0x00,0x18,0x38,0x30,0x20,0x20,0x31,0x3F,0x1F,0x0E,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0xC0,0x20,0x18,0x04,0xFE,0xFE,0xFE,0x00,0x00, // 4 0x00,0x03,0x02,0x02,0x02,0x22,0x3F,0x3F,0x3F,0x22,0x02, 0x00,0x00,0x7E,0x7E,0x46,0x46,0xC6,0xC6,0x86,0x00,0x00, // 5 0x00,0x18,0x38,0x30,0x20,0x20,0x30,0x3F,0x1F,0x0F,0x00, 0x00,0xC0,0xF0,0xF8,0xFC,0x4C,0xC6,0xC2,0x82,0x00,0x00, // 6 0x00,0x0F,0x1F,0x3F,0x30,0x20,0x30,0x3F,0x1F,0x0F,0x00, 0x00,0x06,0x06,0x06,0x06,0x06,0xC6,0xF6,0x3E,0x0E,0x00, // 7 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x30,0x3C,0x0F,0x03,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x38,0x7C,0xFE,0xC6,0x82,0xC6,0xFE,0x7C,0x38,0x00, // 8 0x00,0x0E,0x1F,0x3F,0x31,0x20,0x31,0x3F,0x1F,0x0E,0x00, 0x00,0x78,0xFC,0xFE,0x86,0x02,0x86,0xFE,0xFC,0xF8,0x00, // 9 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x21,0x21,0x31,0x1D,0x1F,0x0F,0x03,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, // 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x70,0x70,0x70,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, // : 0x00,0x0E,0x0E,0x0E,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, // . 0x00,0x38,0x38,0x38,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0xC0,0x30,0x0C,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, // / 0x00,0x30,0x0C,0x03,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80, // - 0x00,0x01,0x01,0x01,0x01,0x01,0x01,0x01,0x01,0x01,0x01, 0x00,0x18,0x3C,0x66,0x66,0x3C,0x18,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, // 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0xF0,0xF8,0x0C,0x06,0x02,0x02,0x02,0x02,0x0E,0x0C,0x00, // C 0x03,0x07,0x0C,0x18,0x10,0x10,0x10,0x10,0x1C,0x0C,0x00, 0xFE,0xFE,0x42,0x42,0x42,0x42,0x42,0x42,0x00,0x00,0x00, // F 0x1F,0x1F,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0xFE,0xFE,0x40,0xE0,0xB0,0x18,0x0C,0x06,0x02,0x00,0x00, // K 0x1F,0x1F,0x00,0x00,0x01,0x03,0x06,0x0C,0x18,0x10,0x00 }; void pd12(unsigned n, unsigned x, unsigned y) { unsigned char c[2]; c[0] = 0x80 | x; c[1] = 0x40 + y; lcd_send(c, 2, lcd_command); lcd_send(num11x16[n], 11, lcd_data); c[1] = 0x41 + y; lcd_send(c, 2, lcd_command); lcd_send(num11x16[n] + 11, 11, lcd_data); }
  4. Like
    link reacted to VMM in Another 430 Watch   
    Well, it's up and running.  All the hardware seems to check out.  Display and accelerometer are playing nice on a shared spi bus.  The FR5738 RTC is keeping time.  LIS3DH initialized and generating interrupts properly.  Lots of programming to do now for the interface, calibrations, etc.

  5. Like
    link reacted to oPossum in Tiny printf() - C version   
    This is a tiny printf() function that can be used with the chips that come with the Launchpad. Code size is about 640 bytes with CCS.
     
    There are 7 format specifiers:
    %c - Character
    %s - String
    %i - signed Integer (16 bit)
    %u - Unsigned integer (16 bit)
    %l - signed Long (32 bit)
    %n - uNsigned loNg (32 bit)
    %x - heXadecimal (16 bit)
     
    Field width, floating point and other standard printf() features are not supported.
     
    printf() code

    #include "msp430g2231.h" #include "stdarg.h" void putc(unsigned); void puts(char *); static const unsigned long dv[] = { // 4294967296 // 32 bit unsigned max 1000000000, // +0 100000000, // +1 10000000, // +2 1000000, // +3 100000, // +4 // 65535 // 16 bit unsigned max 10000, // +5 1000, // +6 100, // +7 10, // +8 1, // +9 }; static void xtoa(unsigned long x, const unsigned long *dp) { char c; unsigned long d; if(x) { while(x < *dp) ++dp; do { d = *dp++; c = '0'; while(x >= d) ++c, x -= d; putc(c); } while(!(d & 1)); } else putc('0'); } static void puth(unsigned n) { static const char hex[16] = { '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','A','B','C','D','E','F'}; putc(hex[n & 15]); } void printf(char *format, ...) { char c; int i; long n; va_list a; va_start(a, format); while(c = *format++) { if(c == '%') { switch(c = *format++) { case 's': // String puts(va_arg(a, char*)); break; case 'c': // Char putc(va_arg(a, char)); break; case 'i': // 16 bit Integer case 'u': // 16 bit Unsigned i = va_arg(a, int); if(c == 'i' && i < 0) i = -i, putc('-'); xtoa((unsigned)i, dv + 5); break; case 'l': // 32 bit Long case 'n': // 32 bit uNsigned loNg n = va_arg(a, long); if(c == 'l' && n < 0) n = -n, putc('-'); xtoa((unsigned long)n, dv); break; case 'x': // 16 bit heXadecimal i = va_arg(a, int); puth(i >> 12); puth(i >> 8); puth(i >> 4); puth(i); break; case 0: return; default: goto bad_fmt; } } else bad_fmt: putc(c); } va_end(a); }
     
    test code

    #include "msp430g2231.h" void serial_setup(unsigned out_mask, unsigned in_mask, unsigned duration); void printf(char *, ...); void main(void) { char *s; char c; int i; unsigned u; long int l; long unsigned n; unsigned x; // Disable watchdog WDTCTL = WDTPW + WDTHOLD; // Use 1 MHz DCO factory calibration DCOCTL = 0; BCSCTL1 = CALBC1_1MHZ; DCOCTL = CALDCO_1MHZ; // Setup the serial port // Serial out: P1.1 (BIT1) // Serial in: P1.2 (BIT2) // Bit rate: 9600 (CPU freq / bit rate) serial_setup(BIT1, BIT2, 1000000 / 9600); printf("%s", "\r\n*** printf() test ***\r\n"); s = "test"; c = 'X'; i = -12345; u = 12345; l = -1234567890; n = 1234567890; x = 0xABCD; printf("String %s\r\n", s); printf("Char %c\r\n", c); printf("Integer %i\r\n", i); printf("Unsigned %u\r\n", u); printf("Long %l\r\n", l); printf("uNsigned loNg %n\r\n", n); printf("heX %x\r\n", x); printf("multiple args %s %c %i %u %l %n %x\r\n", s, c, i, u, l, n, x); printf("\r\n*** Done ***\r\n"); for(;; }

  6. Like
    link reacted to JWoodrell in Yep... Just yep... :)   
    My sister sent me this, thought you guys would enjoy this

  7. Like
    link reacted to VMM in Another 430 Watch   
    i've been working on this a bit more.  i hope to build another one soon.  in the mean time, here is a sneak peek:

  8. Like
    link reacted to Funklord in Moon Shoot game for the ez430 Chronos wristwatch   
    No, sorry what info do you need?
    I can add it here.
     
    Sounds like bugs in flash, X11 and the kernel...
     
    It's similar to space invaders in that your ship moves back and forth at the bottom of the screen, and shoots at enemies that drop down from the top.
    Due to the limitations of having a 7-seg display, it's very hard to come up with a good concept and form of graphics that'd work.
  9. Like
    link got a reaction from multivac in The Cramp! 430 powered desktop crane lamp   
    I almost have no words... Great work!
     
    Enviado desde mi HTC Sensation Z710e usando Tapatalk 4 Beta
     
     
  10. Like
    link reacted to multivac in The Cramp! 430 powered desktop crane lamp   
    Hey guys, so I`ve been working on this project for a while now, and wanted to show it here because you are a cool bunch.
    if i mess up, the pics are too big, or  whatever, im sorry. let me know and ill fix it asap.
    the title is pretty explanatory so here are some pics of the thing, and the associated mess (if i actually manage to attach pictures correctly)



    i know there is nothing particularly interesting in this from the microcontroller point of view, but maybe someone will like it.
    its sort of based on a liebherr lr1750 crawler crane in case anyone is interested. it is controlled with an ir remote kindly donated to the project, mostly made from scrap from my junk bin and some chips i got from the VERY generous TI`s sample program. The base, for example, is made from an old hdd, and the hole thing is screwed to, and pivots around, the main bearing.




     
    Some stuff i had to buy though, like the leds.
    I was thinking what could I do with a lot of solid conductor wire i pulled from the walls in my house when i changed the [way too old] electrical installation. i thought a lattice structure would be fun, and i have to say, its amazing how rigid the thing got. i also wanted to do some switching led driver experimenting. I used a TI TPS61199 led driver with 32 "5050" leds, that have 3 chips per package, so its 96 leds in all, at 17 mA each. the leds are mounted on a structure that is supposed to resemble a section of Eero Saarinen`s twa flight center. a sort of rebar core type thingy for the roof.



    i wanted to do a solid thing for the lamp, but it proved somewhat hard, i still might though. I





  11. Like
    link reacted to juani_c in Launchpad+Accelerometer+Processing=Snake game!!!   
    I made this little project and wanted to share it. The code is mostly from "Half Duplex Software UART on the LaunchPad" by NJC, I just added the ADC parts I needed. The Processing application send first a "X" and the LP answer with the value from one of the axes, then send a "Y" and you get the value from the other axis. After that the soft update the snake position and repeat the process. In order to start the game you have to click on the START button (pretty obvious), you lose if the snake touchs any of the sides, also the length and speed increase as you eat the little boxes.
    The codes are far from perfect and can be improved. I'm making a little video (that actually took me almost the same amount of time I spent programming) and I'll upload it in a while.
     
     
    EDIT:here is the video
    Launchpad-Snake.rar
  12. Like
    link reacted to RobG in Wearable WS2812 Strip Controllers   
    You know it, flashy blinky attracts the crowd, so I am bringing all my LED strips with me
     

  13. Like
    link reacted to RobG in Saving data to flash on power down   
    Here is a simple solution to the problem I had, saving data when power goes down.
    There are two parts needed, a diode (1N4148) and a capacitor (~47uF.)
    The way it works, you isolate main power from MCU and connect capacitor on the MCU's side.
    One of the pins is connected to the main power and will trigger an interrupt.
    In the interrupt routine, we will be saving data to flash.
    This is a simple proof of concept, the final code should include low voltage detection for situations like dying battery.
     

     


     

    #include "msp430g2231.h" unsigned int data = 0; unsigned int * const savedDataPtr = (unsigned int *)(0x1000); void main(void) { WDTCTL = WDTPW + WDTHOLD; P1DIR &= ~BIT1; P1IE |= BIT1; P1IES |= BIT1; P1IFG &= ~BIT1; P1REN |= BIT1; P1OUT &= ~BIT1; P1DIR |= BIT0; P1OUT |= BIT0; data = *savedDataPtr; if(data == 0xFFFF) data = 100; unsigned int counter = data; _bis_SR_register(GIE); while(1) { counter = data; while(counter > 0) { _delay_cycles(1000); counter--; } P1OUT ^= BIT0; } } // Port 1 interrupt service routine #pragma vector=PORT1_VECTOR __interrupt void Port_1(void) { P1OUT &= ~BIT0; data += 100; // Save value FCTL2 = FWKEY + FSSEL0 + FN1; FCTL1 = FWKEY + ERASE; FCTL3 = FWKEY; *savedDataPtr = 0; FCTL1 = FWKEY + WRT; *savedDataPtr = data; FCTL1 = FWKEY; FCTL3 = FWKEY + LOCK; P1IFG &= ~BIT1; }
  14. Like
    link reacted to Samartist in Most Compact 8x8x8 LED Cube with G2553   
    This is an 8x8x8 LED cube, designed by me, i think its the most compact circuit i have ever seen on the internet regarding a cube of this size...



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