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yyrkoon

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  1. Like
    yyrkoon got a reaction from Fred in Personal CNC PCB routers   
    This is what we ended up getting: http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/262624817100?lpid=82&chn=ps&ul_noapp=true or, something very similar. We're still not sure if we'll use it for many PCB's, but we do want it for various other milling jobs.
     
    Now as for the pick and place machine . . . my buddy decided to make his own, and it'll be huge for a DiY pick and place machine. He's already started to amass parts for it, and assembling it somewhat.
     
    We've got it setup with Mach3, and have done a few dry(demo) runs with it so far. Needed a lot of work to get it functional, and setup properly . . . 
  2. Like
    yyrkoon got a reaction from bluehash in Beaglebone-Web-PMIC-Register-Viewer   
    *whew* 3 days of *tedious* plodding along, and 3-4 rewrites mid-stream, I finally have something that works, but probably needs a serious UX overhaul. Technical wise, it's pretty cool and fetches register values in real-time very quickly through socket.io. This project uses https://github.com/wphermans/Nodejs-AS as it's base, and slightly modified https://github.com/wphermans/Bonejs/blob/master/i2c.js. For the later, it's just hard coded device, and i2c base address. If I remember correctly. Tired of looking at code for a day or two . . .
     
    Project:  https://github.com/wphermans/Beaglebone-Web-PMIC-Register-Viewer
  3. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to enl in Personal CNC PCB routers   
    I have been through a number of generations of in house prototype and hobby scale small volume, and if I can avoid it, I don't do it myself. That said, I don't make a lot of boards anymore, so there is a large grain of salt involved when I say that, with a little care, prototyping on a mill can be viable. It is what I do most of the time these days, as I have the equipment. It isn't as fast as photo, or even toner transfer. There is a mess involved unless dust collection is dead on-- handling the fibreglass dust is a different league than chips and dust from pretty much any other material. What follows is off the top of my head and based on my (probably somewhat outdated) experience.
     
    Positives include consistent trace width-- UV is also good, but requires good technique or results can get pretty bad--, no shorts or opens like plague toner transfer and sloppy UV, lower cost than UV if the equipment is already in house, the afore-mentioned alignment positives, no second setup for drilling, and no wet chem. Double sided isn't a big deal with proper use of alignment holes or fixtures, and other in house methods have similar issues.
     
    Negatives are dust control, through hole plating (which is the same for most other in house methods), board properties, workholding issues, and leveling.
     
    The key to good results is flat and level. A vacuum hold down on a flat bed it pretty much a dead requirement for good results, and accepting that the bed is going to need replacement periodically due to drill damage is a part of it.. If the bed is dead on, then the feature size can be quite good using a 90 degree point tool for the fine work-- depth controls width between close features. I run two tools for clearing: a 90 deg point for outlines and separation of close features (depth controls cut width), and a 0.75mm bullnose for larger area clearing and wide clearance, followed by a drill bit. If the board isn't held dead flat and level, the results will be bad, with nonuniform feature widths and variable substrate thickness between traces. I use a plugin for Eagle to generate the G-code.
     
    I would say that the biggest drawback to milling prototypes involving high frequency devices is the change in substrate properties due to the substrate removal, both due to dielectric loss and due to increased moisture pickup. I have never had a major issue, since I have never milled when I anticipated an issue, but I have seen the effects in a few cases and needed to adjust component values to compensate. The key thing is that the prototype board may have characteristics very different from the production board.
     
    That said, I don't recommend milling unless there is a compelling reason. For the few boards I do that way, it is ok, and 0.2mm traces on 0.5mm centers is very achievable. I prefer to use a service since I can usually wait. In a pinch, for something simple, I might even use a sharpie and etch, though that is last resort. I can do 0.5mm trace on 1.2 centerlines that way, which is fine for a lot of one-off, since I still use as much 0.1" (2.54mm) lead space devices as I can. I'm old and have poor eyesight. 10 sec with pliers and through hole devices are surface mount.
  4. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to bluehash in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    We use the Nimbelink for some of our projects and conferences. We have the Ethernet to Cellular E2CLink.
    Cost is crazy and it is not in any production equipment.
     
    I asked because you mentioned remote. BT/Wi-Fi/Sub 1Ghz are all nearfield.
    I get where you are going though. If the BBB has trouble doing all the stuff mentioned in the first post, another way to get around that is to use a micro connected in serial managing the BBB./PMIC/Battery/RTC. The downside is more code development, another processor family, board space+BOM count.
     
    Maybe an application note using any of the widely used Telit GSM modules will be a good starter/reference.
  5. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to bluehash in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    I think the board will have a great success, if you can pair it up with a real world application... and that application is interfacing your daughtercard to a GSM module(whether USB or using serial -I2C/SPI). Good luck!
    $24.99 is a sweet spot, price wise for BBB peripherals.
  6. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to spirilis in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    I think having specific support on the board for "daughterboards" providing advanced power support is a great idea.  A pinout giving access to 5V, GND, maybe 3.3V, and I2C along with perhaps a GPIO or 2 (maybe for the circuitry to "interrupt" the Sitara without requiring I2C polling?)
  7. Like
    yyrkoon got a reaction from bluehash in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    This is pretty much what we're doing already, except the solution is not all in one chip. Connectivity is all via I2C though. Which I still have to work out in code for the msp430, For the board we just did a production run on, we did not use I2C. Just a single GPIO, and a toggle count to enable the watchdog feature. It's actually pretty awesome for me to watch it working, as the very first time I ran it it caught, and dealt with a failed boot on the beaglebone. Which is of course why I came up with this idea to begin with. The rest of the features I added after observing the beaglebone in action for 3 and a half years, while noticing 'minor' flaws. Minor as in they are minor flaws, until you actually need the board to go into a production system. Then they become serious flaws.
     
    The real cool thing is that none of this requires anything special on the beaglebone to function correctly. Software wise. You can even run all of this without any special drivers on the beaglebone side. It's a simple matter of connecting these devices to an I2C bus, and using i2c-tools utilities if the user so wishes. However, Linux also has a 'built-in' driver for the ds3232 RTC, which is fairly handy, and really simple to use too.
     
    Anyway, it is my hope to keep costs below $25 per board if possible. The more features added however . . .will increase the cost, of course. Which is why I think adding power switching circuitry is not necessarily a good idea. Regulating a wide range input, maybe. However, with that said, perhaps something like an 'add-on' could work ? I'm kind of envisioning something like a grove connector, that would allow inexpensive add-ons via an i2c bus( for control ).
     
    EDIT:
     
    @@bluehash I was talkign with a friend of mine about cell phone dongles, and he claims that there are USB dongles that cost less than $20. I have not looked into this myself, but if they truly do exist in this price range. It then becomes a simple matter of "bullet proofing" the software ? I'll look into it.
  8. Like
    yyrkoon got a reaction from spirilis in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    This is pretty much what we're doing already, except the solution is not all in one chip. Connectivity is all via I2C though. Which I still have to work out in code for the msp430, For the board we just did a production run on, we did not use I2C. Just a single GPIO, and a toggle count to enable the watchdog feature. It's actually pretty awesome for me to watch it working, as the very first time I ran it it caught, and dealt with a failed boot on the beaglebone. Which is of course why I came up with this idea to begin with. The rest of the features I added after observing the beaglebone in action for 3 and a half years, while noticing 'minor' flaws. Minor as in they are minor flaws, until you actually need the board to go into a production system. Then they become serious flaws.
     
    The real cool thing is that none of this requires anything special on the beaglebone to function correctly. Software wise. You can even run all of this without any special drivers on the beaglebone side. It's a simple matter of connecting these devices to an I2C bus, and using i2c-tools utilities if the user so wishes. However, Linux also has a 'built-in' driver for the ds3232 RTC, which is fairly handy, and really simple to use too.
     
    Anyway, it is my hope to keep costs below $25 per board if possible. The more features added however . . .will increase the cost, of course. Which is why I think adding power switching circuitry is not necessarily a good idea. Regulating a wide range input, maybe. However, with that said, perhaps something like an 'add-on' could work ? I'm kind of envisioning something like a grove connector, that would allow inexpensive add-ons via an i2c bus( for control ).
     
    EDIT:
     
    @@bluehash I was talkign with a friend of mine about cell phone dongles, and he claims that there are USB dongles that cost less than $20. I have not looked into this myself, but if they truly do exist in this price range. It then becomes a simple matter of "bullet proofing" the software ? I'll look into it.
  9. Like
    yyrkoon got a reaction from bluehash in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    One idea we were kicking around with today. Was *maybe* a "regulator" addition. That is imagine a remote site with a 12v solar panel, and a 12v deep cycle for providing long term power. A design could include a 12v, or even a wide DC input voltage regulator to 5v power for the beaglebone. Kind of like a UPS, as our cape already uses a 3.7v LiPO. But I could see a potentially large need for this design in the scientific crowd ( extreme remote site data acquisition ) We could even design a solar charge controller into such a cape . . .
  10. Like
    yyrkoon got a reaction from bluehash in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    @@bluehash here ya go: http://nimbelink.com/skywire-beaglebone-black-modem/
     
    But like I said in my last post. The cost of that cape is ridiculous in my mind. Cost is twice the cost of a beeaglobone( $110US from Digikey ). Also I've talked with someone who has used one. It uses some sort of hokey UART USB gadget interface. But I guess if you *REALLY* need one . . .
  11. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to greeeg in Personal CNC PCB routers   
    @@yyrkoon
     
    Double sided alignment - I believe that you can use some form of holes and pins to re-align the PCB. This may have gotten better, but I never had a good workflow. Your CNC probably needs a nice fixture plate to make this reliable. Plated Through holes - Fair, enough. (This is a show stopper for me) Small SMT parts - I haven't seen a milled PCB that went below 0.65mm pitch TTSOPs. You should be fine for SMT passives. Commercial solutions - I was talking about a commercial PCB prototype plotter. My only experience was with this (http://www.lpkf.com/products/rapid-pcb-prototyping/circuit-board-plotter/protomat-s63.htm) (From memory, roughly a $20K machine.) Prototype being different from final design increases the total time spent designing, and if you're using high speed signals (USB, LVDS, 50 Ohm transmission lines) Really depend on the design and board geometry. I feel like I'm in the same boat as @Fred, And my opinion is biased against cheap in-house prototyping. Personally fabricating PCBs is not fun for me, designing / assembling and testing are the parts I find fun. So I'm more than happy to pay for someone else to do it reliably and work on another aspect of the project while I wait.
     
    I really like the results from @terjeio's laser plotter, I think that's a much better solution than milling.
  12. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to Fred in Personal CNC PCB routers   
    I didn't find milling PCBs to be very effective. It was OK for through hole stuff but for anything finer it was too difficult to get good results. The only plus was the fact that the isolation routing and drilling always lined up perfectly.
     
    I got on much better with photoresist, with results similar to terjeio's above. It was fun but I realised it would often take me two weeks to find the few free hours I needed for etching, so no real time saving in the end. Do it if you enjoy it and like the challenge, not to save time or money.
     
    CNC milling is however great for making enclosures and random stuff like that.
  13. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to terjeio in Personal CNC PCB routers   
    I agree with greeg too, I did not even try to mill PCBs even if I own a CNC mill - dismissed out of hand due to poor resolution,  cumbersome setup and involved workflow. However, for single sided designs I am very happy with my laser exposer now that I have mastered the process.
     

     
    This PCB took 1h30min to make from plotting (from KiCad) to developed soldermask. It then needs one hour in the reflow oven for "hardening" the soldermask before drilling and milling the edges  (I am using Mach3 for my mill). The soldermask is not perfect - most likely due to it beeing way past it "best before" date. BTW the footprint in the middle is for a 2553.
     
    "Inexpensive"? - for me, yes - as I make quite a few one-offs and small runs (typically < 5).
  14. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to Fred in Personal CNC PCB routers   
    I agree with greeeg. I went from CNC milled PCBs to presensitized photoresist boards to DirtyPCBs. CNC is great but for many things not really for PCBs.
  15. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to greeeg in Personal CNC PCB routers   
    My personal opinion is not worth it. Based on the following points
    Double sided boards are not easy No plated through holes Most of my designs are fully SMD (0603 or smaller) often with QFNs or TTSOPs DIY setups require ALOT of time to tune/setup Commercial solutions are VERY expensive (paying for the time to develop a reliable machine) Minimum space is size of cutting bit (typically >0.4mm) No soldermask Prototyped designs are significantly different to Fabbed designs This might seem like I'm complaining about things that don't matter. But if you compare a milled PCB and a professionally fabbed PCB from a batch Chinese service, they're worlds apart.
     
    I've played with Toner transfer, photosensitive ink transfer, and milled PCBs. Out of all photo-sensitive was the best most repeatable, but my lab space is not setup for making PCBs. It just takes me too long to setup and pack down all the equipment. Photo-sensitive has the advantage that the same process repeated will give you a solder mask.
     
    We have a LPRF ProMat S63 at uni, it's an amazing machine. But the upfront cost and cost for PCB blanks and operating costs (broken bits mostly) don't make it an attractive offer. I would much rather timeline a 5 day wait for PCBs from china into my projects.
     
    Just my thoughts, If your prototypes are primarily single side, with larger components. Or if you use alot of through hole parts. It should be a good fit.
  16. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to spirilis in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    I never bothered to follow up with my idea below but I do think a switching regulator for 12V (maybe modifiable to work up to 60Vin for flexibility with different offgrid DC power systems) is a good idea.
     
    I designed and built one copy of a 12VDC PFET power MOSFET cape which had an off-the-shelf 12V (7-36Vin) to 5V out switcher onboard. It worked great. I highly recommend including one for your design.
     
    The idea behind my cape is 12V could be switched on/off to up to four outputs for remotely controlling power for various sub-5A sources e.g. a low flow pump. The beaglebone is powered by the same 12V source obviously.
  17. Like
    yyrkoon got a reaction from spirilis in Who is using rPI ?   
    I've answered a lot of beaglebone questions in the last 3.5+ years. I've not always been nice about it. A character flaw that some times gets the best of me I guess. My mentality of that is if a person is not going to put forth the energy to do what they want done - Why should I ? However, I do understand that it can be frustrating to try and get something done. Especially, for instance if you've been using Debian for many years. I'm sure you understand the concept of "Debian without systemd" As in, I already know how to do that with sysv, why would I want to learn something new ?
     
    Then I also forget that I've been using Debian since the 90's( sometimes in spurts ). . . while many of these people barely even know what Linux *is*.
  18. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to SteveR in Who is using rPI ?   
    Yeah, if you look at the home page the avg reputation is less than 100, and most of them are 1 - which means they have never had an account on any of the stackexchange sites. It is the nature of the beast with noobs, personally I think the bigger issue is they don't know how to ask a good question - since they have never done it. So they often get more questions/requests for more info than answers. Overall we try and help anyone who comes along without using RTFM.
  19. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to SteveR in Who is using rPI ?   
    No this is me.
  20. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to SteveR in Who is using rPI ?   
    I have 11 and a twelfth on the way. I am also one of the mods on Stack Exchanges' Pi specific site. I use my Pi's to run my information dashboard, build light, and I am currently working on a bench cam that will move left to right above the bench as well as pan and tilt.
  21. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to SteveR in Who is using rPI ?   
    Depending on the speed you need you can use a:
     
    USB WiFi dongle, 
    USB to Ethernet adapter,
    serial to Ethernet adapter, or an
    ESP8266.
     
    The first two will need an adapter or USB OTG cable, and may require a powered hub to work reliably. There are also several boards like this one that add standard USB ports to the Pi (they use pogo pins), which would not require the OTG cable/adapter.
    The last two will require you to solder wires or pins to connect them to the GPIO pins, and will be much slower.
     
    As for the IoT HAT mentioned by Rei Vilo, I have one of these and it can be ordered without the female header, which would allow using stacking headers thus gaining access to the unused GPIO pins. 
  22. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to spirilis in Who is using rPI ?   
    Just got my RPi3 and had a chance to play with it today.  Stupidly simple to set up... a simple uncommenting of lines in /boot/config.txt to enable SPI, I2C, I2S etc.
     
    The bcm2835 library seems to support hitting SPI et al from C easily enough.  http://www.airspayce.com/mikem/bcm2835/
    So it's easy to get started with and stupidly simple for any reasonably experienced Linux admin to use.  The current Raspbian doesn't support the ARM Cortex-A53's 64-bit mode yet, so it runs in armv7l 32-bit mode, but it's still quad-core.
     
    Looks like the RPi foundation supports the GPGPU project for writing code that utilizes the GPU, and there are examples shipping for e.g. "hello_fft" accelerated by the GPU.  Since the GPU is supposed to be bomb-diggity fast on those BCM283x chips, that outta be a good frontier for more serious projects to consider especially e.g. DSP work.
  23. Like
    yyrkoon got a reaction from spirilis in CCS for $9.99   
    Oh, i totally get that aspect of it. But I guess that personally, I mainly only use the G2553, where the gcc port, and tools are very good. I'm sure that the TI toolchain has better optimization. But how important is that really for most projects ? I'm guessing that it's not all that important most of the time.
     
    But the reason why I'm mostly only interested in the G2553, is that if I need a low power MCU, the G2553 will work for most cases. The price per part is very good as well. But if I need more processing power, more pins, or peripherals, then I probably won't even consider using an MSP430. Instead I'd probably go with an ARM core, where there are many, many options. Including from TI, but not limited to TI parts.
  24. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to Rickta59 in gpio interrupts   
    The problem with using javascript it it doesn't know that your target environment is limited to 16 bit.  Try a different example, add 0xffff + 0x0001 .. 
     
     
    $ cat testme.js "use strict"; (function() { var BIT0 = 0x0001; var BIT5 = 0xffff; var test = (BIT0) + (BIT5); process.stdout.write('0x' +test.toString(16) + '\n'); })(); $ node testme.js 0x10000 $ Now try it with msp430-elf-gdb:
     
    $ msp430-elf-gdb -q (gdb) print/x 0xffff+0x0001 $1 = 0x0 (gdb)  So the answer with javascript is '0x10000' and the answer with msp430-elf-gdb is '0'. However for the msp430g2553 0 is the right answer.
     
    msp430-elf-gdb knows about C math and it knows about the size of integers on an msp430. Which when you start moving up the chain of msp430 parts it changes. The results also change depending on which compiler mode you are using, 16 bit for small model and 20 bits for large. 
     
    As long as you keep in mind that you have to turn the javascript results into 16 bit math you will be ok. But it is yet another thing to remember.
     
    -rick
  25. Like
    yyrkoon reacted to Rickta59 in gpio interrupts   
    More fun with gdb, try this with an MSP-EXP430G2 launchpad
     
    o Open 2 xterm or 2 command windows that have msp430-elf-gdb and mspdebug in your path
     
    o In the first xterm run: 

     $ mspdebug rf2500 'gdb'  o In the second xterm run an msp430-elf-gdb session

    $ msp430-elf-gdb -q -ex 'target remote :2000' Remote debugging using :2000 0x0000ffff in ?? () (gdb) printf "create convenience variables\n" create convenience variables (gdb) set $P1OUT=(unsigned char *)0x21 (gdb) set $P1DIR=(unsigned char *)0x22 (gdb) printf "set all the P1 pins low\n" set all the P1 pins low (gdb) set *$P1OUT=0 (gdb) printf "set all the P1 pins into output\n" set all the P1 pins into output (gdb) set *$P1DIR=0xff (gdb) printf "TURN on both LED pins (BIT0 and BIT6)\n" TURN on both LED pins (BIT0 and BIT6) (gdb) set *$P1OUT=((1<<0)|(1<<6)) (gdb) printf "TURN off the RED LED pin\n" TURN off the RED LED pin (gdb) set *$P1OUT=~((1<<0)) (gdb) printf "TURN on the RED LED and turn off the GREEN LED pin\n" TURN on the RED LED and turn off the GREEN LED pin (gdb) set *$P1OUT=((1<<0) | ~(1<<6)) (gdb) quit msp430-elf-gdb lets you read and write the Special function varialbles that control the ports. Using it interactively like this I'm not sure we even need a programming language All you need is a connection to mspdebug through msp430-elf-gdb (CCS supplied) or msp430-gdb (Energia supplied)-rick
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