Jump to content
43oh

ILAMtitan

Members
  • Content Count

    56
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to chicken in Registros P1IN y P1OUT del MSP430g2152 (Registers) Help   
    Looking at the port schematic in the datasheet, you can see that PxIN.y (i.e. bit y of port x) is directly connected to the pad (via a buffer).
     
    So I think by design P1IN always reflects the physical state of the pins, even for pins configured as output. However, changing the state of a pin via P1OUT is only possible when that pin is configured as output.
  2. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to tingo in First actual fried MSP430   
    Back in the days I worked for a electronics repair unit for the Army in my country.
    My "fireworks" memory: Two colleagues got to fix the "battery conditioner", a purpose built charge / discharge and measurement unit for all kinds of rechargeable batteries. This was a large rack-mounted unit, with 15 -20 or so "outputs" to connect batteries to. The control logic was all TTL, on many cards (probably Eurocard-sized). While doing fault-finding, they had the control unit partly disassembled on the workbench. They also had a few batteries there (probably to load the outputs). For some reason, they had the battery voltage from one battery on a test lead with a measuring probe on the end, this voltage was +55V dc... when one of them lost the probe, it dropped onto the +5V on one of the boards... there was a few seconds of fireworks, the there was black plastic bits (tops from TTL chips) all around several meters away, some of them burning.
     
    To avoid putting all the blame on someone else, my "finest moment" in those days was this: we had just received a new instrument from one of our suppliers, a fancy (and expensive) oscilloscope, logic analyzer or something. Me and a colleague was unpacking it, we couldn't get it out of the box fast enough, we wanted to plug it in and start playing with it. When it was out of the box and on the workbench, I grabbed the power cable, noticed it had the wrong plug (a UK plug), and simply grabbed another power cable, and plugged it in, without thinking about checking the 120 VAC / 230 VAC switch that all instruments had in these days. Naturally, the instrument lasted only two seconds after being turned on. The only thing to do was to pack it into the box again and return it to the supplier. (Of course the supplier should have changed this switch before sending us the instrument, but finding a power cable with a UK plug in the box should have warned me).
  3. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from KatiePier in First actual fried MSP430   
    You got off easy.  I do a lot of work with mains voltage, and learned my lesson about debugging without an isolated interface early on.  THis one blew out my laptop's dock as well in the process.
     

  4. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to enl in First actual fried MSP430   
    Back in the days of large cards covered with neat rows and columns of DIP IC's, mostly 7400 series and the occasional MSI or LSI (almost 50000 transistors! On one IC!!!), the card looked like little industrial cities when laying on the test bench, full of warehouses and factories. Power supplies were commonly pretty beefy-- my 5V bench supply is an old 30A Delta, with a big crowbar bolted to the outside (from the factory) and remote voltage sense lines-- and a failure could turn that nice clean postcard-picture factory city looking board into 1950's Pittsburgh in an instant. Stunk like crazy, but actually kinda neat seeing all of those little factories blasting smoke out of their roofs as turn silicon into slag.
     
    No pics (pre digital cam era last time I saw this), just memories.
     
    And we can't forget that when testing using a variac, plug the variac into the isolation transformer, not the bench outlet. Fortunately, GFCI for the bench, so no smoke, but it took me about an hour to figure out why hooking up the scope ground lead was popping the GFCI monday night. Bench computer was plugged into the iso tranformer outlet.....
  5. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from bluehash in First actual fried MSP430   
    It's the application control card for the system shown in the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cv9PRXx4cYs
    That whole board runs on mains, and mistakes happen during development.
  6. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from tripwire in First actual fried MSP430   
    One more fried board, courtesy of a colleague of mine.  I know it's not an MSP, but the LM3S parts make some pretty patterns when you hit with mains voltage.  Just another reminder to always triple check when working with HV.
     

  7. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from bluehash in First actual fried MSP430   
    One more fried board, courtesy of a colleague of mine.  I know it's not an MSP, but the LM3S parts make some pretty patterns when you hit with mains voltage.  Just another reminder to always triple check when working with HV.
     

  8. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from Automate in First actual fried MSP430   
    There are a couple options out there.
    Inline USB Isolation: http://www.bb-elec.com/Products/USB-Connectivity/USB-Isolators/USB-Isolators.aspx
    Isolated USB Hubs: http://www.sealevel.com/store/hub7i-optically-isolated-7-port-usb-hub.html
    Isolated FET: https://www.olimex.com/Products/MSP430/JTAG/MSP430-JTAG-ISO-MK2/
  9. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from GeekDoc in First actual fried MSP430   
    You got off easy.  I do a lot of work with mains voltage, and learned my lesson about debugging without an isolated interface early on.  THis one blew out my laptop's dock as well in the process.
     

  10. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from tsupplis in AFE Launchpad Board   
    I'm also interested to see how this is coming along.
    I work a lot with TI's e-meter designs, so I'm also curious to see how the rest of your open source e-meter is going.
     
    Drop me a line if you ever want a design review or any other help.
  11. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to rockets4kids in CCS vs Tiva   
    Although it wouldn't explain your problems, a lot of people have had issues with the on-line CCS installer.  It is always best to download the full off-line installer (the 1.5 GB one...) and install from that.
  12. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from bob in How do I debug Energia sketch on MSP430 launch pad   
    bob,
    The Energia environment is designed as a quick an dirty interface to program the MSP, and doesn't have full debug support.
    If you need a debugger, I recommend moving to CCSv5, or v6 like Rei Vilo pointed to.
  13. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to Rei Vilo in How do I debug Energia sketch on MSP430 launch pad   
    @@bob
     
    Give CCS6 a try. Although still in beta and buggy, it gives you an idea of what you can expect.
     
    CCSv6 can be downloaded from http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/CCSv6
     

  14. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from bluehash in DriverLib - worth using or not?   
    MSP430ware/DriverLib is intended to be used like TivaWare.  It's an abstraction layer that makes access to the part peripherals easier.  There are more functions in addition to that though , but you'll have to explore the examples for your device. It's a good start for beginners when using some of the more complex sub systems like USB.
     
    The only reason is gets a "meh" opinion is because it's not widely advertised or used yet.  If you know 430 well already, you probably won't get much out of it since it will likely disrupt your typically programing style, but those that are new to the part will find it a lot easier to use.  Most of the advanced users here likely won't use it, and that might be filtering through in advice.  At the very least, it's worth giving a try.
  15. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from bluehash in RF bootloader   
    We actually have an application note that outlines a wireless update system on the Fraunchpad.  Check it out: http://www.ti.com/lit/an/slaa511/slaa511.pdf
    I know the engineer who worked on this personally, so if you have any questions, let me know and I'll see what I can find out for you.
  16. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from spirilis in The Sub-1GHz BoosterPack for 2013/2014   
    Are you looking at the EMK?  I think all that's offered is the gerbers, which can be a pain to work with IMO.  If you go to the E2E page for Wireless Connectivity, there is a hardware sub group.  I know a lot of the engineers in the wireless teams check those and are usually pretty good about responding.
     
    I know those EMK boards are expensive (and I have no idea why), but if you do get them you can mate them to a launchpad using and adapter booster pack we sell now: http://www.ti.com/tool/boost-ccemadapter
    Regretiably, I don't know much about TI's sub 1GHz offerings, so I can't be too much more help.
  17. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to Fred in Vetinari's Clock   
    There's nothing wrong with a bit of percussive maintenance when it's required.
  18. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to JWoodrell in Vetinari's Clock   
    Kinetic recalibration?
  19. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to grahamf72 in Vetinari's Clock   
    Here's a little video of my version of your clock.
     

     
    Oh, and I forgot to mention in my previous post - I actually pasted your code direct into Energia, because for some reason my CCS is broken and won't start.  I was expecting a fairly major rewrite, but it turned out the only change I had to make was alter the definition of main() to be "int main(void)", apparently mspgcc is quite picky about that.  On Energia it compiled to be a mere 500 bytes. Curiously, changing the tick time from 0x4000 to 0x2000 reduced the compile size to 475 bytes, (0x2000 made my backwards problem worse though).  Increasing it to 0x4800 resulted in a compile size of 495 bytes. Obviously mspgcc is able to make some optimisations in __delay_cycles() depending on the value passed.  Because it is such a small code size, at some stage I might see if I can modify it to use a bit array instead of a byte array, so that the RAM requirement becomes small enough to use on a 2231.
  20. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to grahamf72 in Vetinari's Clock   
    Brilliant! I made a shameless copy of your design last night by modifying a $3 clock from KMart. It's tethered to my launchpad at the moment, but a standalone board with one of my spare 2452's will be in the  not-to-distant future. I would assume the crystal in the clock is 32.768kHz - the one on the clock board has nice long pins, so I'll solder it onto my standalone board to. It only took about half an hour to set this up. This morning, after about 12 hours, the clock is still running accurately. I did have to increase the energize time slightly - at the 0x4000 figure you used, I found the clock would occasionally start running backwards for a few ticks.  My clock doesn't give a very distinct tick - I'm thinking of adding a little speaker to make the tick a bit more noticeable.
    Thankyou so much for the idea - my office at work will shortly have a unique timepiece.
  21. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from KatiePier in Vetinari's Clock   
    I figured you guys might be interested in some of my tinkering with the Launchpad.  Hopefully by putting a few of my projects up here it will also keep me accountable for finishing them.
     
    This is one a cobbled together a few months ago.  It's been up on the MCU projects page on E2E, so you might have already seen it: http://e2e.ti.com/group/microcontrollerprojects/m/msp430microcontrollerprojects/664670.aspx
     
     
    PROJECT OVERVIEW
    The Vetinari clock is from a book series known as Discworld, where Lord Verinari has a clock in his waiting room which has an irregular tick. The idea of the clock is to add a sense of unease and anxiety to anyone in the waiting room since their brain doesn't filter out the ticks like a normal clock. Here's a video to get a better idea of the result.  The tick is actually a lot louder in person.
     


     
    SOFTWARE DESIGN
    To accomplish this task on a 430, we create an array of possible time frames to tick the clock, and parse through it at 4Hz. The array is 32 entries long, so it equates to 32 seconds in the real world. By randomly setting 32 of the elements high, we create a timing sequence. A high element will generate a tick of the clock. This means a second on the clock can be as little as 250ms, or as long as 24 seconds, and still keep accurate time.  Check the attached software too see how it's all done; I did my best to comment it up.  main.c
     
    HARDWARE DESIGN
    The clock coil is driven via an alternating polarity pulse.  The easiest way to change a load's polarity with an MCU is using an h-bridge.
     

     
    The schematic shown is a simple implementation using two NPN and two PNP transistors.  I had the transistors and drive resistors laying around, so this part was easy to cobble together (along with the half used battery holder).  It would be easy to use a single IO pin per side of the bridge, but the transistors fit better onto the launchpad, as shown in the image.  To add the driving resistors in series, I cut a small gap in the traces, scrapped off the solder mask on either side to make pads, and put down a small SMA resistor.  It's not pretty, but it works.
     

     
    In the clock mechanism, there is a small control board with a crystal and epoxy glob IC that normally runs the clock.  I just ripped that out and directly attached the coil to the h-bridge.
     

     
    The resulting clock is actually more maddening than I expected in a quiet environment.  By using 3V rather than the 1.5V that the original movement used, the ticks are much more pronounced and do an excellent job of ruining a person's calm.
  22. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from rampadc in Vetinari's Clock   
    I figured you guys might be interested in some of my tinkering with the Launchpad.  Hopefully by putting a few of my projects up here it will also keep me accountable for finishing them.
     
    This is one a cobbled together a few months ago.  It's been up on the MCU projects page on E2E, so you might have already seen it: http://e2e.ti.com/group/microcontrollerprojects/m/msp430microcontrollerprojects/664670.aspx
     
     
    PROJECT OVERVIEW
    The Vetinari clock is from a book series known as Discworld, where Lord Verinari has a clock in his waiting room which has an irregular tick. The idea of the clock is to add a sense of unease and anxiety to anyone in the waiting room since their brain doesn't filter out the ticks like a normal clock. Here's a video to get a better idea of the result.  The tick is actually a lot louder in person.
     


     
    SOFTWARE DESIGN
    To accomplish this task on a 430, we create an array of possible time frames to tick the clock, and parse through it at 4Hz. The array is 32 entries long, so it equates to 32 seconds in the real world. By randomly setting 32 of the elements high, we create a timing sequence. A high element will generate a tick of the clock. This means a second on the clock can be as little as 250ms, or as long as 24 seconds, and still keep accurate time.  Check the attached software too see how it's all done; I did my best to comment it up.  main.c
     
    HARDWARE DESIGN
    The clock coil is driven via an alternating polarity pulse.  The easiest way to change a load's polarity with an MCU is using an h-bridge.
     

     
    The schematic shown is a simple implementation using two NPN and two PNP transistors.  I had the transistors and drive resistors laying around, so this part was easy to cobble together (along with the half used battery holder).  It would be easy to use a single IO pin per side of the bridge, but the transistors fit better onto the launchpad, as shown in the image.  To add the driving resistors in series, I cut a small gap in the traces, scrapped off the solder mask on either side to make pads, and put down a small SMA resistor.  It's not pretty, but it works.
     

     
    In the clock mechanism, there is a small control board with a crystal and epoxy glob IC that normally runs the clock.  I just ripped that out and directly attached the coil to the h-bridge.
     

     
    The resulting clock is actually more maddening than I expected in a quiet environment.  By using 3V rather than the 1.5V that the original movement used, the ticks are much more pronounced and do an excellent job of ruining a person's calm.
  23. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to Mark Easley TI in Stellaris Line is now Tiva C & New Launchpad!   
    Yes, unfortunately it is a bit confusing, but TI is phasing out the Stellaris brand for several reasons.  One big one is it is hard to pronounce in Asia.  Tiva is easier to say and therefore easier to sell.  The Tiva brand will help propel our expanding ARM MCU portfolio in the near future.
     
    The current Tiva C LaunchPad is extremely similar to the Stellaris LaunchPad and should be cross compatible for the most part. As the Tiva brand expands over the next few quarters you will see quite a few changes from the former Stellaris lineup.  Hopefully this equates to better parts and higher customer satisfaction.
     
    Again apologies for the confusion. 
  24. Like
    ILAMtitan got a reaction from paulpthcom in Recommended AVcc supply for G2955?   
    I typically just decouple DVcc and AVcc with a low impedance resistor.  10ohms is typically good enough to reduce the noise carryover to an acceptable level for high performance analog applications.  Depending on the accuracy you need though, you may not have to even do that.
     
    Any reason for the extra 22uF cap?  The standard bulk and bypass caps should be sufficient for this part.
  25. Like
    ILAMtitan reacted to GeekDoc in Vetinari's Clock   
    The way you have the power hooked up, you could just remove all the jumpers and you would not be powering the emulator circuit.  Since you've modded this LP, might as well just do that and save battery.
     
    BTW: I've been dying to make one of these!
×
×
  • Create New...