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Lgbeno

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  1. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from bluehash in ESI Project: Water Usage Monitoring   
    Interesting project, I'm actually doing something similar with cc110l and msp430G2553. I call it "droplet". It runs off of a cr2450 battery, sleeps most of the time then wakes up sends measurements to a Hub that is wall powered and the hub ships the data to data.sparkfun.com. Here's the droplet:
     

     
    And here is a hub prototype (just ordered a real pcb for it)
     

     
    You can see the electric imp that receives data via uart the pushes it to sparkfun.
     
    My web app project imp.guru fetches the data from sparkfun to view, here's the data imp.guru/f1
     
     
    I'm willing to share any/all of this work for your project if interested. My recommendation would be to skip the whole energy harvesting thing and use batteries. With the right design you should last years on a pair of AA's.
     
    I've seen projects on hack a day where people use Hall effect sensors to pick up the spinning magnet in their utility water meter. I think this is it:
     
    http://hackaday.io/project/1460-Remote-Water-Consumption-Display
  2. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from CorB in ESI Project: Water Usage Monitoring   
    Interesting project, I'm actually doing something similar with cc110l and msp430G2553. I call it "droplet". It runs off of a cr2450 battery, sleeps most of the time then wakes up sends measurements to a Hub that is wall powered and the hub ships the data to data.sparkfun.com. Here's the droplet:
     

     
    And here is a hub prototype (just ordered a real pcb for it)
     

     
    You can see the electric imp that receives data via uart the pushes it to sparkfun.
     
    My web app project imp.guru fetches the data from sparkfun to view, here's the data imp.guru/f1
     
     
    I'm willing to share any/all of this work for your project if interested. My recommendation would be to skip the whole energy harvesting thing and use batteries. With the right design you should last years on a pair of AA's.
     
    I've seen projects on hack a day where people use Hall effect sensors to pick up the spinning magnet in their utility water meter. I think this is it:
     
    http://hackaday.io/project/1460-Remote-Water-Consumption-Display
  3. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from greeeg in Alternate MSP430 RF boards?   
    Thanks @@greeeg on Saturday I almost had a full post about it and then lost it. I will make another one tonight after I get the kids in bed
  4. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from reaper7 in [Energia Library] Software I2C Master for MSP430G2553   
    After quite a bit of testing, I think that I have some improvements for the version of software i2c in this thread.
     
    The changes that I made are:
    Support for Wire.endTransmission(false);
     
    Also I added support clock stretching during i2c reads.
     
     
    SoftwareSerial.zip
  5. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from abecedarian in ESI Project: Water Usage Monitoring   
    Interesting, definitely like the educational opportunities for the kids, better to learn this stuff then spend all of their time playing mine craft!
     
    Here's the details on droplet, the schematic ain't pretty but I didn't feel like spending time bringing it to a professional caliber.  I built up 6 of the original revision, found a few bugs taht were all fixed in this revision, it should be good to go.
     
    https://upverter.com/imp-guru/0609e08f25aa7f3d/Humidity--Temp-Guru/
     
    I just finished up the hub board, have not tested it yet
     
    https://upverter.com/imp-guru/84ba884b5851ecba/Imp-Guru-Sensor-Hub/
     
    The hub has the cc1190 frontend chip as well so I'm hoping for long range, we'll see what I can get.
     
    for either design you can click on "Download associated files" and grab a zip of the gerbers which are perfectly formatted to submit to oshpark
  6. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from oPossum in ESI Project: Water Usage Monitoring   
    Interesting project, I'm actually doing something similar with cc110l and msp430G2553. I call it "droplet". It runs off of a cr2450 battery, sleeps most of the time then wakes up sends measurements to a Hub that is wall powered and the hub ships the data to data.sparkfun.com. Here's the droplet:
     

     
    And here is a hub prototype (just ordered a real pcb for it)
     

     
    You can see the electric imp that receives data via uart the pushes it to sparkfun.
     
    My web app project imp.guru fetches the data from sparkfun to view, here's the data imp.guru/f1
     
     
    I'm willing to share any/all of this work for your project if interested. My recommendation would be to skip the whole energy harvesting thing and use batteries. With the right design you should last years on a pair of AA's.
     
    I've seen projects on hack a day where people use Hall effect sensors to pick up the spinning magnet in their utility water meter. I think this is it:
     
    http://hackaday.io/project/1460-Remote-Water-Consumption-Display
  7. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from abecedarian in Roaming rats   
    Weird it looks like their site is down.
     
    Here's a decent video 
     
    there is also their crowd funding site: http://www.dragoninnovation.com/projects/16-dash-the-diy-robot
     
    Jus the control board is also for sale on tindie: https://www.tindie.com/products/DashRobotics/dashboard/
  8. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from abecedarian in ESI Project: Water Usage Monitoring   
    Interesting project, I'm actually doing something similar with cc110l and msp430G2553. I call it "droplet". It runs off of a cr2450 battery, sleeps most of the time then wakes up sends measurements to a Hub that is wall powered and the hub ships the data to data.sparkfun.com. Here's the droplet:
     

     
    And here is a hub prototype (just ordered a real pcb for it)
     

     
    You can see the electric imp that receives data via uart the pushes it to sparkfun.
     
    My web app project imp.guru fetches the data from sparkfun to view, here's the data imp.guru/f1
     
     
    I'm willing to share any/all of this work for your project if interested. My recommendation would be to skip the whole energy harvesting thing and use batteries. With the right design you should last years on a pair of AA's.
     
    I've seen projects on hack a day where people use Hall effect sensors to pick up the spinning magnet in their utility water meter. I think this is it:
     
    http://hackaday.io/project/1460-Remote-Water-Consumption-Display
  9. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from Rickta59 in ESI Project: Water Usage Monitoring   
    Interesting project, I'm actually doing something similar with cc110l and msp430G2553. I call it "droplet". It runs off of a cr2450 battery, sleeps most of the time then wakes up sends measurements to a Hub that is wall powered and the hub ships the data to data.sparkfun.com. Here's the droplet:
     

     
    And here is a hub prototype (just ordered a real pcb for it)
     

     
    You can see the electric imp that receives data via uart the pushes it to sparkfun.
     
    My web app project imp.guru fetches the data from sparkfun to view, here's the data imp.guru/f1
     
     
    I'm willing to share any/all of this work for your project if interested. My recommendation would be to skip the whole energy harvesting thing and use batteries. With the right design you should last years on a pair of AA's.
     
    I've seen projects on hack a day where people use Hall effect sensors to pick up the spinning magnet in their utility water meter. I think this is it:
     
    http://hackaday.io/project/1460-Remote-Water-Consumption-Display
  10. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from alchy75 in Programming/debugging MSP430(G2553) while not common ground   
    I do this all of the time with a board that is independently powered by a battery. In theory, joining the ground is all that you need to do HOWEVER it depends on the power source for your MSP430 and what IT is referenced to. Short of a very complicated explanation, if you connect the 3 pins that @@roadrunner84 suggested and plug the Launchpad into a laptop running from battery (not plugged into the wall) I think that you will be ok. If any type of high voltage is involved be very careful, this could be dangerous.
  11. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from bluehash in My new project: imp.guru   
    Thought that I would share my latest project, it is a web application written in Ruby on Rails but also embedded related.  The site is http://imp.guru it is basically a tool that can be used to graph data from a phant.io server also known as data.sparkfun.com.  
     
    You can also browse other peoples data streams in the "Discover" section.  It also serves is a url shortener so that you can tweet a link (if you are into that) or just simple remember it so that you can type it into a friends phone or computer.
     
    Some of my favorite streams:
     
    http://imp.guru/f7
    http://imp.guru/fa
    http://imp.guru/f8
     
    Personally I have http://imp.guru/f1, if is a Si7005 Temp and Humidity Sensor attached to a MSP430G2553 that is soldered onto a Anaren Air Booster pack, then this transmits the measurements back to another MSP430 that forwards the data to an Electric Imp then the Imp uploads to data.sparkfun.com.  Sounds worse than it really is.  Here's some pics:
     
    Sensor:

     
    Hub/Electric Imp:

     
     
    Next step is making more sensors!
  12. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from cubeberg in My new project: imp.guru   
    Thought that I would share my latest project, it is a web application written in Ruby on Rails but also embedded related.  The site is http://imp.guru it is basically a tool that can be used to graph data from a phant.io server also known as data.sparkfun.com.  
     
    You can also browse other peoples data streams in the "Discover" section.  It also serves is a url shortener so that you can tweet a link (if you are into that) or just simple remember it so that you can type it into a friends phone or computer.
     
    Some of my favorite streams:
     
    http://imp.guru/f7
    http://imp.guru/fa
    http://imp.guru/f8
     
    Personally I have http://imp.guru/f1, if is a Si7005 Temp and Humidity Sensor attached to a MSP430G2553 that is soldered onto a Anaren Air Booster pack, then this transmits the measurements back to another MSP430 that forwards the data to an Electric Imp then the Imp uploads to data.sparkfun.com.  Sounds worse than it really is.  Here's some pics:
     
    Sensor:

     
    Hub/Electric Imp:

     
     
    Next step is making more sensors!
  13. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from GeekDoc in Job offers on 43oh   
    I think that it is great that people are using the forum to solicit job offers but I 200% agree that the hiring party should pay for agree that there should be a fee for the privilege to hire on the site. A recruiter gets 30% of the first year salary. I don't know how much LinkedIn, Indeed or Monster get but I'm sure that it is a few hundred.
  14. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from GeekDoc in Buying an oscilloscope, need some advice.   
    Mention eevblog to tequipment and they will give a discount. That's where I got my Rigol from.
  15. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from bluehash in InstaSpin questions   
    Hi Alec, seems to me that of your motor has hall sensors, use them! You will get much better reliability than a sensor less algorithm. They also help with speed. I have a pretty old project called BLDC booster for MSP430g2553 that you can check out of git hub: https://github.com/lgbeno/BLDC-Booster. Don't get me wrong instaspin is cool be no need making if more difficult on yourself...
  16. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from basil4j in InstaSpin questions   
    My primary goal was to generate the lowest possible BOM cost for the board so that is why I went with discrete transistors.  For a real product like you are suggesting, a proper driver chip is absolutely the right way to go.
     
    FAN7388 looks like an awesome part, it is also very inexpensive compared to other solutions from TI or Allegro.  I never did build to pro but thought that it would be much better from a efficiency point of view.  Using High side NMOS is also a big improvement which FAN7388 enables.
     
    I think you're on the right track for reliability, keep the solution as cool as possible.  It can be a little bit of a delicate balance when specing MOSFETs because RDSon and Gate Capacitance work opposite of one another.  So higher gate capacitance means inefficiencies in the driver vs Higher RDSon means losses in the switch.  It is however easier to get the heat out of a FET.
     
    About the PWM frequency, I think that I was using ~20kHz, it worked fine, at first we were doing 10kHz and there was some audible sound coming from the motor, I still found some noise but we thought that it was related to the commutation of the motor, that should be better if you actually have a load and also it's a farming truck so it probably is not a quiet environment...  Thinking about the timer clocks for MSP430 to know what PWM duty cycle resolution that you could get with a higher frequency.  16MHz=62.5ns 55kHz=18180ns so thats about 290 clock cycles meaning that you have about 8bits resolution and a step size of 0.34% not too bad...  Just remember that switching losses go up as frequency increases.
     
    The design is open source so use away!  It would be great if you fed some of the code back to the community, understand if you can't though.
  17. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from basil4j in InstaSpin questions   
    by the way, if you are using the G2553, make sure to use the 28 pin TSSOP or 32 pin QFN version as there are 3 outputs for the timers.  This way you can just use one timer for PWM and free the other for things like speed measurement.
  18. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from basil4j in InstaSpin questions   
    Hi Alec, seems to me that of your motor has hall sensors, use them! You will get much better reliability than a sensor less algorithm. They also help with speed. I have a pretty old project called BLDC booster for MSP430g2553 that you can check out of git hub: https://github.com/lgbeno/BLDC-Booster. Don't get me wrong instaspin is cool be no need making if more difficult on yourself...
  19. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from veryalive in Sensorless BLDC motor control   
    Cool project, I did something very similar as well!
     
    https://github.com/lgbeno/BLDC-Booster
     
    There is software on there too that you are free to reference. It works with some exceptions. The method that I used for commutation is bemf integration similar to the ti instaspin approach. The issues that I had was that for very fast motors(>500Kv), I wasn't sampling the ADC fast enough to get the commutation timing right but for slow motors, it works great.
     
    A few words of wisdom since I worked on this project for quite some time. I would recommend using the 28pin Tssop or qfn32 versions of g2553. Reason being is that it has 3 pins attached to ta1.1 which you can use for the high side pwm signals and 3 pins attached to ta1.2 to be used for low side pwm signals. This does 3 things, frees up timer 0 for something else, allows you to do dead time insertion (if your gate drivers don't already) and just makes your code easier too!
     
    The other thing is that you will see your pwm super imposed on your bemf which will likely cause false trips of the comparator. To solve this, there's a low pass filter but that also introduces a dc offset that throws off your zero cross point.
     
    Long story short, I came up with a different network that filters and then ac couples the bemf to the comparator. I was seeing pretty good results with that approach. Then I had to return my borrowed scope and have not been able to work on it. Good news is I'm getting a brand new Rigol DS2072 for keeps on Thursday.
     
    Anyway I guess that is my project life story, hope it helps. Tomorrow ill try to dig up schematics with those improvements (not in github yet).
     
    Btw the schematics are very inspired by the microkoptor.de schematics, mine are as well... I wonder how they got away with the pwm glitches in their software. Obviously theirs works quite well.
  20. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from bluehash in Sensorless BLDC motor control   
    Cool project, I did something very similar as well!
     
    https://github.com/lgbeno/BLDC-Booster
     
    There is software on there too that you are free to reference. It works with some exceptions. The method that I used for commutation is bemf integration similar to the ti instaspin approach. The issues that I had was that for very fast motors(>500Kv), I wasn't sampling the ADC fast enough to get the commutation timing right but for slow motors, it works great.
     
    A few words of wisdom since I worked on this project for quite some time. I would recommend using the 28pin Tssop or qfn32 versions of g2553. Reason being is that it has 3 pins attached to ta1.1 which you can use for the high side pwm signals and 3 pins attached to ta1.2 to be used for low side pwm signals. This does 3 things, frees up timer 0 for something else, allows you to do dead time insertion (if your gate drivers don't already) and just makes your code easier too!
     
    The other thing is that you will see your pwm super imposed on your bemf which will likely cause false trips of the comparator. To solve this, there's a low pass filter but that also introduces a dc offset that throws off your zero cross point.
     
    Long story short, I came up with a different network that filters and then ac couples the bemf to the comparator. I was seeing pretty good results with that approach. Then I had to return my borrowed scope and have not been able to work on it. Good news is I'm getting a brand new Rigol DS2072 for keeps on Thursday.
     
    Anyway I guess that is my project life story, hope it helps. Tomorrow ill try to dig up schematics with those improvements (not in github yet).
     
    Btw the schematics are very inspired by the microkoptor.de schematics, mine are as well... I wonder how they got away with the pwm glitches in their software. Obviously theirs works quite well.
  21. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from swampdonkeykami in stepper position feedback options?   
    In my mind a servo implies feedback.
     
    I think it's best to use some sensor to ensure a hydraulic valve position to guard against Mis steps and glitches like you mentioned. Even in a stepper based system. The control will need to be able to tolerate the resolution of the step size though otherwise it will oscillate if it is trying to reach a position between two steps.
     
    One other sensor type for linear position would be a lvdt transducer which is used in aerospace hydraulic actuators.
  22. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from Tribes in Sensorless BLDC motor control   
    Btw, I have quite a few of my bldc boosters sitting around, I could send you one to jump start your code dev, send me a pm if you want one.
  23. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from Tribes in Sensorless BLDC motor control   
    Sorry, bumped the send button. What I was trying to say was that with the single pin pwm input for the gate drivers, this tells me that they are complementary drivers, ie when the pin is high, high side get is on, when low, low side get is on. This is an issue for bldc because there are 6 different pwm states where you may be driving phase a high side and phase b low side, all other fets need to be off in this state. I don't think that is possible with these gate drivers.
     
    You need to get drivers that have seprate inputs for high side and low side drive, or use 6 single channel drivers. Finding a cost effective gate drive is a difficult thing, especially for these huge 6mohm fets!
  24. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from OhmMegaman in Sensorless BLDC motor control   
    Cool project, I did something very similar as well!
     
    https://github.com/lgbeno/BLDC-Booster
     
    There is software on there too that you are free to reference. It works with some exceptions. The method that I used for commutation is bemf integration similar to the ti instaspin approach. The issues that I had was that for very fast motors(>500Kv), I wasn't sampling the ADC fast enough to get the commutation timing right but for slow motors, it works great.
     
    A few words of wisdom since I worked on this project for quite some time. I would recommend using the 28pin Tssop or qfn32 versions of g2553. Reason being is that it has 3 pins attached to ta1.1 which you can use for the high side pwm signals and 3 pins attached to ta1.2 to be used for low side pwm signals. This does 3 things, frees up timer 0 for something else, allows you to do dead time insertion (if your gate drivers don't already) and just makes your code easier too!
     
    The other thing is that you will see your pwm super imposed on your bemf which will likely cause false trips of the comparator. To solve this, there's a low pass filter but that also introduces a dc offset that throws off your zero cross point.
     
    Long story short, I came up with a different network that filters and then ac couples the bemf to the comparator. I was seeing pretty good results with that approach. Then I had to return my borrowed scope and have not been able to work on it. Good news is I'm getting a brand new Rigol DS2072 for keeps on Thursday.
     
    Anyway I guess that is my project life story, hope it helps. Tomorrow ill try to dig up schematics with those improvements (not in github yet).
     
    Btw the schematics are very inspired by the microkoptor.de schematics, mine are as well... I wonder how they got away with the pwm glitches in their software. Obviously theirs works quite well.
  25. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from bluehash in Looking for FPGA suggestions   
    I have a Xilinx Spartan 3A embedded processing kit sitting around, I'll send it over to you for $50 if interested. It includes the Xilinx platform cable programmer too.
     
    http://www.xilinx.com/products/boards-and-kits/DO-SP3E1600E-DK-UNI-G.htm
     
    Otherwise the Terasic DE0 nano board is a great tool.
     
    Personally I prefer verilog, Vhdl is just too strongly typed for my taste.
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