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Lgbeno

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  1. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from bluehash in Solar Powered Light. Good for hacking/IoT - $10 Amazon   
    Kinda coincidental, my family and I are taking a vacation in Door Co WI where there are a few Harbor Towns on Lake Michigan. Taking a stroll down the docks and what do I see:

     
    Would make a good foot traffic counter!
     
     
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  2. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from vinicius.jlantunes in New MSP430 Wireless Sensor Node   
    I've wanted to create a batteries included, very low cost wireless sensor kit for quite a long time now.  I've made some attempts in the past but up until this point they were either too expensive to produce and too limited in expandability.  I think that I've finally struck the balance that I'm going to be pleased with.
     

     
    The device is a little larger than a single AA battery, that is what it is powered off of.  It has an NCP1400 Boost converter to bump up the voltage to 3.3V.  The processor is MSP430G2553IRHB (32QFN) and it is attached to a HopeRF RF75 radio.  There are 15 GPIO available through a 0.1in female header that is sandwiched between the battery holder and the circuit board.  It plugs into a Launchpad for programming.  Footprints are available to solder on a Si7020 temp sensor, a 32kHz crystal and two LEDs.
     
    I have the pins_energia ready and now looking at what it takes to make the @@spirilis enrf24 library work with it.  I'll also create my own library with some analog.io tie ins as well as a special surprise.
     
    My goal is to sell these for $9.99 after I can get them debugged.  Would anyone be interested in one?
  3. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from oPossum in New MSP430 Wireless Sensor Node   
    I've wanted to create a batteries included, very low cost wireless sensor kit for quite a long time now.  I've made some attempts in the past but up until this point they were either too expensive to produce and too limited in expandability.  I think that I've finally struck the balance that I'm going to be pleased with.
     

     
    The device is a little larger than a single AA battery, that is what it is powered off of.  It has an NCP1400 Boost converter to bump up the voltage to 3.3V.  The processor is MSP430G2553IRHB (32QFN) and it is attached to a HopeRF RF75 radio.  There are 15 GPIO available through a 0.1in female header that is sandwiched between the battery holder and the circuit board.  It plugs into a Launchpad for programming.  Footprints are available to solder on a Si7020 temp sensor, a 32kHz crystal and two LEDs.
     
    I have the pins_energia ready and now looking at what it takes to make the @@spirilis enrf24 library work with it.  I'll also create my own library with some analog.io tie ins as well as a special surprise.
     
    My goal is to sell these for $9.99 after I can get them debugged.  Would anyone be interested in one?
  4. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from roadrunner84 in New MSP430 Wireless Sensor Node   
    I've wanted to create a batteries included, very low cost wireless sensor kit for quite a long time now.  I've made some attempts in the past but up until this point they were either too expensive to produce and too limited in expandability.  I think that I've finally struck the balance that I'm going to be pleased with.
     

     
    The device is a little larger than a single AA battery, that is what it is powered off of.  It has an NCP1400 Boost converter to bump up the voltage to 3.3V.  The processor is MSP430G2553IRHB (32QFN) and it is attached to a HopeRF RF75 radio.  There are 15 GPIO available through a 0.1in female header that is sandwiched between the battery holder and the circuit board.  It plugs into a Launchpad for programming.  Footprints are available to solder on a Si7020 temp sensor, a 32kHz crystal and two LEDs.
     
    I have the pins_energia ready and now looking at what it takes to make the @@spirilis enrf24 library work with it.  I'll also create my own library with some analog.io tie ins as well as a special surprise.
     
    My goal is to sell these for $9.99 after I can get them debugged.  Would anyone be interested in one?
  5. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from Fmilburn in New MSP430 Wireless Sensor Node   
    I've wanted to create a batteries included, very low cost wireless sensor kit for quite a long time now.  I've made some attempts in the past but up until this point they were either too expensive to produce and too limited in expandability.  I think that I've finally struck the balance that I'm going to be pleased with.
     

     
    The device is a little larger than a single AA battery, that is what it is powered off of.  It has an NCP1400 Boost converter to bump up the voltage to 3.3V.  The processor is MSP430G2553IRHB (32QFN) and it is attached to a HopeRF RF75 radio.  There are 15 GPIO available through a 0.1in female header that is sandwiched between the battery holder and the circuit board.  It plugs into a Launchpad for programming.  Footprints are available to solder on a Si7020 temp sensor, a 32kHz crystal and two LEDs.
     
    I have the pins_energia ready and now looking at what it takes to make the @@spirilis enrf24 library work with it.  I'll also create my own library with some analog.io tie ins as well as a special surprise.
     
    My goal is to sell these for $9.99 after I can get them debugged.  Would anyone be interested in one?
  6. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from yyrkoon in New MSP430 Wireless Sensor Node   
    Yeah, the HopeRF website is a little dodgy, I clicked through those malware warnings for the heck of it.  As far as I know I'm still safe.  From what I can tell there are a lot of similarities to nRF24 except for cost, this one is cheaper which lets me hit that 9.99 price in low volume.  HopeRF has been easy to work with when purchasing parts, I must say that.  Again the decision about this radio was pretty much strictly made on price, once we have a solid library, it should be pretty transparent.
  7. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from yyrkoon in New MSP430 Wireless Sensor Node   
    I've wanted to create a batteries included, very low cost wireless sensor kit for quite a long time now.  I've made some attempts in the past but up until this point they were either too expensive to produce and too limited in expandability.  I think that I've finally struck the balance that I'm going to be pleased with.
     

     
    The device is a little larger than a single AA battery, that is what it is powered off of.  It has an NCP1400 Boost converter to bump up the voltage to 3.3V.  The processor is MSP430G2553IRHB (32QFN) and it is attached to a HopeRF RF75 radio.  There are 15 GPIO available through a 0.1in female header that is sandwiched between the battery holder and the circuit board.  It plugs into a Launchpad for programming.  Footprints are available to solder on a Si7020 temp sensor, a 32kHz crystal and two LEDs.
     
    I have the pins_energia ready and now looking at what it takes to make the @@spirilis enrf24 library work with it.  I'll also create my own library with some analog.io tie ins as well as a special surprise.
     
    My goal is to sell these for $9.99 after I can get them debugged.  Would anyone be interested in one?
  8. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from dubnet in New MSP430 Wireless Sensor Node   
    I've wanted to create a batteries included, very low cost wireless sensor kit for quite a long time now.  I've made some attempts in the past but up until this point they were either too expensive to produce and too limited in expandability.  I think that I've finally struck the balance that I'm going to be pleased with.
     

     
    The device is a little larger than a single AA battery, that is what it is powered off of.  It has an NCP1400 Boost converter to bump up the voltage to 3.3V.  The processor is MSP430G2553IRHB (32QFN) and it is attached to a HopeRF RF75 radio.  There are 15 GPIO available through a 0.1in female header that is sandwiched between the battery holder and the circuit board.  It plugs into a Launchpad for programming.  Footprints are available to solder on a Si7020 temp sensor, a 32kHz crystal and two LEDs.
     
    I have the pins_energia ready and now looking at what it takes to make the @@spirilis enrf24 library work with it.  I'll also create my own library with some analog.io tie ins as well as a special surprise.
     
    My goal is to sell these for $9.99 after I can get them debugged.  Would anyone be interested in one?
  9. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from abecedarian in New MSP430 Wireless Sensor Node   
    I've wanted to create a batteries included, very low cost wireless sensor kit for quite a long time now.  I've made some attempts in the past but up until this point they were either too expensive to produce and too limited in expandability.  I think that I've finally struck the balance that I'm going to be pleased with.
     

     
    The device is a little larger than a single AA battery, that is what it is powered off of.  It has an NCP1400 Boost converter to bump up the voltage to 3.3V.  The processor is MSP430G2553IRHB (32QFN) and it is attached to a HopeRF RF75 radio.  There are 15 GPIO available through a 0.1in female header that is sandwiched between the battery holder and the circuit board.  It plugs into a Launchpad for programming.  Footprints are available to solder on a Si7020 temp sensor, a 32kHz crystal and two LEDs.
     
    I have the pins_energia ready and now looking at what it takes to make the @@spirilis enrf24 library work with it.  I'll also create my own library with some analog.io tie ins as well as a special surprise.
     
    My goal is to sell these for $9.99 after I can get them debugged.  Would anyone be interested in one?
  10. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from cubeberg in New MSP430 Wireless Sensor Node   
    I've wanted to create a batteries included, very low cost wireless sensor kit for quite a long time now.  I've made some attempts in the past but up until this point they were either too expensive to produce and too limited in expandability.  I think that I've finally struck the balance that I'm going to be pleased with.
     

     
    The device is a little larger than a single AA battery, that is what it is powered off of.  It has an NCP1400 Boost converter to bump up the voltage to 3.3V.  The processor is MSP430G2553IRHB (32QFN) and it is attached to a HopeRF RF75 radio.  There are 15 GPIO available through a 0.1in female header that is sandwiched between the battery holder and the circuit board.  It plugs into a Launchpad for programming.  Footprints are available to solder on a Si7020 temp sensor, a 32kHz crystal and two LEDs.
     
    I have the pins_energia ready and now looking at what it takes to make the @@spirilis enrf24 library work with it.  I'll also create my own library with some analog.io tie ins as well as a special surprise.
     
    My goal is to sell these for $9.99 after I can get them debugged.  Would anyone be interested in one?
  11. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from Fmilburn in DIY Rain Gauge   
    Awesome guys! These are the exact types of projects that I'd like to help connect to analog.io. Let me know if you are interested!
     
     
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  12. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from greeeg in Who is using MSP430G2553?   
    My experience working with 5v: level shifting to 3.3...all the time
     
     
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  13. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from RobG in Alpha testing of analog.io MQTT web terminal   
    I've been having some fun recently with a pretty simple board.  I mentioned it last week on this thread.  It is really inspired by @@cubeberg who has done a lot more work with bridging nRF24 communications back to the cloud then I have.  He's using CC3200 but I wanted to try continue some work that I have been doing with ESP8266 and MQTT.  Both technologies are freakishly cool!
     
    The basic premise is that sensor nodes are powered by a single AAA battery, then I use a TPS61097A-33DBVT to boost the voltage to 3.3V.  From there I power up a MSP430G2553 running some code that I wrote in Energia.  The code basically reads a Si7020 temp/humidity sensor via I2C and dumps the readings to nRF24 using the @@spirilis library.  On the other side, there is another one of these nodes in RX mode waiting for the nRF24 packets to come in and forwards them on to ESP8266 via UART.
     
    What is new, is that I'm working on some ESP8266 code that takes incoming UART data and forwards it on to a MQTT broker running at analog.io.  Then I have new web features to connect to this virtual terminal right inside of a browser.  Embeds work too:
     

     
    So what you see is live data coming across this system.  If you type things into the terminal, it is transmitted live to the ESP8266 UART and subsequently the MSP430.  I have not coded up any actions to take from the received messages yet but it would be fun to hear suggestions if anyone has them!
     
    I haven't exposed this functionality to users yet but am curious if anyone wants to give it a try and help me work out the kinks (which I'm sure that there are many).  Ultimately I think that I would like to make a product that is a super simple to use WiFi UART that could be added to any project, then users can decide how they want to use it.
     
    Some pictures:
     

     

     

     

     
  14. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from greeeg in Alpha testing of analog.io MQTT web terminal   
    I've been having some fun recently with a pretty simple board.  I mentioned it last week on this thread.  It is really inspired by @@cubeberg who has done a lot more work with bridging nRF24 communications back to the cloud then I have.  He's using CC3200 but I wanted to try continue some work that I have been doing with ESP8266 and MQTT.  Both technologies are freakishly cool!
     
    The basic premise is that sensor nodes are powered by a single AAA battery, then I use a TPS61097A-33DBVT to boost the voltage to 3.3V.  From there I power up a MSP430G2553 running some code that I wrote in Energia.  The code basically reads a Si7020 temp/humidity sensor via I2C and dumps the readings to nRF24 using the @@spirilis library.  On the other side, there is another one of these nodes in RX mode waiting for the nRF24 packets to come in and forwards them on to ESP8266 via UART.
     
    What is new, is that I'm working on some ESP8266 code that takes incoming UART data and forwards it on to a MQTT broker running at analog.io.  Then I have new web features to connect to this virtual terminal right inside of a browser.  Embeds work too:
     

     
    So what you see is live data coming across this system.  If you type things into the terminal, it is transmitted live to the ESP8266 UART and subsequently the MSP430.  I have not coded up any actions to take from the received messages yet but it would be fun to hear suggestions if anyone has them!
     
    I haven't exposed this functionality to users yet but am curious if anyone wants to give it a try and help me work out the kinks (which I'm sure that there are many).  Ultimately I think that I would like to make a product that is a super simple to use WiFi UART that could be added to any project, then users can decide how they want to use it.
     
    Some pictures:
     

     

     

     

     
  15. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from vinicius.jlantunes in How to solder HTSSOP heatsink without reflowing the board?   
    Many different tricks to do this, the ones mentioned above are good.
    Additionally I recommend using solder paste. Its glorious combination of solder and flux ensures that you get good solder coverage. Handy in whatever solder scenario.
     
    You can do a toaster reflow too, dab on some paste then 2 min at 250 deg f, 3 min at 450 deg F. I use two different toaster ovens that I bought for $5 each at the thrift shop. Works surprisingly well.
     
     
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  16. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from Adnan in Implementing WSN   
    I'm pretty sure that there is little to no overlap between CC1120 and CC1101.
     
    CC430 has the same radio core as CC1101 afaik
     
     
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  17. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from Adnan in CC1120 booster pack   
    http://www.digirf.com/EN/ProView/80.html
     
     
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  18. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from Adnan in Implementing WSN   
    Check out http://forum.43oh.com/index.php?/topic/8274-Cheap-solar-battery-%2B-wireless-IoT-node
     
     
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  19. Like
    Lgbeno reacted to bluehash in CC3200 Wi-Fi Sensor Tag coming soon.   
    TI's sensorTag page shows the Wi-Fi version as "Coming Soon".
    Seems to be based on the CC3200 MCU. @@cubeberg and @@Lgbeno will be definitely pleased.
     

  20. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from bluehash in Alpha testing of analog.io MQTT web terminal   
    I've been having some fun recently with a pretty simple board.  I mentioned it last week on this thread.  It is really inspired by @@cubeberg who has done a lot more work with bridging nRF24 communications back to the cloud then I have.  He's using CC3200 but I wanted to try continue some work that I have been doing with ESP8266 and MQTT.  Both technologies are freakishly cool!
     
    The basic premise is that sensor nodes are powered by a single AAA battery, then I use a TPS61097A-33DBVT to boost the voltage to 3.3V.  From there I power up a MSP430G2553 running some code that I wrote in Energia.  The code basically reads a Si7020 temp/humidity sensor via I2C and dumps the readings to nRF24 using the @@spirilis library.  On the other side, there is another one of these nodes in RX mode waiting for the nRF24 packets to come in and forwards them on to ESP8266 via UART.
     
    What is new, is that I'm working on some ESP8266 code that takes incoming UART data and forwards it on to a MQTT broker running at analog.io.  Then I have new web features to connect to this virtual terminal right inside of a browser.  Embeds work too:
     

     
    So what you see is live data coming across this system.  If you type things into the terminal, it is transmitted live to the ESP8266 UART and subsequently the MSP430.  I have not coded up any actions to take from the received messages yet but it would be fun to hear suggestions if anyone has them!
     
    I haven't exposed this functionality to users yet but am curious if anyone wants to give it a try and help me work out the kinks (which I'm sure that there are many).  Ultimately I think that I would like to make a product that is a super simple to use WiFi UART that could be added to any project, then users can decide how they want to use it.
     
    Some pictures:
     

     

     

     

     
  21. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from reaper7 in Alpha testing of analog.io MQTT web terminal   
    I've been having some fun recently with a pretty simple board.  I mentioned it last week on this thread.  It is really inspired by @@cubeberg who has done a lot more work with bridging nRF24 communications back to the cloud then I have.  He's using CC3200 but I wanted to try continue some work that I have been doing with ESP8266 and MQTT.  Both technologies are freakishly cool!
     
    The basic premise is that sensor nodes are powered by a single AAA battery, then I use a TPS61097A-33DBVT to boost the voltage to 3.3V.  From there I power up a MSP430G2553 running some code that I wrote in Energia.  The code basically reads a Si7020 temp/humidity sensor via I2C and dumps the readings to nRF24 using the @@spirilis library.  On the other side, there is another one of these nodes in RX mode waiting for the nRF24 packets to come in and forwards them on to ESP8266 via UART.
     
    What is new, is that I'm working on some ESP8266 code that takes incoming UART data and forwards it on to a MQTT broker running at analog.io.  Then I have new web features to connect to this virtual terminal right inside of a browser.  Embeds work too:
     

     
    So what you see is live data coming across this system.  If you type things into the terminal, it is transmitted live to the ESP8266 UART and subsequently the MSP430.  I have not coded up any actions to take from the received messages yet but it would be fun to hear suggestions if anyone has them!
     
    I haven't exposed this functionality to users yet but am curious if anyone wants to give it a try and help me work out the kinks (which I'm sure that there are many).  Ultimately I think that I would like to make a product that is a super simple to use WiFi UART that could be added to any project, then users can decide how they want to use it.
     
    Some pictures:
     

     

     

     

     
  22. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from reaper7 in Cheap solar battery + wireless IoT node   
    Having some fun with nRF24 today. This library is so easy to use, thanks @@spirilis


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  23. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from spirilis in Cheap solar battery + wireless IoT node   
    Having some fun with nRF24 today. This library is so easy to use, thanks @@spirilis


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  24. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from cubeberg in Cheap solar battery + wireless IoT node   
    I found a great water proof enc at Menards today for about $6.85 (does not include the 11% rebate!). Way cheaper that what I could find on digikey & mouser!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  25. Like
    Lgbeno got a reaction from chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    PM me your address and I'll donate to you one of my ESP8266 Dev boards.  You've shared so much with the 43oh community, you deserve one!  I'll help you out if you have ESP8266 questions too.
     

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