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vicvelcro

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  1. Like
    vicvelcro got a reaction from t0mpr1c3 in [Group Buy-18][D] WS2812 SMD RGB LEDs with integrated driver chip   
    @@t0mpr1c3
     
    You can count me in. I would prefer to send a money order or ca$h. But can do Paypal if there's no way around it.
     
    I'm in:
    125x YES;
    25 extra NO;
    B's YES;
    pcb NO
  2. Like
    vicvelcro got a reaction from bluehash in LaunchPad Proto Plate- from Ponoko   
    I'm a bit late to this party but...
     
    Here's mine:
    Lasered by own stand-offs and cut some holes in the sled for those to fit in. Tossed a couple of graphics on it. My stand-offs fit the holes loosely enough to fall out when they are not holding a board. Snapping in a board puts enough tension on the 'ankles' to hold them in very snuggly by friction. Cyanoacrylate (super glue) or plastic cement will hold the stand-offs permanenty. Board can be pulled out if the stand-offs are not glued to the sled - or they can be snapped out by *carefully* pulling back on the 'peaks' of the stand-offs.
     
    I cut 4 extra stand-offs, just in case I fail to be *carefull*. My laser is 50 watt with a 20" x 12" max material size.
     
    Without glueing the stand-offs, mine is holding just fine while actually working with it.
     



  3. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to LariSan in LaunchPad Proto Plate- from Ponoko   
    I had a few of these "protoplates" made-- I fell in love with the one from AdaFruit for the BeagleBone and really wanted one for the LaunchPad and had some made. 
    (I have to thank Bart, if he's on here, for really making my first Ponoko trial-run so smooth). 
     
     
        So here is where you can order the sheet.
    It's 14 total plates on the Plastic- Acrylic- Clear- 3mm- P3 sized sheet, which comes out to be about 3.50 for each plate- total about 46.50 (Bart had free shipping since he's a regular user at Ponoko). 
     

      I'm sure there is a more efficient way to arrange these to get more on the same sheet (there was a lot of extra plastic that wasn't used). This was a trail run for me. 
     
    It comes in a large sheet, where you only need to pull off your plate
      I left the backing on the plate--     Added the breadboard:    
    these breadboards from Mouser (I get them in packs of 10 so it comes out to be about 4.95 a piece)
      The hardest part was to figure out how to connect the LaunchPad to the sheet.  Even though it's nice that the rubber feet were already included... it turned out to be inconvenient. 
    The BeagleBone and the Arduinos have screws that allow you to use standoffs.  In this case after trying: hot glue, epoxy, these scrapbooking "zots" (super strong adhesive tapes in dot shape) and double stick tape and found out that all of them don't adhere to the rubber well.  What's worked is Crazy Glue.      Put it on the LaunchPad, set it down and let it dry...    then I peeled off the backing.        I'll get to test these in a workshop soon, but so far I like them, but plan on changing a few things.  I have about three extra that I wouldn't mind sending to anyone who wanted to see it.    It's hard to know which direction is up... I have two sleds and one is right handed and the other is left handed... I guess if I just removed the logo all together I could have it be either right or left handed      This is what I think my next one will look like, but I'm completely open for any suggestions!     Hope that's helpful, I've included the files to make the edits in my dropbox (it's in illustrator and the forum doesn't like the format for some reason). https://www.dropbox.com/sh/6tho7jrplryvyhl/PJAJ22XqpQ
    Final- LaunchPad Proto-Sled v1.0- Bart.zip
  4. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to zeke in RTFM - Read The Fabulous Manual   
    This is a community of techies that are working on a diverse range of projects daily. We fight many different battles on our quest to succeed with hardware and software.
     
    Together, we share our hopes, dreams, expectations, frustrations, losses and wins so that we feel like a community. A healthy community shares with its members so that it lives together, grows together, learns together, fails together and succeeds together. That is a thriving community.
     
    I think the problem with the newbies is that there is so much information out there that it is easy for them to become overloaded. The result is confusion.
     
    Most people don't get what they want because they don't know what they want.  They are confused which causes inaction which causes stagnation which causes frustration, discouragement and sometimes depression. Their questions indicate that they are frustrated and that they are stuck mentally. They are asking for a reset on their thoughts "What do I really want?"
     
    So, in my opinion, instead of RTFM'ing them, it may be better to start asking them questions. Then they will begin to unravel their minds and expectations until their thoughts become less confusing and frustrating for them.
     
    I know that TI puts out a boatload of documentation. It's hard to find a specific detail in that boatload of details especially when you are new to it all and you don't know how to effectively search it yet.
     
    When educating someone, the pattern I try to follow is this: teach, rebuke, correct then training. All with a lot of patience.
    1. Teach the knowledge so that the student becomes aware of what (s)he doesn't know
    2. Rebuke them for their belligerent misunderstanding i.e.: identify the ignorance and fill it with knowledge
    3. Correct them for their misunderstanding i.e.: the simple misunderstandings "No, an AND gate doesn't act like that. *Remember* what I said earlier?"
    4. Train them. i.e.: Practice, Practice, Practice!!!!
     
    Patient unraveling of their confusion using questions, I think, is the correct response to your question. Rebuke is not.
     
    What do you think?
  5. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to grahamf72 in Sleep mode during a fixed duration ?   
    The standard Energia delay() function spends most of its time in LPM0.  If you want lower than that you need to set up a timer running off either the optional Crystal or the VLO clock. 
     
    As an example for long low power delays, you could do something like the following:
     
    #include <Energia.h> volatile unsigned long delaycounter; void StartTimer() { //To use the VLO, Use the following: BCSCTL1 &= ~DIVA_3; // ACLK without divider - nominally 12kHz BCSCTL3 = (LFXT1S_2); // Source ACLK from VLO TA1CCTL0 = CCIE; // CCR0 interupt activated TA1CCR0=11999; // 12000 ticks is nominally 1 second TA1CTL = TASSEL_1 | ID_0 | MC_1; // Clock for TIMER = ACLK, No division, up mode //Alternatively to use the Crystal for more accuracy use the Following /* P2SEL |= (BIT6 | BIT7); // Reset P2_6 & P2_7 BCSCTL1 &= ~DIVA_3; // ACLK without divider - 32768kHz BCSCTL3 = (LFXT1S_0 | XCAP_3);// Source ACLK from XTal TA1CCTL0 = CCIE; // CCR0 interupt activated TA1CCR0=4096-1; // we are dividing clock by 8, so 4096 ticks = 1 second TA1CTL = TASSEL_1 | ID_3 | MC_1; // Clock for TIMER = ACLK, By 8 division, up mode */ } void StopTimer() { TA1CTL|=TACLR; } //Set Up the Interrupt routine... __attribute__((interrupt(TIMER1_A0_VECTOR))) void timer_isr (void) { ++delaycounter; //increment our seconds counter __bic_status_register_on_exit(LPM3_bits); //exit at full power. } //And here is our delay function... //this will create delays of up to approx 136 years //with 1 second resolution. void longdelay(unsigned long delayseconds) { delaycounter=0; StartTimer(); //start our timer up while (delaycounter<delayseconds) //while we haven't reached our count... __bis_status_register(LPM3_bits+GIE); //switch back to LPM3. StopTimer(); //times up, stop our timers. }; void setup() { Serial.begin(9600); }; void loop() { Serial.println("10 seconds mostly in LPM0 with traditional delay..."); delay(10000); Serial.println("10 seconds in LPM3 with longdelay..."); longdelay(10); };  
    When I tested this, I was getting about 1300uA (1.3mA) during the traditional delay(). This dropped to about 25uA when it was in the longdelay function.
  6. Like
    vicvelcro got a reaction from roadrunner84 in [43oh_101] Low power   
    If you can squeeze this into the video:
     
    What is gained or lost by using the 32KHz crystal or a Real Time Clock? Are the lowest power modes only available if they are NOT present?
     
    I am under the impression that the internal oscillator applies to all of the power modes. I do not know if the crystal or an RTC have anything to do with how LPM works. It that can be covered, even vaguely, it would be helpful knowledge.
  7. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to roadrunner84 in [43oh_101] Low power   
    Hey people, this Friday (Dec 6th) this topic will be opened for two weeks. I think I'll put a (not so strict) submission stop on posts here then. Anyone who wants a certain topic covered should mention so before then, so I can start compiling a sketch-up for the 43oh 101 video on low power then.
    So far these topics have been named and shall be (directly or implied) be included in the video:
    Using Energia with low-power on the Launchpad G2. Using Energia's GCC back-end compiler with low-power; reclaiming the watchdog timer from Energia. Acronyms and terms used by TI for low-power modes. Hinting on approaching low-power as @@vicvelcro asked; "what can and cannot be done in which low-power modes?" Thinking in low-power; low-power design strategies. Maybe a quick glance on the ULP advisor. A summary on how to use low-power modes. You'll be using these things for the tutorial
    A Launchpad G2 rev.1.5, including USB cable The MSP430G2553 that came with the Launchpad The MSP430G2452 that came with the Launchpad Energia (vesion 0101E0010) You may use any measurement equipment you like
  8. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to SugarAddict in Why should I move to Stellaris?   
    Interlaced and Outside Top Inside Bottom.

  9. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to bluehash in Tiva-C Series Launchpad Course on EdX   
    TIUniversity let us know that EdX is now offering a course on the TivaC Launchpad - Embedded Systems - Shape The World. It is being offered by Dr. Jon Valvano, who is a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin.
    Details of the class can be found here. Course is set to start on the 22nd of January, 2014.
  10. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to roadrunner84 in [43oh_101] Low power   
    Guys, thank you for the tips and pointers. But I want to underline once again that this topic is meant to gather questions to build a video tutorial upon, not to start a discussion about low power!
    If you feel the need to discuss low power, reply in a topic about how to approach it or start a new topic. I don't want those interested in low power to be baffled by some (sorry to be rough) know-it-all that states you should start out with the basic knowledge or wisdom, because that's exactly what the result (but the starting point) of this topic should be.
  11. Like
    vicvelcro got a reaction from Cw1X in [43oh_101] Low power   
    One question I have been wondering about and would like to see presented:
     
    What can be (and what cannot be) done in each power mode, using general terms?
     
    I have reviewed TI's info about power modes, but they pretty much use acronyms. For those of us who do not ALREADY know the meaning and significance of these acronyms, their explanation of power modes is about as clear as Mississippi River mud. Trying to look-up and then assimilate the acronyms when I am already focused on trying to do something specific - well, it just hasn't worked out for me. Too much cross-reference chasing (usually a minimum of 3 PDF files, each in excess of 50 pages) has been the barrier to my comprehension of low power modes. I have not found any general material regarding low power modes that brings it all together in one place.
     
    If my question would be better understood by including a bit of context, I'll pose one example scenario:
     
    I have an LASER beam (not powered by the MCU) directed at a receiving sensor. If and when the beam is interrupted, I would like an actuator to be triggered. While the beam is intact, there isn't much for the MCU to do, and shouldn't need to be in a fully awake state. What would be the lowest power mode for the MCU to recognize an interruption to the LASER beam at the sensor? What would be the lowest power mode for the MCU to send a trigger signal to the actuator? If I wanted to log the event to non-volatile RAM, what is the lowest power mode that allows the MCU to perform the write? For this scenario, assume that the LASER is powered independent of the MCU and focused on a passive IR receiver which outputs a varying voltage into an analog pin on the MCU to sense the presence or absence of the beam - assume that the actuator is a 9g micro-servo powered independent of the MCU - assume that the non-volatile RAM is MCU onboard.
     
    Being able to determine what can be done in each power mode vs what can not be done - well, then I would be able to switch to the appropriate power mode required while using the least amount of battery.
  12. Like
    vicvelcro got a reaction from abecedarian in [43oh_101] Low power   
    One question I have been wondering about and would like to see presented:
     
    What can be (and what cannot be) done in each power mode, using general terms?
     
    I have reviewed TI's info about power modes, but they pretty much use acronyms. For those of us who do not ALREADY know the meaning and significance of these acronyms, their explanation of power modes is about as clear as Mississippi River mud. Trying to look-up and then assimilate the acronyms when I am already focused on trying to do something specific - well, it just hasn't worked out for me. Too much cross-reference chasing (usually a minimum of 3 PDF files, each in excess of 50 pages) has been the barrier to my comprehension of low power modes. I have not found any general material regarding low power modes that brings it all together in one place.
     
    If my question would be better understood by including a bit of context, I'll pose one example scenario:
     
    I have an LASER beam (not powered by the MCU) directed at a receiving sensor. If and when the beam is interrupted, I would like an actuator to be triggered. While the beam is intact, there isn't much for the MCU to do, and shouldn't need to be in a fully awake state. What would be the lowest power mode for the MCU to recognize an interruption to the LASER beam at the sensor? What would be the lowest power mode for the MCU to send a trigger signal to the actuator? If I wanted to log the event to non-volatile RAM, what is the lowest power mode that allows the MCU to perform the write? For this scenario, assume that the LASER is powered independent of the MCU and focused on a passive IR receiver which outputs a varying voltage into an analog pin on the MCU to sense the presence or absence of the beam - assume that the actuator is a 9g micro-servo powered independent of the MCU - assume that the non-volatile RAM is MCU onboard.
     
    Being able to determine what can be done in each power mode vs what can not be done - well, then I would be able to switch to the appropriate power mode required while using the least amount of battery.
  13. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to silentburner in MSP430F5510 powered by USB port without an extra LDO?   
    Solved the Problem. On long USB-Lines, MSP needs more Power to drive the Line (pulses of 25mA and higher). Just add more Capacitors (10uF) to VBUS AND especially to VUSB (10uF). The nessesary power will be sourced by the bigger caps then.
     
  14. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to thanhtran in MSP430F5510 powered by USB port without an extra LDO?   
    My 5510 test board next to a SD card

  15. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to RobG in Testing boards   
    Here's how I test my boards using poor man's pogo pins
     


  16. Like
    vicvelcro got a reaction from roadrunner84 in [43oh_101] Low power   
    One question I have been wondering about and would like to see presented:
     
    What can be (and what cannot be) done in each power mode, using general terms?
     
    I have reviewed TI's info about power modes, but they pretty much use acronyms. For those of us who do not ALREADY know the meaning and significance of these acronyms, their explanation of power modes is about as clear as Mississippi River mud. Trying to look-up and then assimilate the acronyms when I am already focused on trying to do something specific - well, it just hasn't worked out for me. Too much cross-reference chasing (usually a minimum of 3 PDF files, each in excess of 50 pages) has been the barrier to my comprehension of low power modes. I have not found any general material regarding low power modes that brings it all together in one place.
     
    If my question would be better understood by including a bit of context, I'll pose one example scenario:
     
    I have an LASER beam (not powered by the MCU) directed at a receiving sensor. If and when the beam is interrupted, I would like an actuator to be triggered. While the beam is intact, there isn't much for the MCU to do, and shouldn't need to be in a fully awake state. What would be the lowest power mode for the MCU to recognize an interruption to the LASER beam at the sensor? What would be the lowest power mode for the MCU to send a trigger signal to the actuator? If I wanted to log the event to non-volatile RAM, what is the lowest power mode that allows the MCU to perform the write? For this scenario, assume that the LASER is powered independent of the MCU and focused on a passive IR receiver which outputs a varying voltage into an analog pin on the MCU to sense the presence or absence of the beam - assume that the actuator is a 9g micro-servo powered independent of the MCU - assume that the non-volatile RAM is MCU onboard.
     
    Being able to determine what can be done in each power mode vs what can not be done - well, then I would be able to switch to the appropriate power mode required while using the least amount of battery.
  17. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to ILAMtitan in Vetinari's Clock   
    I figured you guys might be interested in some of my tinkering with the Launchpad.  Hopefully by putting a few of my projects up here it will also keep me accountable for finishing them.
     
    This is one a cobbled together a few months ago.  It's been up on the MCU projects page on E2E, so you might have already seen it: http://e2e.ti.com/group/microcontrollerprojects/m/msp430microcontrollerprojects/664670.aspx
     
     
    PROJECT OVERVIEW
    The Vetinari clock is from a book series known as Discworld, where Lord Verinari has a clock in his waiting room which has an irregular tick. The idea of the clock is to add a sense of unease and anxiety to anyone in the waiting room since their brain doesn't filter out the ticks like a normal clock. Here's a video to get a better idea of the result.  The tick is actually a lot louder in person.
     


     
    SOFTWARE DESIGN
    To accomplish this task on a 430, we create an array of possible time frames to tick the clock, and parse through it at 4Hz. The array is 32 entries long, so it equates to 32 seconds in the real world. By randomly setting 32 of the elements high, we create a timing sequence. A high element will generate a tick of the clock. This means a second on the clock can be as little as 250ms, or as long as 24 seconds, and still keep accurate time.  Check the attached software too see how it's all done; I did my best to comment it up.  main.c
     
    HARDWARE DESIGN
    The clock coil is driven via an alternating polarity pulse.  The easiest way to change a load's polarity with an MCU is using an h-bridge.
     

     
    The schematic shown is a simple implementation using two NPN and two PNP transistors.  I had the transistors and drive resistors laying around, so this part was easy to cobble together (along with the half used battery holder).  It would be easy to use a single IO pin per side of the bridge, but the transistors fit better onto the launchpad, as shown in the image.  To add the driving resistors in series, I cut a small gap in the traces, scrapped off the solder mask on either side to make pads, and put down a small SMA resistor.  It's not pretty, but it works.
     

     
    In the clock mechanism, there is a small control board with a crystal and epoxy glob IC that normally runs the clock.  I just ripped that out and directly attached the coil to the h-bridge.
     

     
    The resulting clock is actually more maddening than I expected in a quiet environment.  By using 3V rather than the 1.5V that the original movement used, the ticks are much more pronounced and do an excellent job of ruining a person's calm.
  18. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to roadrunner84 in [43oh_101] Low power   
    In this topic we've been brainstorming about doing video tutorials for the 43oh community. One topic brought up was low power programming. In this post I'd like to invite you all to submit questions for the video tutorial about low power.
     
    Some pointers:
    Try to formulate your question in a general way, so it can be part of a tutorial. Try to avoid submitting a question that has been submitted already (you might like a post to underline its importance). Avoid answering questions to specific problems, instead ask the question in a separate topic; this topic is specifically to gather questions for the video tutorial. I'll be focusing on the Launchpad G2 (so the MSP430G2553 controller), so no high end processors or Tivas.
    I'll be using Energia all over, but I'll use it mainly as a simple GCC IDE, which it is perfectly capable of. This saves newbies the trouble of installing CCS, IAR or Eclipse+GCC.
     
    I hope I set the angle right this way to start helping folks get a better grasp of low power. Fire away
  19. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to abecedarian in This ought to be interesting.   
    I mentioned but in no way meant a specific schedule be adhered to. Having something bi-weekly, monthly or similar might be a draw to the community. My decision to give out 595 SR's is solely due to the fact I have many here and that seems like a good topic.
     
    We could call it 43oh 101. ;-)
     
    We could select a topic, give everyone a week or two to submit questions, give the 'instructor' a period to prepare the lecture. then the instructor presents the lecture??
  20. Like
    vicvelcro got a reaction from abecedarian in This ought to be interesting.   
    ***Moderator(s)***
    ***If any of the following is off-topic or inappropriate, please feel free to remove any offending text but please do not remove the portions that are acceptable.***
     
    ---
     
    I'd be willing to donate a couple of New In Box 430G2 v1.5 launchpads (including the 2452 and 2553 chips) to anyone in the United States that is willing to present a tutorial but is short on available MCUs. The 'presenter' would be welcome to keep the launchpad or pass it on to somebody else.
     
    I offer these because there are some very savvy people out there that might lack the hardware but posess the wetware. I lack the wetware but have some surplus hardware.
     
    I would be happy to learn anything from a well presented tutorial. Particularly for me: I2C (and SPI), Shift Registers, and writing to EPROM and FLASH have been insurmountable - due to not being able to see any demontrated examples presented in a manner I can relate to.
     
    I am completely lost with Code Composer Studio, so a bit of that would help me (and probably quite a few others).
     
    Sometimes, I am confused by some of what I find in the data sheets (when I began working with MCUs, data sheets were very aggravating). Possibly somebody who can give a presentation on how to actually USE the contents of a data sheet (in general) might receive the gratitude of a few n00bz.
     
    If a pool were available for me (and maybe others) to donate a $$$ tip of a small amount, I would drop a few bucks in the 'Tip Jar' from time to time.
  21. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to spirilis in New Chronos Kit   
    PS, if anyone needs some male 50mil headers and are in the USA, let me know and I can send some out in a letter. I got a ridiculous amount for like $11 from a chinese seller @ aliexpress.
  22. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to Rubi in CC430 Kits Need TLC - Free to Caring Members   
    Just recogniced I don't qualify because of missing attention points.
    So Automate was correct.
     
    chibiace---------------------------------------------New Zealand
    Cubeberg-------------------------------------------USA
    JWoodrell-------------------------------------------Missouri, USA
    Automate -------------------------------------------USA
  23. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to chicken in How the heck I should start using CSS?   
    Agreed, the workshops are more about getting started with MSP430 than getting started with coding and using a full-featured integrated development environment (IDE).
     
    Having the C++ development background (mostly Microsoft Visual Studio) but knowing nothing about MSP430/Stellaris and very little about embedded development, I found these workshops very helpful.
     
    Someone that's new to both should probably first try to take the training wheels of with Energia. E.g.
    - realize that there's no such language as Arduino or Energia, so get that C/C++ book/tutorial and venture beyond setup() and loop().
    - get up close to the hardware by accessing ports (easy) and peripherals (harder, particularly without debugger) without relying on Energia/Arduino libraries
    - write your own libraries for MSP430 peripherals or some external chips/hardware
    - when you're able to port some of the more AVR-optimized Arduino libraries to Energia, or manage to fix some of the still remaining bugs in core Energia libraries, you might be ready for the next step
     
    After that try to migrate to GCC or CCS. Personally, I prefer the latter as I can't live without auto-complete and a fully integrated debugger and am not too fond of messing with make-files. But then I'm a lazy old Windows guy
  24. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to f4dtr in Energia Cheat Sheet   
    Hi,
     
    I created a cheat-sheet for Launchpad, based on  http://www.cheat-sheets.org/#Arduino'>
  25. Like
    vicvelcro reacted to Fred in TRADE - See list of components   
    If you're after a PIR sensor I can recommend the Olimex ones. They have an onboard MSP430F2013 so are perfect for tweaking / extending the functionality.
    https://www.olimex.com/Products/MSP430/Starter/MSP430-PIR/
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