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zlalanne

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  1. Like
    zlalanne reacted to jpnorair in NuttX Port -- looking for cooperators   
    NuttX is one of the better MCU RTOS's I've encountered.  It is designed and written by a team of experts, it comes from the private-sector (so they have to keep focused on things that matter), and the support is good.  And it's open source.
    www.nuttx.org
     
    I'd like to port to MSP432.  I would also like to integrate a low-power BIOS into it, because at present the scheduling architecture isn't well-suited to using the ultra-low-power sleep modes on ARM.  This second task, I've already done in large part for OpenTag on STM32L, but integration is never plug-and-play with this stuff.
     
    Ping me if interested!  I'll set-up a GitHub repo momentarily.  You should have an MSP432 Launchpad, as that will be the target board.  If you've worked on NuttX, even better.
  2. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from Fmilburn in Use Energia in command line   
    There is also another tool called PlatformIO which allows you to create Energia projects, compile and flash from the command line.
     
    http://platformio.org/
  3. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from roadrunner84 in Deploying MSP430 Firmware using Ansible   
    Hello all!
     
    If anyone else is interested in devops tools like ansible/vagrant/docker or linux administration this project might interest you.
     
    I recently started learning about ansible a tool used to configure/orchestrate servers. So I thought I would try and use that to push firmware updates out to MSP430s. I came up with a solution that allows me to run a command on my machine which then copies the firmware to Rapsberry Pis and then flashes any MSP430 LaunchPads connected to them.
     
    I first had to compile the msp430 dll and the latest version of mspdebug for the ARM architecture (rather than x86). Essentially this allows me to program MSP430s from a Raspberry Pi using mspdebug. I talk about the steps here:
    http://zacklalanne.me/automated-deployment-of-msp430-firmware-part1/
     
    Then I wrote an ansible playbook to automatically deploy the dll and mspdebug as well as the firmware to the connected Raspberry Pis which then push the firmware to the MSP430s.
    http://zacklalanne.me/automated-deployment-of-msp430-firmware-part2/
     
    Don't think this is too realistic for an actual production environment but getting it all to run was a good learning exercise in compiling code on linux and system administration.
     
  4. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from bluehash in Educational BoosterPack MKII   
    There is also some examples in the latest MSPWare (2.30.00.49) showcasing the BooserPack + MSP432 Launchpad. Along with schematics and documentation for the board.
     
    http://www.ti.com/tool/mspware
  5. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from bluehash in Deploying MSP430 Firmware using Ansible   
    Hello all!
     
    If anyone else is interested in devops tools like ansible/vagrant/docker or linux administration this project might interest you.
     
    I recently started learning about ansible a tool used to configure/orchestrate servers. So I thought I would try and use that to push firmware updates out to MSP430s. I came up with a solution that allows me to run a command on my machine which then copies the firmware to Rapsberry Pis and then flashes any MSP430 LaunchPads connected to them.
     
    I first had to compile the msp430 dll and the latest version of mspdebug for the ARM architecture (rather than x86). Essentially this allows me to program MSP430s from a Raspberry Pi using mspdebug. I talk about the steps here:
    http://zacklalanne.me/automated-deployment-of-msp430-firmware-part1/
     
    Then I wrote an ansible playbook to automatically deploy the dll and mspdebug as well as the firmware to the connected Raspberry Pis which then push the firmware to the MSP430s.
    http://zacklalanne.me/automated-deployment-of-msp430-firmware-part2/
     
    Don't think this is too realistic for an actual production environment but getting it all to run was a good learning exercise in compiling code on linux and system administration.
     
  6. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from dubnet in Deploying MSP430 Firmware using Ansible   
    Hello all!
     
    If anyone else is interested in devops tools like ansible/vagrant/docker or linux administration this project might interest you.
     
    I recently started learning about ansible a tool used to configure/orchestrate servers. So I thought I would try and use that to push firmware updates out to MSP430s. I came up with a solution that allows me to run a command on my machine which then copies the firmware to Rapsberry Pis and then flashes any MSP430 LaunchPads connected to them.
     
    I first had to compile the msp430 dll and the latest version of mspdebug for the ARM architecture (rather than x86). Essentially this allows me to program MSP430s from a Raspberry Pi using mspdebug. I talk about the steps here:
    http://zacklalanne.me/automated-deployment-of-msp430-firmware-part1/
     
    Then I wrote an ansible playbook to automatically deploy the dll and mspdebug as well as the firmware to the connected Raspberry Pis which then push the firmware to the MSP430s.
    http://zacklalanne.me/automated-deployment-of-msp430-firmware-part2/
     
    Don't think this is too realistic for an actual production environment but getting it all to run was a good learning exercise in compiling code on linux and system administration.
     
  7. Like
    zlalanne reacted to jpnorair in A new MSP430 coming [MSP432 ARM]   
    The [extremely sophisticated] benchmarks I have will port easily to MSP432 and STM32L4.  Atmel will be later in the year, but I have low hopes for Atmel, and I might not bother.
     
    Warning: Rant ahead.
     
    Anyway, Atmel uses more BS in their datasheet and marketing than TI does, and TI uses *slightly* more than ST.  
    Atmel's marketing numbers are unrealistic, best case figures where all the peripherals are off, the integral DC-DC is running, the chip is running at 12 MHz only, and it is running specially crafted code from a small region of SRAM.  Practically, it does 100uA/MHz.  Look at the datasheet, it's all there, albeit somewhat hidden.  Moreover, it's CM0+, so you really should multiply all figures by 66% to compare to CM4: 100 --> 166. TI's numbers are more honest.  A benchmark library is running from FLASH, the clock is 48 MHz, peripherals are mostly on, but the DC-DC is running with input 3.0V.  TI provides a great amount of information about what the power figures are when running with LDO, and they are still quite good (~160uA/MHz). ST is running Dhrystone benchmarks with all the peripherals going, clock at 80 MHz, code from flash, 128 KB of SRAM active, and there is no DC-DC on the device, so it's just LDO.  112 uA/MHz.  I have to guess they have implemented a mixed-size process with the core at 65nm, because they are a "quantum" ahead of the TI and Atmel offerings. I do wireless IoT, at "low" frequencies (sub 1-GHz), and with low power.  I tend to shun DC-DC converters because they kick up a lot of noise that does affect my radios (I've measured, it can be seriously bad).  It takes a lot of design time to cut-down the noise of DC-DC converters, and it's not always possible (if you can control the switching frequency in software, it's a whole lot better though).  Moreover, the input voltage limit of MSP432 and SAML21 is 3.7 and 3.6V respectively, so IT'S USELESS. It needs to be 4.3V at least, so we can use Li-Ion.  Otherwise, I need to make my own step-down from the Li-Ion, and I'm inclined to use my own DC-DC, with a totally vetted analog design and low EMI, that feeds 1.8V to my system.
     
    I really don't need the M4F, but the truth is that I really do prefer the M3/M4 to the M0+.  M0 is a "red-haired step child."  It doesn't fit into a good standard (it's ARMv6+ vs the gold-standard ARMv7).  Compilers are worse.  It only has 8 registers that can be batched to the stack, whereas all the regs in M3/M4 can be (so threading sucks on M0).  It has a crippled NVIC, and on and on.  Basically, it's a low cost hack.  For low power, you actually do better with M3/M4.  For performance, M3/M4 also.
     
    M4F gives the MSP432 (and STM32L4) a really good entry point into sophisticated signal processing apps.  Hell yeah, we're going to do FFT on these things.  I think it is ridiculously cool to do FFT -- fast -- with 4-8 mA.  Not everyone here realizes the kinds of possibilities this opens-up.  You might not think you need FFT, but the best Reed-Solomon algorithm uses FFT, and RS is awesome for error correction and data integrity in lossy IoT networks.  So it's a completely legit thing to talk about.
     
    I want to reiterate that I only hate Atmel because they make me hate them by being disingenuous.  If they changed their ways, I would have no issue.  I have "no dog in this fight."
     
    Anyway, I can tell you now that any performance difference between MSP432P4 and STM32L4 will almost certainly be outweighed by the difference in the development packages, features, and peripherals.  But I still think it is worth the time to explore all the little things that don't get marketed, which actually do have a huge impact on low-power RTOS functionality.  These will be in the official review, coming sometime in May or June I would guess.
  8. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from tripwire in A new MSP430 coming [MSP432 ARM]   
    Official TI Press Release:
     
    http://newscenter.ti.com/2015-03-24-Texas-Instruments-introduces-32-bit-MSP432-microcontrollers-MCUs-Ultra-low-power-at-its-best-performance-at-its-core
     
    I think you guys probably know everything by now though 
  9. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from bluehash in A new MSP430 coming [MSP432 ARM]   
    Official TI Press Release:
     
    http://newscenter.ti.com/2015-03-24-Texas-Instruments-introduces-32-bit-MSP432-microcontrollers-MCUs-Ultra-low-power-at-its-best-performance-at-its-core
     
    I think you guys probably know everything by now though 
  10. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from abecedarian in A new MSP430 coming [MSP432 ARM]   
    Official TI Press Release:
     
    http://newscenter.ti.com/2015-03-24-Texas-Instruments-introduces-32-bit-MSP432-microcontrollers-MCUs-Ultra-low-power-at-its-best-performance-at-its-core
     
    I think you guys probably know everything by now though 
  11. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from szhao in Remotely Control Your LaunchPad with Firmata and Bluetooth   
    Since websocket is just TCP based at its core it should be supported by CC3000. I would start looking at porting an arduino library to energia, which would probably be easier than writing it from scratch. I haven't used atom-shell yet just node-webkit but it looks promising.
     
    https://github.com/brandenhall/Arduino-Websocket
  12. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from GeekDoc in Remote Control RedBot   
    Using my RedBot BoosterPack I have created a small remote control robot. The motors + chassis costs $15 from SparkFun so it's a pretty low cost solution to get started in robotics.
     
    On the controller side I use the CC1101L for wireless communication and the Educational BoosterPack MKII for the joystick. The F5529 LaunchPad simply reads the joystick value and decides which way the robot should move and transmits the data using the CC1101L. Here is a picture of the controller, note the CC1101L is on the bottom of the LaunchPad to make the joystick easy to use.

     
    On the robot side the F5529 LaunchPad is connected to the CC1101L BoosterPack to receive the data from the joystick. It then uses the RedBot BoosterPack to control the robot. 

     
    The GitHub repository is located here, which includes hardware + software. The remote control code isn't uploaded yet but will be once I clean it up.
      And now a video of it in action (phone quality).

     
     
  13. Like
    zlalanne reacted to szhao in Remotely Control Your LaunchPad with Firmata and Bluetooth   
    Programming a microcontroller for the first time can be a daunting task. What if you can remotely control your microcontroller by simply clicking few buttons on a PC GUI? 
     

     
    With Energia support, I was able to port existing Firmata code used for Arduino onto LaunchPads. Firmata is a serial communication protocol that allows a host (PC) sending commands to the microcontrollers (MSP430). You can use it to toggle pins and LEDs, or read digital and analog inputs without writing any C code. This makes it super easy to test out your new sensor or debug your circuit. Bluetooth simply creates a virtual serial port that emulates a physical serial port wire, so you can control and monitor your board remotely.
     
    Here is a demo video: 


     
    The application GUI is written in NodeJS. The browser is connected to the Node server using web socket. Whenever the user clicks a button, a message is sent to the server and the server will send Firmata commands to the LaunchPad.
     
    You can easily expand on top of the demo GUI I created by writing some javascript. Let's say you want to turn on an LED when the temperature is too high. You can let your Node server constantly check the temperature reading. Once it reaches the threshold, then set the LED pin to HIGH. 
     
    You can find out the source code of my project at my GitHub page: https://github.com/shengzhao91/FirmataGUI
  14. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from tripwire in Serial Data GUI   
    I created a quick project to start learning nodejs. To those that are unfamiliar nodejs allows you to write javascript for the server side. So I decided to write a small gui that plots serial data. The GUI itself is written in javscript/html and uses node-webkit to package it into a .exe file (or the correct package for your os).
     
    This could easily be extended to visualize a lot more I/O from the launchpad, and given that the GUI is written in html/javascript it is really easy to create new elements.
     

     
    Here is the source:
    https://github.com/zlalanne/node-serial-gui
     
    The repository includes the nodejs code as well as a simple Energia sketch to send a random value over serial.
  15. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from RobG in Ringbuffer - how do I identify "crititcal" sections   
    Just as another datapoint if you want to look at some code, Dr. Valvano from UT Austin (who ran the online Stellaris course) has all his code online and has a FIFO implementation worth looking at. Just search for "FIFO" on that page and you will see the files.
     
    http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/arm/
     
    It should be easily adaptable to MSP430.
  16. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from GeekDoc in Badge V2.0 discussion   
    I like the interaction idea! Maybe when you meet someone with the same color it plays a tune? Then resets to a new random color?
  17. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from spirilis in Badge V2.0 discussion   
    I like the interaction idea! Maybe when you meet someone with the same color it plays a tune? Then resets to a new random color?
  18. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from bluehash in Remote Control RedBot   
    Using my RedBot BoosterPack I have created a small remote control robot. The motors + chassis costs $15 from SparkFun so it's a pretty low cost solution to get started in robotics.
     
    On the controller side I use the CC1101L for wireless communication and the Educational BoosterPack MKII for the joystick. The F5529 LaunchPad simply reads the joystick value and decides which way the robot should move and transmits the data using the CC1101L. Here is a picture of the controller, note the CC1101L is on the bottom of the LaunchPad to make the joystick easy to use.

     
    On the robot side the F5529 LaunchPad is connected to the CC1101L BoosterPack to receive the data from the joystick. It then uses the RedBot BoosterPack to control the robot. 

     
    The GitHub repository is located here, which includes hardware + software. The remote control code isn't uploaded yet but will be once I clean it up.
      And now a video of it in action (phone quality).

     
     
  19. Like
    zlalanne reacted to emdarcher in Light Seeker robot with MSP430   
    Recently finished my first msp430 based robot, a Basic Light seeker!
     
    This was a project to get me to learn more about the MSP430 microcontroller. In this project specifically, using multiple ADC inputs and PWMs ( 2 PWMs was a little tricky on the MSP430G2452 but eventually got it ).
     
    The robot turns according to the difference between the light values on the left and right, using two Photoresistors/LDRs.
     
    The robot is powered my a set of 4 to 5 NiMH 1.2-1.4V batteries which directly power the l293d Motor Driver IC and DC motors, and is also fed into a LP2950-33 3.3V LDO to provide regulated power to the MSP430G2452 IC and Photoresistors/LDRs. Most of my robot designs use a separate power supply for control and motors for stability, but this one has been fine so far and has an abundance of filtering caps.
     
    For a better description look at my blog post here:
    http://emdinventor-blog.tk/light-seeker-robot-with-msp430/
     
    and for the code look at my github repository for the robot's code here:
    https://github.com/emdarcher/msp430_tank_robot
     
    Some pictures of the robot:

     

     

     
    Fritzing diagram ( missing 0.1uF filtering cap across Vcc and GND on the mcu ):
     

     
     
  20. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from dubnet in Remote Control RedBot   
    Using my RedBot BoosterPack I have created a small remote control robot. The motors + chassis costs $15 from SparkFun so it's a pretty low cost solution to get started in robotics.
     
    On the controller side I use the CC1101L for wireless communication and the Educational BoosterPack MKII for the joystick. The F5529 LaunchPad simply reads the joystick value and decides which way the robot should move and transmits the data using the CC1101L. Here is a picture of the controller, note the CC1101L is on the bottom of the LaunchPad to make the joystick easy to use.

     
    On the robot side the F5529 LaunchPad is connected to the CC1101L BoosterPack to receive the data from the joystick. It then uses the RedBot BoosterPack to control the robot. 

     
    The GitHub repository is located here, which includes hardware + software. The remote control code isn't uploaded yet but will be once I clean it up.
      And now a video of it in action (phone quality).

     
     
  21. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from GeekDoc in RedBot BoosterPack   
    I have finished my first revision of the RedBot BoosterPack. For those that don't know SparkFun has a robotics kit they call the "RedBot". Which is basically an Arduino, robot chassis and a bunch of sensors. This BoosterPack basically replaces the Arduino and allows you to plug in your favorite 40-pin LaunchPad to interact with the hardware. Check out my GitHub link below for more information on the differences. 
     
    SparkFun sells the robot chassis and motors for $15 on its website, using it with this BoosterPack and a LaunchPad is a low cost way to get into robotics. I have started to port the Arduino library to Energia and currently have support for the motors. The GitHub project below has a lot more info and the current project status.
     
    GitHub:
    https://github.com/zlalanne/redbot-boosterpack
     
    The BoosterPack by itself:

     
    The BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis. The chassis from SparkFun includes all screws + standoffs to mount correctly

     
    Sideview of the BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis

  22. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from JonnyBoats in RedBot BoosterPack   
    I have finished my first revision of the RedBot BoosterPack. For those that don't know SparkFun has a robotics kit they call the "RedBot". Which is basically an Arduino, robot chassis and a bunch of sensors. This BoosterPack basically replaces the Arduino and allows you to plug in your favorite 40-pin LaunchPad to interact with the hardware. Check out my GitHub link below for more information on the differences. 
     
    SparkFun sells the robot chassis and motors for $15 on its website, using it with this BoosterPack and a LaunchPad is a low cost way to get into robotics. I have started to port the Arduino library to Energia and currently have support for the motors. The GitHub project below has a lot more info and the current project status.
     
    GitHub:
    https://github.com/zlalanne/redbot-boosterpack
     
    The BoosterPack by itself:

     
    The BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis. The chassis from SparkFun includes all screws + standoffs to mount correctly

     
    Sideview of the BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis

  23. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from Automate in RedBot BoosterPack   
    I have finished my first revision of the RedBot BoosterPack. For those that don't know SparkFun has a robotics kit they call the "RedBot". Which is basically an Arduino, robot chassis and a bunch of sensors. This BoosterPack basically replaces the Arduino and allows you to plug in your favorite 40-pin LaunchPad to interact with the hardware. Check out my GitHub link below for more information on the differences. 
     
    SparkFun sells the robot chassis and motors for $15 on its website, using it with this BoosterPack and a LaunchPad is a low cost way to get into robotics. I have started to port the Arduino library to Energia and currently have support for the motors. The GitHub project below has a lot more info and the current project status.
     
    GitHub:
    https://github.com/zlalanne/redbot-boosterpack
     
    The BoosterPack by itself:

     
    The BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis. The chassis from SparkFun includes all screws + standoffs to mount correctly

     
    Sideview of the BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis

  24. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from Rei Vilo in RedBot BoosterPack   
    I have finished my first revision of the RedBot BoosterPack. For those that don't know SparkFun has a robotics kit they call the "RedBot". Which is basically an Arduino, robot chassis and a bunch of sensors. This BoosterPack basically replaces the Arduino and allows you to plug in your favorite 40-pin LaunchPad to interact with the hardware. Check out my GitHub link below for more information on the differences. 
     
    SparkFun sells the robot chassis and motors for $15 on its website, using it with this BoosterPack and a LaunchPad is a low cost way to get into robotics. I have started to port the Arduino library to Energia and currently have support for the motors. The GitHub project below has a lot more info and the current project status.
     
    GitHub:
    https://github.com/zlalanne/redbot-boosterpack
     
    The BoosterPack by itself:

     
    The BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis. The chassis from SparkFun includes all screws + standoffs to mount correctly

     
    Sideview of the BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis

  25. Like
    zlalanne got a reaction from jsolarski in RedBot BoosterPack   
    I have finished my first revision of the RedBot BoosterPack. For those that don't know SparkFun has a robotics kit they call the "RedBot". Which is basically an Arduino, robot chassis and a bunch of sensors. This BoosterPack basically replaces the Arduino and allows you to plug in your favorite 40-pin LaunchPad to interact with the hardware. Check out my GitHub link below for more information on the differences. 
     
    SparkFun sells the robot chassis and motors for $15 on its website, using it with this BoosterPack and a LaunchPad is a low cost way to get into robotics. I have started to port the Arduino library to Energia and currently have support for the motors. The GitHub project below has a lot more info and the current project status.
     
    GitHub:
    https://github.com/zlalanne/redbot-boosterpack
     
    The BoosterPack by itself:

     
    The BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis. The chassis from SparkFun includes all screws + standoffs to mount correctly

     
    Sideview of the BoosterPack + F5529 LaunchPad mounted to the robot chassis

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