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bluehash

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  1. Like
    bluehash reacted to zeke in Implementing an I2C slave device.   
    I have done both of these tasks for more than one client.
    The 1-Wire protocol speed ends up being about 15kHz, which is slow but reliable. It's really cool to see on an scope though.
    I developed the I2C slave code using the sample TI code as the starting point.
    Here are the research materials that I referred to while writing my I2C code:
    http://www.nxp.com/documents/application_note/AN10216.pdf http://www.nxp.com/documents/user_manual/UM10204.pdf http://i2c.info/i2c-bus-specification http://www.ti.com/lit/an/slva704/slva704.pdf My slave code just follows the logic of the transaction.
  2. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from tripwire in 20170311 - Upgrade   
    Hello Everyone,
    Thanks for being patient while the forums were being fixed and upgraded. One Friday morning(March 10th, 2017), the server went down. There was a memory issue, which stalled the SQL server and everything came to halt. 
    it had been fixed by Friday night,  but then went down again due to a mistake I made during the bringup. In the mean time, I also decided to try to upgrade the server(php and peripheral updates) as well as the forum software. I'm going to see how things plan out in the next couple of days.
    Any issues you see with the site, please reply to this thread.
    Thanks!
  3. Like
    bluehash reacted to Clavier in Implementing an I2C slave device.   
    Clavier's Short Guide to I²C Slaves on the MSP430x2xx Family
    Read section 17.3.4.1 of the User's Guide, and the example code.
    Slave mode is somewhat easier than master mode because you do not have to care about getting the transaction sequence correct; you just react to the master's requests.
    The slave address is an arbitrary but unique 7-bit number. Just put it into the I2COA ("own address") register; the USCI module will automatically handle transactions to this address.
    You do not need to configure a clock source; the clock signal is supplied by the master.
    When the master has written a byte, you get an RXIFG interrupt. Your interrupt handler must read that byte from RXBUF. (You can set the TXNACK bit after reading RXBUF, this will tell the master to stop after the following byte.)
    When the master wants to read a byte, you get a TXIFG interrupt. Your interrupt handler must write a byte to TXBUF.
    If your code is slow, the USCI module will automatically stop the bus via clock stretching until you have reacted.
    You can get notifications when start and stop conditions happen (STTIFG and STPIFG), but that is not always necessary.
    The I²C protocol itself defines only byte reads and writes. If you have registers, you have to handle the register address yourself. Typically, the first write after a start condition is the register address, and all following writes (and all reads) are from/to the specified register (and often the register address automatically increments).
    As a slave, you have no control over what the master does; you must react to any write and read requests at any time. (If you really have nothing to read, just send the last byte again, or some garbage byte.)
  4. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from yyrkoon in Other SBC's I've been considering.   
    The closest I've come to on SBCs are RasPis and BBB. They suffice most of my needs. With real time requirements on specific processes, the choice is towards any of the ARM Cortexs running bare metal or RTOS code.
     
  5. Like
    bluehash reacted to Rei Vilo in Other SBC's I've been considering.   
    Compared to the Raspberry Pi, The BeagleBone offers two PRUs for time-critical and deterministic tasks. However, developing against those PRUs isn't exactly easy. 
    I went for alternatives.
    Very similar to the Arduino Yun, the Mediatek LinkIt Smart 7688 Duo features two cores: the processor MT7688AN runs on Linux for WiFi, and the  ATmega32U4 micro-controller is compatible with Arduino. The Arduino Tian is an updated Arduino Yun with an Atheros AR9342 as CPU for WiFi (dual band WiFi), Ethernet (1000 Mbit/s Ethernet) and Bluetooth, and a Cortex-M0+ SAMD21G18 as MCU with 256 KB of Flash and 32 KB of RAM. The Intel Edison was very promising with a combined MPU + MCU + WiFi + BLE on a single SoC. Unfortunately, programming the MCU requires the reboot of the whole board MCU, and the MCU tick time is 10 ms. The SDK and API aren't mature yet but haven't been updated for a while. Dead project? Last and best choice, the UDOO Neo board combines a Cortex-A9 MPU with a Cortex-M4 MCU on the Freescale i.MX 6SoloX. The Cortex-M4 can be programmed on the fly. The board features Ethernet + WiFi + BLE.
  6. Like
    bluehash reacted to yyrkoon in Other SBC's I've been considering.   
    So in interest of full disclosure. I *will* be purchasing the two board I'm about to mention. Soon.
     
    The ODROID XU4: http://ameridroid.com/products/odroid-xu4
    The ODROID C2  : http://ameridroid.com/products/odroid-c2
     
    I've done a lot of reading over the last several months. In hopes of finding an embedded Linux SBC(ARM) that can be used as a desktop, as well as a work station for ARM board development. To come straight to the point. For that purpose, and in the same price range. Nothing comes close to the ODROID XU4. The things that "sinched" the deal for me was the quad A15's( quad A7's too ! ), the inclusion of USB 3.0, and true GbE networking( not shared with the USB buses ). A friend of mine has one and has demonstrated it for me a couple times. This thing is a beast ! Passed all that, one can run Android on this hardware, and I've been considering tinkering around with Android development as well,
     
    The ODROID C2 is very much like the Raspberry PI 3, but at a higher price point, and added performance / features. I think I paid $35 for my rPI including a power supply, and free shipping. That's a really good price for the hardware. The C2 on the other hand, like stated above has very similar hardware with a few key differences. First, for all intents and purposes they use the same processor type. An A53 quad core. However the C2 is clocked at 2Ghz. Secondly, the C2 has true GbE networking. Potentially very useful for many applications. Lastly, the C2 has twice the memory - 2G versus 1G.
     
    We actually have a project involved using a C2 in a professional capacity. No, this project is nothing like a NAS, SAN, or anything of that nature . . .Although it would perform that type of job very well I think. I am very anxious to get my hands on one. Very anxious to get my hands on an XU4 as well, but the XU4 will be more of a toy for a while. As well as handling any kernel, or debian package compiling I need done in the future.
     
    What boards are all you interested in ?
  7. Like
    bluehash reacted to yyrkoon in BeagleBone Blue robotics controller board   
    Yeah, pretty cool little board. I was offered a chance to get a "beta" board in exchange for developing open source software for this specific board. Unfortunately, I was hired full time just a week prior by a person whom was contracting some work out to me . . . So I was, and am still busy doing work for my "day job".
    I think one of the neatest things about this board, is the Octavo SoM. Which is pretty much an AM335x processor, with internal memory( no need to worry about getting DDR traces exactly right ), and from what I was told around 6 months ago from one of the team members of the SoM is that many of the processors "pins"( balls ) can be brought out and used. Where the beaglebone does have many I/O / peripheral options, but from memory, less than half of the pins are used( if memory serves correctly ).
     
     
  8. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from yyrkoon in BeagleBone Blue robotics controller board   
    There is a new BeagleBone out in the field. This one is the "Blue", following the "Black" and "Green" ones.
    Expected retail price is $80. 
    Feature list:
    Processor: Octavo Systems OSD3358 1GHz ARM® Cortex-A8
    • 512MB DDR3 RAM
    • 4GB 8-bit on-board flash storage
    • 2×32-bit 200-MHz programmable real-time units (PRUs)
    • On-board flash programmed with Linux distribution
    Connectivity and sensors
    • Battery: 2-cell LiPo support with balancing, 6-16V charger input
    • Wireless: 802.11bgn, Bluetooth 4.1 and BLE
    • Motor control: 8 6V servo out, 4 DC motor out, 4 quad enc in
    • Sensors: 9 axis IMU, barometer
    • Connectivity: HighSpeed USB 2.0 client and host
    • Other easy connect interfaces: GPS, DSM2 radio, UARTs, SPI, I2C, analog, buttons, LEDs
    Software Compatibility
    • Debian, ROS, Ardupilot,
    • Graphical programming, Cloud9 IDE on Node.js


     
     
  9. Like
    bluehash reacted to Fmilburn in Texas Instruments Pi Day Celebration   
    Texas Instruments has standard shipping for $3.14 and 10% off selected tools through March 19th: http://www.ti.com/lsds/ti/store/march-ti-store-pi-week-promotion.page?HQS=ecm-tistore-promo-piweek17-bti-lp-null-wwe

  10. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from Fmilburn in Energia sensor code and library examples   
    Pinning topic. Thanks for keeping the repo updated. @Fmilburn
  11. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from tripwire in FourThreeOh wins TI Community Highlight of the Year Award for 2016   
    Thanks @Rei Vilo.
    To all, the award goes to you too. Thanks for being wonderful members.
  12. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from Barcooler in MSP430 analog clock   
    Came across this while browsing.
    MSP430 Analog Gauge Clock

     
     
  13. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from NurseBob in FourThreeOh wins TI Community Highlight of the Year Award for 2016   
    Thanks @Rei Vilo.
    To all, the award goes to you too. Thanks for being wonderful members.
  14. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from Frida in FourThreeOh wins TI Community Highlight of the Year Award for 2016   
    Thanks @Rei Vilo.
    To all, the award goes to you too. Thanks for being wonderful members.
  15. Like
    bluehash reacted to energia in VBUS detect OR USB disconnection detection   
    There is no connection from VBUS to any of the pins on the chip. What I would recommend is to tap ICDI_VBUS through a resistor divider to end up with 3.3V and then connect that to one of the pins. You might also be able to just directly connect ICDI_VBUS to the switching regulator control pin either through a resistor divider or directly if it is 5 Volt tolerant.
  16. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from chicken in FourThreeOh wins TI Community Highlight of the Year Award for 2016   
    Thanks @Rei Vilo.
    To all, the award goes to you too. Thanks for being wonderful members.
  17. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from timotet in FourThreeOh wins TI Community Highlight of the Year Award for 2016   
    Thanks @Rei Vilo.
    To all, the award goes to you too. Thanks for being wonderful members.
  18. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from jBrizzle in FourThreeOh wins TI Community Highlight of the Year Award for 2016   
    Thanks @Rei Vilo.
    To all, the award goes to you too. Thanks for being wonderful members.
  19. Like
    bluehash reacted to Rei Vilo in FourThreeOh wins TI Community Highlight of the Year Award for 2016   
    Well deserved, congratulations Gerard!

  20. Like
    bluehash reacted to Rei Vilo in Energia - TivaC - Kenetc Display (SPI)   
    Best way is to open the related header file and search for getTouch().
    Which example are you trying to compile?
    Does the main sketch include
    #include <LCD_screen.h> #include <LCD_screen_font.h> #include <LCD_utilities.h> #include <Terminal12e.h> #include <Terminal6e.h> #include <Terminal8e.h> This is an unpleasant requirement from Arduino / Energia: all the libraries need to be listed on the main sketch.
  21. Like
    bluehash reacted to rads in Energia - TivaC - Kenetc Display (SPI)   
    Solved. I have included all the libraries. The problem was in calling the getTouch function. I declared x,y,z as variables of type unsigned short and called the getTouch with x,y,z as parameters. The compilation was successful and the getTouch returns true on touching the screen and fills in the x,y,z values.
  22. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from LiviuM in BeagleBone Blue robotics controller board   
    There is a new BeagleBone out in the field. This one is the "Blue", following the "Black" and "Green" ones.
    Expected retail price is $80. 
    Feature list:
    Processor: Octavo Systems OSD3358 1GHz ARM® Cortex-A8
    • 512MB DDR3 RAM
    • 4GB 8-bit on-board flash storage
    • 2×32-bit 200-MHz programmable real-time units (PRUs)
    • On-board flash programmed with Linux distribution
    Connectivity and sensors
    • Battery: 2-cell LiPo support with balancing, 6-16V charger input
    • Wireless: 802.11bgn, Bluetooth 4.1 and BLE
    • Motor control: 8 6V servo out, 4 DC motor out, 4 quad enc in
    • Sensors: 9 axis IMU, barometer
    • Connectivity: HighSpeed USB 2.0 client and host
    • Other easy connect interfaces: GPS, DSM2 radio, UARTs, SPI, I2C, analog, buttons, LEDs
    Software Compatibility
    • Debian, ROS, Ardupilot,
    • Graphical programming, Cloud9 IDE on Node.js


     
     
  23. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from dubnet in BeagleBone Blue robotics controller board   
    There is a new BeagleBone out in the field. This one is the "Blue", following the "Black" and "Green" ones.
    Expected retail price is $80. 
    Feature list:
    Processor: Octavo Systems OSD3358 1GHz ARM® Cortex-A8
    • 512MB DDR3 RAM
    • 4GB 8-bit on-board flash storage
    • 2×32-bit 200-MHz programmable real-time units (PRUs)
    • On-board flash programmed with Linux distribution
    Connectivity and sensors
    • Battery: 2-cell LiPo support with balancing, 6-16V charger input
    • Wireless: 802.11bgn, Bluetooth 4.1 and BLE
    • Motor control: 8 6V servo out, 4 DC motor out, 4 quad enc in
    • Sensors: 9 axis IMU, barometer
    • Connectivity: HighSpeed USB 2.0 client and host
    • Other easy connect interfaces: GPS, DSM2 radio, UARTs, SPI, I2C, analog, buttons, LEDs
    Software Compatibility
    • Debian, ROS, Ardupilot,
    • Graphical programming, Cloud9 IDE on Node.js


     
     
  24. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from greeeg in MSP430 analog clock   
    Came across this while browsing.
    MSP430 Analog Gauge Clock

     
     
  25. Like
    bluehash reacted to Rei Vilo in I2C Wire Library Problem   
    Actually, the I²C implementation for the ESP8266 differs from the Arduino standard. Energia complies with the Arduino standard.
    I'm using I²C extensively on LaunchPads and I've never experienced any issues.
    The MSP430F5538 is not officially supported by Energia. Have you tried with a LaunchPad officially supported by Energia, e.g. MSP430G2553 or MSP430F5529? I don't have any MPL3115A2 at hand, so I can't proceed with tests. Does its data-sheet mention some non-standard usage of I²C protocol? Finally, have you tried to add a delay and change your code to Wire.beginTransmission(MPL3115A2_ADDRESS); Wire.write(regAddr); Wire.endTransmission(); // modified delay(100); // added Wire.requestFrom(MPL3115A2_ADDRESS, 1); return Wire.read();
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