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bluehash

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  1. Like
    bluehash reacted to cde in SMD Size Reference   
    Numbers are misleading. What you may think is big (or small) enough in your head, might not be the right size. Visuals help.
     
    Edit: Update Below.
     

     
    Clockwise from top:
    DIP 8pin IC (100 mil Lead spacing)
    Sot-23 3pin Transistor (50 mil Lead Spacing, due to 3 pin configuration, pin 1 and 3 are 100 mils apart)
    0805 Capacitor
    Soic(Wide) 28pin IC (50 mil Lead Spacing)
    2pin 100x100 mil Header
    1206 Capacitor
     
    On a 2010 Penny for the size reference. The 1206 and Sot23 cover the date exactly. The 0805 isn't big enough to do that.
     
    The 0805's solder pads fit on the Soic's 50 mil spaced leads exactly. If you don't want to dedicate a pad to a decoupling 0805, just solder it straight onto the pins (if you ever find an IC with V+ and Gnd right next to each other that is).
     
    Same goes for the 1206 and the DIP's 100 mil spaced leads.
     
    You can even use a 2pin header to make a smd to through-hole adapter if you don't have the needed through-hole version. Both the 1206 and the 0805 (barely) can be done. Even the Sot-23, if you use 3 inline header pins and a bit of wire.
     
    Sot-23 has the same spacing as a Soic package ic. With the 3-pin parts, the middle pin of one side is removed, while the outer two pins on the other side are removed as well, so it has a 100 mil spacing on the side with 2 pins. The 4-pin version has 3 pins on one side, with an extra big pin on the other side (heat dissipation purposes normally). The 5-pin version has all 3 pins on one side and the 2 outer pins on the other side. The 6-pin version has a full set of pins on both sides. Even though sot-23 and soic have the same pin spacing and sizes, Soic chips, having a bigger body, are easier to handle. Even sop/ssop/tssop parts, with 25 mil spaced pins, are easier to handle than sot-23 6 pin imho.
     
    Lesson is really, stick to through hole for prototyping till you are ready to beta. Sot23 is hella tiny, and I would have not gone with it for the transistors I bought if I had known (The standard to-92 versions were the same price, and have higher watt ratings to boot). Ha.
     
    ---
     
    It happened again. I was expecting a decent sized QFP chip. I got:

     
    A 3mm x 3mm package QFN with pin spacing smaller than tssop, in a reflow only package. Oh vey.
  2. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from NJC in Connecting Piezo Vibration Sensor to LaunchPad   
    I see you posted on theTI-Launchpad groups too.
     
    Peter provided a link to NJC's article. That is very well commented. You should be able to set up your ADC with the code provided.
     
    If you don't understand a particular line, let us know.
  3. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from mnpumar in You can Thank users now!   
    Hi All,
    43oh has a new feature, where you can "Thank" users if their posts have been helpful to you. You will see a tiny "Thumbs Up" sign on the top right of every post, except yours..as you can't thank yourself :mrgreen: .
     
    This also adds two fields to your profile. Hope you guys like it and make use of it.. Thank away!
  4. Like
    bluehash reacted to GeekDoc in 10-pin Stacking Header Source   
    This is NOT an endorsement, since I have not dealt with this company at all, but I just saw that http://www.launchpadshields.com/ has 10-pin stackable headers for pretty cheap.
     
    The site is terrible, and they're opening with just this one product, but shipping is free in the US and the price is pretty good. They evidently plan to sell custom shields for the LaunchPad. The first shield they have planned is just a custom-sized protoboard. They should have licensed JoesBytes' design; at least add some functionality. (Joe: Maybe contact them and work a deal?)
     
    I hope they make it; I'd like to see some cool shields. I'm not sure the "LaunchPadShields.com" or "LaunchPad Electronics" names will survive trademark scrutiny. All in all, a weak start at a business, so they may not last long.
     
    TLDR: 10-pin headers we've all been looking for at reasonable prices. May not last long.
     
    -Doc
  5. Like
    bluehash reacted to GeekDoc in Joby Taffey made Hack-A-Day!   
    One of our members was featured on Hack-A-Day! They featured his work on the USB dongle from the Girl Tech IM-ME device. Have a look: HERE
     
    Nice work Joby!
  6. Like
    bluehash reacted to cde in Prototyping IC layout hint   
    Just a general hint about abstracting chip layout. Currently working on a hd44780 setup with i2c, using a TI PCF8574A. Placed the chip on the breadboard, and wired it all up, and realized how dumb I was. The PCF8574, and most i2c or spi or shift port expanders look like they place all gpio on one half of the chip, and the control pins on the other half. It's easier to wire (no overlapping wires), and neater since it uses less wire, to face the chip with the port pins towards the LCD. This also minimizes bridging over from one side of the breadboard to the other, and leaves more of the breadboard open for plugging things in.
     

    pcf8574a DIP <- Control Side || Device Side -> Vcc SDA SCL INT GP7 GP6 GP5 GP4 =============================== A0 A1 A2 GP0 GP1 GP2 GP3 Gnd <- Control Side || Device Side ->
     
    The Soic version is nicer. All control pins (Except ground) are on the the left side, and all Port pins are on the right side (Except GP0).
     
    In general, try to look at the chip in sets of pins, instead of individually, for ease in layout.
  7. Like
    bluehash reacted to gatesphere in DIY $3 contact microphone/piezo pickup   
    Hello all,
     
    I hacked together a piezo pickup for acoustic instruments (initially to test the sensitivity of the piezo elements I'm going to use in another project, but this experiment turned out rather well). This thing is awesome. My roommate and I had fun with this thing for hours last night, taping it to everything... even our throats. It picks up voices!
     
    Anyways, the whole thing can be built for around $3 from RadioShack, assuming you already have a soldering iron, solder, and electrical tape. But who doesn't?
     
    I did a write up with pictures and demo recording on my blog. Check it out here: http://blog.suspended-chord.info/?c=25
     

  8. Like
    bluehash reacted to gatesphere in LaunchPad + BeagleBoard Sentry Droid security cam   
    Not my project, but I thought you all would find this interesting.
     
    http://myjanky.com/beagleboard/?p=197
     
    EDIT: corrected link.
  9. Like
    bluehash reacted to GeekDoc in Halloween Projects with the Launchpad?   
    I had an idea that I might use for Halloween:
     
    Hide a device in the bushes near a walkway that uses a PIR sensor (still trying to find thos RS ones...). When triggered, run a cell phone vibrating motor attached to the bush to shake it slightly (at this point, assume someone looks that way). After a second or two, slowly (~2-3 sec) brighten two red LED "eyes" to look spooky. Then (optional), do a second or two of bright white LEDs in a strobe to really make them jump back. Bonus: Add some screechy sound with the strobe.
     
    Parts:

    MSP430
    PIR sensor (or sub some other sensor)
    2 red LED (5-10mm)
    vibrating motor
    transistor to switch motor
    batteries (I'm planning a 9v with V-reg)
    resistors for LEDs
    3 bright white LED (optional)
    speaker (optional)
     
    I think most of us have most of these parts handy, right? I'm going to try to make one or two of these before Halloween. :twisted:
  10. Like
    bluehash reacted to cde in Parallax PIR sensor and LaunchPad - help?   
    Just a heads up. If you want a similar PIR sensor for cheaper, and it comes with a bonus case with 2AA holder and plenty of space ;P
     
    Radioshack sku 630-0282
    Clearance item/Close Out price. The bigger Radioshacks have them, but have them search the sku in the district tool if not (the online one, not the POS one). Talking Pumpkin Insert. 97 cents.
     


     
    Same BISS0001 PIR controller, comparable PIR sensor (I opened one and checked).
     
    All smd caps/resistors, so it lies flat if you want to take it out of the case.
     
    Picked up three. At 1.03 each, I couldn't resist. Two will be left alone, and one will add a msp430 + rtc as a data logger. Every time it is trigger, +1 to a byte section of the inforam. (Unless I can get a eeprom). After halloween, I'll download the data, and have a log of every time it triggered due to the rtc.
  11. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from GeekDoc in HD44780-based LCD - cursor problem   
    Remove all the externs as gatesphere suggested.
    Also LCD_data() is not declared nor defined. Those functions need to be resolved first.
  12. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from NJC in You can Thank users now!   
    Hi All,
    43oh has a new feature, where you can "Thank" users if their posts have been helpful to you. You will see a tiny "Thumbs Up" sign on the top right of every post, except yours..as you can't thank yourself :mrgreen: .
     
    This also adds two fields to your profile. Hope you guys like it and make use of it.. Thank away!
  13. Like
    bluehash got a reaction from GeekDoc in HD44780-based LCD - cursor problem   
    In LCD-functions.c,
    "defines" is misspelled.
    Fix:Rename "LCD-defines.h" to "LCD-definies.h"
    You will also eventually need "LCD-functions.h" which was not included in the zip file.
  14. Like
    bluehash reacted to jsolarski in 32k crystal install and test   
    This is how to install the 32K stock crystal that comes with the MSP430 Launchpad kit
    Original post http://justinstech.org/2010/07/msp430-launchpad-dev-kit-how-too/
     
    * Supplies
    * Launch pad
    * 32KHz crystal
    * soldering iron
    * solder
    * headers
    * Bright lamp
    * electrical tape or tape like substitute
    * odds and ends (lol)(tweezers or other tool for manipulation)
     
     
    Steps
    1) open crystal packagaging and place crystal on launchpad
     
    2) more the crystal around with tweezers or other manipulation tool till the leads of the crystal line up with the solder pad
    (you may need to use a magnifying glass)
    3) tape crystal in place, and adjust so the leads are touching the pads.

    4) solder the leads to the pads*** be careful not to bridge the pads, or hold the iron on there too long.
     
    5) once you have verified that the leads are soldered, you will have to Ground the casing, there is a small pad opposite of the leads you will want to solder the casing to the pad. after that let it cool for a moment, and double check your work.
     
    6) Test- Use the WDT+ to dbl check that your crystal is functioning correctly
    IAR or CCS example code taken directly from msp430 example code

    //****************************************************************************** // MSP430F20xx Demo - LFXT1 Oscillator Fault Detection // // Description: System runs normally in LPM3 with WDT timer clocked by // 32kHz ACLK with a 1x4 second interrupt. P1.0 is normally pulsed every // second inside WDT interrupt. If an LFXT1 oscillator fault occurs, // NMI is requested forcing exit from LPM3. P1.0 is toggled rapidly by software // as long as LFXT1 oscillator fault is present. Assumed only LFXT1 as NMI // source - code does not check for other NMI sources. // ACLK = LFXT1 = 32768, MCLK = SMCLK = Default DCO // // //*External watch crystal on XIN XOUT is required for ACLK*// // // // MSP430F20xx // --------------- // /|\| XIN|- // | | | 32kHz // --|RST XOUT|- // | | // | P1.0|-->LED // // M. Buccini / L. Westlund // Texas Instruments Inc. // September 2005 // Built with CCE Version: 3.2.0 and IAR Embedded Workbench Version: 3.40A //****************************************************************************** #include volatile unsigned int i; void main(void) { WDTCTL = WDT_ADLY_1000; // WDT 1s interval timer IE1 |= WDTIE; // Enable WDT interrupt P1DIR = 0xFF; // All P1.x outputs P1OUT = 0; // All P1.x reset P2DIR = 0xFF; // All P2.x outputs P2OUT = 0; // All P2.x reset // An immedate Osc Fault will occur next IE1 |= OFIE; // Enable Osc Fault while(1) { P1OUT ^= 0x01; // Toggle P1.0 using exclusive-OR _BIS_SR(LPM3_bits + GIE); // Enter LPM3 w/interrupt } } #pragma vector=WDT_VECTOR __interrupt void watchdog_timer (void) { _BIC_SR_IRQ(LPM3_bits); // Clear LPM3 bits from 0(SR) } #pragma vector=NMI_VECTOR __interrupt void nmi_ (void) { do { IFG1 &= ~OFIFG; // Clear OSCFault flag for (i = 0xFFF; i > 0; i--); // Time for flag to set P1OUT ^= 0x01; // Toggle P1.0 using exclusive-OR } while (IFG1 & OFIFG); // OSCFault flag still set? IE1 |= OFIE; // Enable Osc Fault }
     
    MSPGCC version for linux or mac users ***compiles, but is untested on MSP430***will test soon

    //****************************************************************************** // MSP430F20xx Demo - LFXT1 Oscillator Fault Detection // // Description: System runs normally in LPM3 with WDT timer clocked by // 32kHz ACLK with a 1x4 second interrupt. P1.0 is normally pulsed every // second inside WDT interrupt. If an LFXT1 oscillator fault occurs, // NMI is requested forcing exit from LPM3. P1.0 is toggled rapidly by software // as long as LFXT1 oscillator fault is present. Assumed only LFXT1 as NMI // source - code does not check for other NMI sources. // ACLK = LFXT1 = 32768, MCLK = SMCLK = Default DCO // // //*External watch crystal on XIN XOUT is required for ACLK*// // // // MSP430F20xx // --------------- // /|\| XIN|- // | | | 32kHz // --|RST XOUT|- // | | // | P1.0|-->LED // // M. Buccini / L. Westlund // Texas Instruments Inc. // September 2005 // Built with CCE Version: 3.2.0 and IAR Embedded Workbench Version: 3.40A // modified by justin solarski to work with MSPGCC 4.0 //****************************************************************************** #include // IAR & CC use #include #include //for interrupt handler volatile unsigned int i; void main(void) { WDTCTL = WDT_ADLY_1000; // WDT 1s interval timer IE1 |= WDTIE; // Enable WDT interrupt P1DIR = 0xFF; // All P1.x outputs P1OUT = 0; // All P1.x reset P2DIR = 0xFF; // All P2.x outputs P2OUT = 0; // All P2.x reset // An immedate Osc Fault will occur next IE1 |= OFIE; // Enable Osc Fault _enable_interrupt(); // enable interrupts added for mspgcc while(1) { P1OUT ^= 0x01; // Toggle P1.0 using exclusive-OR _BIS_SR(LPM3_bits + GIE); // Enter LPM3 w/interrupt } } //#pragma vector=WDT_VECTOR removed for mspgcc interrupt(WDT_VECTOR) watchdog_timer (void) //__interrupt void watchdog_timer (void) removed for mspgcc { _BIC_SR_IRQ(LPM3_bits); // Clear LPM3 bits from 0(SR) } //#pragma vector=NMI_VECTOR removed for mspgcc interrupt(NMI_VECTOR) nmi_ (void) //__interrupt void nmi_ (void) removed for mspgcc { do { IFG1 &= ~OFIFG; // Clear OSCFault flag for (i = 0xFFF; i > 0; i--); // Time for flag to set P1OUT ^= 0x01; // Toggle P1.0 using exclusive-OR } while (IFG1 & OFIFG); // OSCFault flag still set? IE1 |= OFIE; // Enable Osc Fault }
     
     
    For MSPGCC you need to add #include to use the interrupt handlers (EG Interrupt(vector) Handler(void) { }
  15. Like
    bluehash reacted to Beige in POV Text Display   
    Ok, found something to do with the Value Line chips, a Persistence Of Vision display.
     
    Nothing quite like wildly swinging electronics in front of a camera on a long exposure
     

    Oh, and excuse the piezo, was a separate experiment...
     
    Code and big pics can be found at http://www.beigematchbox.co.uk/blog/?p=1518
  16. Like
    bluehash reacted to moonshadow in Remote volume control   
    Click for larger photo
     
    The two voltage regulators at the front provide 3.3v and 5v from a 12v wall wart I had lying around. A gearmotor is driven by a TB6612FNG (the red breakout board in the photo; PWMA is tied high, A0IN/A1IN are tied to P1.6/P1.7 on the msp430, vcc/vmotor/gnd/reset are connected as appropriate). The IR receiver demodulates at 38khz (it was surprisingly difficult to find one that operates at 3.3v, 5v seems to be standard); it is connected to P1.5 on the MSP430. The circuit was built on a breadboard initially, with the launchpad attached and reporting infrared samples to the PC via the USB serial port emulation; this enabled me to reverse engineer the protocol of a spare remote control I had lying around, and cause appropriate buttons to rotate the motor one way or the other.
     
    The final source code (for mspgcc) contains separate modules for decoding the infrared signal and sending debug data over USB; the latter might be of use to someone perhaps I guess. Either of the processors supplied with the Launchpad will work.
     
    A very simple result for all of you I'm sure, but I'm a software guy - this is the first bit of serious electronics I've done in my life! So quite exciting for me
  17. Like
    bluehash reacted to gatesphere in LaunchPad library-TLV5620, w/ example waveform generator   
    Hi all. I've written a quick library to support the TLV5620 8-bit, quad-channel DAC from TI. This is a relatively powerful chip, and available in TI's magnificent sample program, in quantities of up to five in two temperature ranges (C and I).
     
    Anyways, as I'm lazy and don't want to rewrite my blog post here, and as I'd also like to attract more traffic to my blog, I'll just post the link here.
     
    If you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave them here or on my blog. I'll try to answer everything to the best of my knowledge
     
    Blog post:
    http://blog.suspended-chord.info/?c=9
  18. Like
    bluehash reacted to jsolarski in delay function   
    This Delay function is for mspgcc, this is the one suggested by mspgcc to use instead of
    int i = 1237; while(1--); or
    int i; for (i = 0; i <1234; i++);
    mspgcc will usually remove delays like this thinking it is a wast of space.
     
    mspgcc suggest to use an inline function like this example taken from the mspgcc user guide.

    static void __inline__ msp_delay(register unsigned int n) { __asm__ __volatile__( " 1: \n" " dec %[n] \n" " jne 1b \n" : [n] "+r"(n)); }
    call this function when ever you need to do a short delay(or long one lol)
    example

    //"your code" msp_delay(15); //delay //"your code"
     
    you may be able to use this in CCS or IAR but I'm not sure, since I do not have the windows box to run those programs.
  19. Like
    bluehash reacted to gatesphere in Quick and dirty 74HC595 shift register demo   
    Hi all.
     
    In an effort to prototype the shiftOut() function for my MSPhere library, I went ahead and threw together a quick and dirty binary LED counter using the LaunchPad, 8 LEDs, 8 1k resistors (not ideal, but they're the lowest value I had on hand, the rest are packed up to go to campus with me on Sunday), and of course, a 74HC595 shift register.
     
    Basically, you set up the circuit as follows: (all pin numbers are in regards to the '595 chip, information available at http://www.msarnoff.org/chipdb/74595)
    Q0-Q7 (pins 15, 1-7): LED to ground, with suitable resistor in series.
    GND (pin 8): ground, obviously.
    Vcc (pin 16): Vcc, obviously
    MR (pin 10): Vcc.
    OE (pin 13): ground.
    DS (pin 14): P1.0 on the LaunchPad
    RCK (pin 12): P1.1 on the LaunchPad
    SCK (pin 11): P1.2 on the LaunchPad
     
    What the code does is count from 0 to 255, with each count setting the latch pin (RCK, P1.1) low to prevent flashing of the LEDs while shifting bits, and then calls shiftOut(), which breaks the value down into bits, writing them out to DS one at a time, while pulsing SCK low-high in the process to allow the bits to be shifted out. After that, the RCK is brought high again, allowing the LEDs to light in unison. Then there is a delay of 25000 clock cycles to allow the count to be followed by the human eye.
     
    Here's my code:

    // LaunchPad 74HC595 Test // uses a 74HC595 chip to make a binary counter which counts from 0 to 255 and then resets // written by gatesphere/suspended-chord (http://suspended-chord.info/) // 27 August 2010 // placed into the public domain #define __MSP430G2231__ //#define MSBFIRST //uncomment this line to shift bits out in reverse (most significant bit to least significant bit) #include // pins: // P1.0 -> data pin DS (pin 14) // P1.1 -> latch pin RCK (pin 12) // P1.2 -> clock pin SCK (pin 11) #define DATAPIN BIT0 #define CLOCKPIN BIT2 #define LATCHPIN BIT1 void shiftOut(char data); void main() { WDTCTL = WDTPW + WDTHOLD; // kill WDT P1OUT = 0x00; P1DIR = DATAPIN + CLOCKPIN + LATCHPIN; while(1) { volatile unsigned char i = 0; volatile unsigned int j; while (i < 256) { P1OUT &= ~LATCHPIN; // take latch low shiftOut(i); // push out i P1OUT |= LATCHPIN; // enable LEDs i++; for (j = 0; j < 25000; j++); // delay 25000 cycles } } } void shiftOut(char data) { volatile int i; char temp, temp2; #ifdef MSBFIRST // reverse order of the bits for (i = 0; i < 8; i++) { temp = (0x01 & data); data = data >> 1; temp2 = (temp2 << 1) + temp; } data = temp2; #endif for (i = 0; i < 8; i++) { // 8 bits to a char char bittowrite = (0x01 & data); // get bit data = data >> 1; // shift data left if (bittowrite == 1) { // send bit P1OUT |= DATAPIN; } else { P1OUT &= ~DATAPIN; } // pulse clockpin P1DIR |= CLOCKPIN; P1DIR &= ~CLOCKPIN; } }
  20. Like
    bluehash reacted to Sean in basic demo: clocks,timers,interrupts   
    This is probably redundant to some/most, this is just some of my test code on interpreting ti's docs on clocks, timers & interrupts into c, all their example code was in asm which wasn't too helpful for me as I'm pretty much starting from scratch, its been a long time since I've done any programming.
    Its mostly just setting up the clocks,timers, interrupts, and not much of a demo: it uses 3 clocks and blinks. Cpu/software@15.25mhz, wdt, & timer_a1. Wdt & timer_a1 are sourced from aclk/vlo@12khz. software clock runs somewhere from 600ms-700ms, wdt@ ~667ms , timer_a1 @ ~5.46seconds(65545@12khz). The software clock goes in/out of sync with the wdt clock. I didn't put a stop watch to the wdt, or timera1 to check for accuracy, if ti's docs &my math are correct wdt/timera1 should be good enough for my purposes
    Anyways here's my code I hope it helps someone:

    #include "msp430.h" int main(void) { /*PIN SETTINGS*/ P1DIR = 1|2|4|8|16|32|64|128; P1OUT=32|64; // p1.x dir=output /*CPU, CLOCK SETTINGS*/ //SET CPU @ ~15.25MHZ refer to chip datasheet for speed settings DCOCTL = DCO1|DCO0 ; //DCOx = 3, MODx=0 BCSCTL1 = RSEL3|RSEL2|RSEL1|RSEL0; //RSELx =15 /*CLK Dividers, _3:/8 _2:/4 _1:/2 _0:/1 */ BCSCTL2 = DIVM_0|DIVS_0|DIVA_0; //MCLK|SMCLK|ACLK BCSCTL3 = LFXT1S_2; //ACLK=VLO:12kHz /* WATCHDOG, TIMER , INTERRUPT SETTINGS*/ _BIS_SR(GIE); // enable interrupts WDTCTL = WDT_ADLY_250; // ~667ms@12khz using aclock:vlo IE1 |= WDTIE; //enable wdt interrupt TACTL = TASSEL_1|ID_0|MC_2|TAIE; //aclk:vlo|/0| mode:cont.| TimerA int for(;{ //infinite loop int ms, us; //time scale for (ms=0;ms<34;ms++) //software delay for (us=0;us<0xffff;us++); P1OUT ^= 1|2; //flashes p1.0,p1.1 }; } #pragma vector = WDT_VECTOR,TIMERA1_VECTOR __interrupt void interrupts (void) { switch(TAIV){ //check timer_a1 interrupt cause case TAIV_NONE: //check other interrupts? break; case TAIV_TAIFG: P1OUT ^=64|128; // flashes p1.6,1.7 @ 65545/12khz =~5.46seconds break; }; if (IFG1|=WDTIFG){ //check wdt interrupt flag P1OUT ^=4|8|16|32; //flashes p1.3-1.5 @ 250ms*32khz/12khz=~667ms }; /*clear interrupts*/ TACTL &= ~TAIFG; IFG1 &= ~WDTIFG; };
  21. Like
    bluehash reacted to gatesphere in MSPhere - Arduino-like framework of functions for the MSP430   
    Hello all,
     
    If you've been reading my posts, you might have heard me mention a framework I've been working on for the MSP430 to bring the Arduino functions and programming paradigm to the MSP430--in particular the LaunchPad and compatible devices. Note that this is not a direct port of the Arduino libraries, but original work with a few code snippets whose basic functionality is the same on both architectures littered in.
     
    Well, I've made some progress, and thought I'd start this thread about it. I will update this first post as time goes on, linking all of my blog articles to this post, and eventually my code.
     
    Current news is on my blog as always, but here's a post list:
    Introductory post - in which I detail the first steps of my work, potential future trajectory, and explain the name a bit. (Thanks NJC!)
    Update 1 - in which I announce the wiki and homepage for the framework.
    Update 2 - in which I lay bare my progress towards an initial release.
     
    Anyone is welcome to contribute anything they wish, and it will be released under the GNU GPLv3 when it's been completed a bit more.
     
    EDIT 26August2010: I have started a wiki section for this framework. It is available here.
    EDIT 31August2010: I have posted a small homepage for the framework. It contains useful links. It is available here.
    EDIT 08September2010: I have posted an update to the blog enumerating how far I've come with it, and which hurdles lie ahead before an initial release. Link above, see "Update 2".
  22. Like
    bluehash reacted to gatesphere in ADC10 Example - a photo-sensitive noise maker   
    Hey all,
     
    I made up a quick little noise maker to get used to some ADC10 code. Code and information is available on my blog: http://blog.suspended-chord.info/?c=16
     
    Let me know what you think!
    EDIT: New blog post with fixed code: http://blog.suspended-chord.info/?c=17
  23. Like
    bluehash reacted to GeekDoc in Happy Birthday bluehash (23 SEP 2010)   
    Just noticed at the bottom that it is your birthday! Gratz!
     
    I'd have got you something, but I wouldn't know where to send it (and LaunchPads are on backorder ).
     
    -Doc
  24. Like
    bluehash reacted to GeekDoc in Share pics of your workspace setup   
    I was browsing through bluehash's other site, and came across this link showing his workspace (drool):
    http://www.machinegrid.com/2009/12/the-jerker-geek-desk-workbench/
     

     
    Personally, I have a 6-foot folding table in the basement for my workspace (I'll add a pic later).
     
    I would like to see pics of others' set-ups, perhaps with lists/descriptions of their main features/tools. At the very least, it would give a reason to clean up your work area! (As I must do before taking a pic. :oops: )
     
    Anyone willing to share? Post pics of your coding/building areas (mine are separate) and the tools/equipment in them.
     
    -Doc
  25. Like
    bluehash reacted to GeekDoc in Android Bluetooth Oscilloscope   
    I think I just geeked in my pants! :
     
    http://projectproto.blogspot.com/2010/09/android-bluetooth-oscilloscope.html
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