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G0XAR

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  1. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from energia in Energia compilation errors   
    Hi guys,
     
    Problem solved! I scratched my head for a while, and looked at the messages which seemed to be memory related. Then I thought "Where do I specify the processor type?". Then Guido said "Tools, Board, ect". So I did this and recompiled. Result 0 errors.
     
    It might be a good idea for the next release of Energia to ask the user to specify a processor at compilation time if none is specified. Something as simple as a message saying "You must specify a target processor before compilation" followed by the compilation failing might do. For a beginner what happened to me could be very confusing. 
     
    Thanks for all the fine effort and have a great Christmas,
     
    Steve
  2. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from bluehash in [SOLVED] Hitachi character LCD not working with the "Hello World" Energia Sketch   
    Hi Guys,
     
    I have solved the problem. I started from scratch with a new plugable breadboard and launchpad board and everything works. I have no idea what caused the problem but thats life...
     
    Anyway, thanks for the help. 
     
    Steve
  3. Like
    G0XAR reacted to rockets4kids in [SOLVED] Hitachi character LCD not working with the "Hello World" Energia Sketch   
    The startup timing on these LCDs is very sensitive.  The ones I have seem to be particularly slow (through still in spec) and the timing constants in many libraries cause it to fail like this.  Drove me nuts when I was trying to get one working for the first time.
     
    I don't know anything about the timing in the Energia libs, but you might want to get confirmation on that.
  4. Like
    G0XAR reacted to spirilis in New MSP430F5529 USB Launchpad Released   
    My impression is no.  They talked of giving us "more choice" by adding this board so I don't think the old one will go away.  I do wonder if they'll eventually refresh it with the eZ-FET though.
  5. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from spirilis in TI Back to School Promotion   
    Hi guys,
     
    Very interesting dissection. If you need different or wider frequency coverage there are a couple of other options. At the lowest price range you can simply get a DVB/TV dongle like this one https://www.cosycave.co.uk/product.php?id_product=282 and choose from a number of public domain software packages. 
     
    I have one of these http://sdr-kits.net/VNWA3_Description.html which is very good for antenna analysis.
     
    Hope this helps..
     
    Steve
  6. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from Rei Vilo in Book Review: Getting Started with the MSP430 LaunchPad   
    Graham,
     
    I think you have missed the point here and quoted me out of context. The book is aimed at beginners to learn program using Energia, not "C". Had you taken a look at the book you might have realised this. My comments were made with beginners in mind. 
     
    So when @LRS asked the question "So this is for energia? Not to learn msp430 programming in C assembly?" I told him as much in the simplest way possible, in a way that a beginner, whose first language is not English, might understand. And I gave the guy details of a book that will help him or her to learn these skills. I think that was a fair and reasonable response and I gave the guy good advice. 
     
    You say "I take exception to the assertion that Energia is not C.  Energia is pure C / C++. It is nothing more than a library of C / C++ functions that provide a high-level way to access some of the 430's functions, accessed through an IDE that simplifies linking."
     
    I find this somwhat confusing and, to use your word, "inaccurate". C and C++ are different programming languages. C++ is a superset of C. If you don't believe me check  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatibility_of_C_and_C%2B%2B . You shouldn't confuse the two, which do you mean, pure C or pure C++?. Your use of the word pure implies it has to be one, or the other, but not both, as they are different languages. (To inject some humour at this point, for readers who are totally bored with this nit picking,  read Linus Torvald's irreverent critique of C++ here  http://harmful.cat-v.org/software/c++/linus who makes many points I totally agree with. Which is why I kept my first and second editions of Kernighan and Richie and gave the Stroustrup C++ book away). 
     
    As I suspect this discussion could degrade into a flame war I'll leave it there. Life is too short. It's time to have some fun in the workshop and melt solder. 
     
    Cheers,
     
    Steve
  7. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from hungtrinh36 in begin learning msp430fr5739   
    May be Yan can help? He is an MSP430 expert and lives in Vietnam. 
  8. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from roadrunner84 in Book Review: Getting Started with the MSP430 LaunchPad   
    Hi Guys,
     
    I have the book. I am not that impressed with it. I think for a raw beginner who can get hold of the Educational Booster Pack it's probably not too bad. But the Booster Pack seems only to be available in the USA. So to order it from Europe I have to pay for shipping, 20 percent VAT and a customs inspection fee. This turns out to be a very expensive option! OK, so there are instructions to use a breadboard. This is good but you still have to buy the sensors and the same applies. If you can't find a local stockist you have to order these from the USA... :-( . I would have preferred to see a breadboard only approach using commonly available parts. 
     
    Anyway, back to the book. Firstly the book is in black and white, colour would have been better for the wiring diagrams and pictures of the launchpad board. If you take a look at the appendix you will see a bad black and white scan of the nice colour picture of the board available on this site, together with the pin names etc. Also the diagrams drawn with Fritzing are confusing in monochrome. Light grey against dark grey or white is not good, especially if your hair is grey (as mine is) and you don't have teenage eyes any more...If you don't believe me take a look at the diagram on page 64 and try to find the switch! May be some hand drawn sketches would have been better. And there are also places in the text where the authors talk about coloured wires in the diagrams!
     
    Secondly the book uses Energia. Don't get me wrong. I like Energia and am very enthusiastic that it is available. But it is not without faults. If you try to do Project 9 which uses the serial monitor it probably will not work. I tried this on a Mac, and on a Windows 7 PC and both did not work. There is a known bug with the OS/X implementation which permanently screwed up the serial port assignments, and on my Windows 7 system I get no output. As I understand it to get it to work the user has to change some settings on J3, I'll try this later today. But the book does not tell you to do this. It just assumes that everything will work. As this book is aimed at beginners this is a bad mistake. 
     
    Thirdly, may be I am old fashioned but I like a text book to have an index at the back. 
     
    Lastly in 10.3 the authors refer to communications protocols as languages. This is unusual to say the least. No one else does this to my knowledge
     
    Writing a technical book for beginners is a difficult thing to do, I know because I tried. And I really wish Adrian and Dang the best of luck with it. At the moment it is the only beginners book I know of for the MSP430. I hope they take the above points into account if they ever do a second edition. 
     
    If you have finished this book, or are looking for something more advanced, I would like to suggest some helpful references :-
     
    MSP430 Microcontroller Basics by John H. Davis ISBN 978-0-7506-8276-3      This is a good but a little dated book on how the processor chip works. Chapter 7 about interfacing is very good for those of you with some electronics background. The book is not for beginners but if you have done some "C" programming and worked with other microcontrollers you will benefit from it. 
     
    http://dbindner.freeshell.org/msp430/  takes you to some nice examples, in "C", using the GCC toolchain hosted on Linux. He starts out with a launchpad board and some "blinky" code and explores aspects of the processor. His explanations are clear as is is code (which is more than I can say for many "C" programmers ;-) ) . And he is a radio ham!
     
    Hope this helps,
     
    Steve G0XAR
  9. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from OppaErich in Book Review: Getting Started with the MSP430 LaunchPad   
    Hi Guys,
     
    I have the book. I am not that impressed with it. I think for a raw beginner who can get hold of the Educational Booster Pack it's probably not too bad. But the Booster Pack seems only to be available in the USA. So to order it from Europe I have to pay for shipping, 20 percent VAT and a customs inspection fee. This turns out to be a very expensive option! OK, so there are instructions to use a breadboard. This is good but you still have to buy the sensors and the same applies. If you can't find a local stockist you have to order these from the USA... :-( . I would have preferred to see a breadboard only approach using commonly available parts. 
     
    Anyway, back to the book. Firstly the book is in black and white, colour would have been better for the wiring diagrams and pictures of the launchpad board. If you take a look at the appendix you will see a bad black and white scan of the nice colour picture of the board available on this site, together with the pin names etc. Also the diagrams drawn with Fritzing are confusing in monochrome. Light grey against dark grey or white is not good, especially if your hair is grey (as mine is) and you don't have teenage eyes any more...If you don't believe me take a look at the diagram on page 64 and try to find the switch! May be some hand drawn sketches would have been better. And there are also places in the text where the authors talk about coloured wires in the diagrams!
     
    Secondly the book uses Energia. Don't get me wrong. I like Energia and am very enthusiastic that it is available. But it is not without faults. If you try to do Project 9 which uses the serial monitor it probably will not work. I tried this on a Mac, and on a Windows 7 PC and both did not work. There is a known bug with the OS/X implementation which permanently screwed up the serial port assignments, and on my Windows 7 system I get no output. As I understand it to get it to work the user has to change some settings on J3, I'll try this later today. But the book does not tell you to do this. It just assumes that everything will work. As this book is aimed at beginners this is a bad mistake. 
     
    Thirdly, may be I am old fashioned but I like a text book to have an index at the back. 
     
    Lastly in 10.3 the authors refer to communications protocols as languages. This is unusual to say the least. No one else does this to my knowledge
     
    Writing a technical book for beginners is a difficult thing to do, I know because I tried. And I really wish Adrian and Dang the best of luck with it. At the moment it is the only beginners book I know of for the MSP430. I hope they take the above points into account if they ever do a second edition. 
     
    If you have finished this book, or are looking for something more advanced, I would like to suggest some helpful references :-
     
    MSP430 Microcontroller Basics by John H. Davis ISBN 978-0-7506-8276-3      This is a good but a little dated book on how the processor chip works. Chapter 7 about interfacing is very good for those of you with some electronics background. The book is not for beginners but if you have done some "C" programming and worked with other microcontrollers you will benefit from it. 
     
    http://dbindner.freeshell.org/msp430/  takes you to some nice examples, in "C", using the GCC toolchain hosted on Linux. He starts out with a launchpad board and some "blinky" code and explores aspects of the processor. His explanations are clear as is is code (which is more than I can say for many "C" programmers ;-) ) . And he is a radio ham!
     
    Hope this helps,
     
    Steve G0XAR
  10. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from oPossum in Book Review: Getting Started with the MSP430 LaunchPad   
    Hi Guys,
     
    I have the book. I am not that impressed with it. I think for a raw beginner who can get hold of the Educational Booster Pack it's probably not too bad. But the Booster Pack seems only to be available in the USA. So to order it from Europe I have to pay for shipping, 20 percent VAT and a customs inspection fee. This turns out to be a very expensive option! OK, so there are instructions to use a breadboard. This is good but you still have to buy the sensors and the same applies. If you can't find a local stockist you have to order these from the USA... :-( . I would have preferred to see a breadboard only approach using commonly available parts. 
     
    Anyway, back to the book. Firstly the book is in black and white, colour would have been better for the wiring diagrams and pictures of the launchpad board. If you take a look at the appendix you will see a bad black and white scan of the nice colour picture of the board available on this site, together with the pin names etc. Also the diagrams drawn with Fritzing are confusing in monochrome. Light grey against dark grey or white is not good, especially if your hair is grey (as mine is) and you don't have teenage eyes any more...If you don't believe me take a look at the diagram on page 64 and try to find the switch! May be some hand drawn sketches would have been better. And there are also places in the text where the authors talk about coloured wires in the diagrams!
     
    Secondly the book uses Energia. Don't get me wrong. I like Energia and am very enthusiastic that it is available. But it is not without faults. If you try to do Project 9 which uses the serial monitor it probably will not work. I tried this on a Mac, and on a Windows 7 PC and both did not work. There is a known bug with the OS/X implementation which permanently screwed up the serial port assignments, and on my Windows 7 system I get no output. As I understand it to get it to work the user has to change some settings on J3, I'll try this later today. But the book does not tell you to do this. It just assumes that everything will work. As this book is aimed at beginners this is a bad mistake. 
     
    Thirdly, may be I am old fashioned but I like a text book to have an index at the back. 
     
    Lastly in 10.3 the authors refer to communications protocols as languages. This is unusual to say the least. No one else does this to my knowledge
     
    Writing a technical book for beginners is a difficult thing to do, I know because I tried. And I really wish Adrian and Dang the best of luck with it. At the moment it is the only beginners book I know of for the MSP430. I hope they take the above points into account if they ever do a second edition. 
     
    If you have finished this book, or are looking for something more advanced, I would like to suggest some helpful references :-
     
    MSP430 Microcontroller Basics by John H. Davis ISBN 978-0-7506-8276-3      This is a good but a little dated book on how the processor chip works. Chapter 7 about interfacing is very good for those of you with some electronics background. The book is not for beginners but if you have done some "C" programming and worked with other microcontrollers you will benefit from it. 
     
    http://dbindner.freeshell.org/msp430/  takes you to some nice examples, in "C", using the GCC toolchain hosted on Linux. He starts out with a launchpad board and some "blinky" code and explores aspects of the processor. His explanations are clear as is is code (which is more than I can say for many "C" programmers ;-) ) . And he is a radio ham!
     
    Hope this helps,
     
    Steve G0XAR
  11. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from spirilis in Book Review: Getting Started with the MSP430 LaunchPad   
    Hi Guys,
     
    I have the book. I am not that impressed with it. I think for a raw beginner who can get hold of the Educational Booster Pack it's probably not too bad. But the Booster Pack seems only to be available in the USA. So to order it from Europe I have to pay for shipping, 20 percent VAT and a customs inspection fee. This turns out to be a very expensive option! OK, so there are instructions to use a breadboard. This is good but you still have to buy the sensors and the same applies. If you can't find a local stockist you have to order these from the USA... :-( . I would have preferred to see a breadboard only approach using commonly available parts. 
     
    Anyway, back to the book. Firstly the book is in black and white, colour would have been better for the wiring diagrams and pictures of the launchpad board. If you take a look at the appendix you will see a bad black and white scan of the nice colour picture of the board available on this site, together with the pin names etc. Also the diagrams drawn with Fritzing are confusing in monochrome. Light grey against dark grey or white is not good, especially if your hair is grey (as mine is) and you don't have teenage eyes any more...If you don't believe me take a look at the diagram on page 64 and try to find the switch! May be some hand drawn sketches would have been better. And there are also places in the text where the authors talk about coloured wires in the diagrams!
     
    Secondly the book uses Energia. Don't get me wrong. I like Energia and am very enthusiastic that it is available. But it is not without faults. If you try to do Project 9 which uses the serial monitor it probably will not work. I tried this on a Mac, and on a Windows 7 PC and both did not work. There is a known bug with the OS/X implementation which permanently screwed up the serial port assignments, and on my Windows 7 system I get no output. As I understand it to get it to work the user has to change some settings on J3, I'll try this later today. But the book does not tell you to do this. It just assumes that everything will work. As this book is aimed at beginners this is a bad mistake. 
     
    Thirdly, may be I am old fashioned but I like a text book to have an index at the back. 
     
    Lastly in 10.3 the authors refer to communications protocols as languages. This is unusual to say the least. No one else does this to my knowledge
     
    Writing a technical book for beginners is a difficult thing to do, I know because I tried. And I really wish Adrian and Dang the best of luck with it. At the moment it is the only beginners book I know of for the MSP430. I hope they take the above points into account if they ever do a second edition. 
     
    If you have finished this book, or are looking for something more advanced, I would like to suggest some helpful references :-
     
    MSP430 Microcontroller Basics by John H. Davis ISBN 978-0-7506-8276-3      This is a good but a little dated book on how the processor chip works. Chapter 7 about interfacing is very good for those of you with some electronics background. The book is not for beginners but if you have done some "C" programming and worked with other microcontrollers you will benefit from it. 
     
    http://dbindner.freeshell.org/msp430/  takes you to some nice examples, in "C", using the GCC toolchain hosted on Linux. He starts out with a launchpad board and some "blinky" code and explores aspects of the processor. His explanations are clear as is is code (which is more than I can say for many "C" programmers ;-) ) . And he is a radio ham!
     
    Hope this helps,
     
    Steve G0XAR
  12. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from bluehash in Book Review: Getting Started with the MSP430 LaunchPad   
    Hi Guys,
     
    I have the book. I am not that impressed with it. I think for a raw beginner who can get hold of the Educational Booster Pack it's probably not too bad. But the Booster Pack seems only to be available in the USA. So to order it from Europe I have to pay for shipping, 20 percent VAT and a customs inspection fee. This turns out to be a very expensive option! OK, so there are instructions to use a breadboard. This is good but you still have to buy the sensors and the same applies. If you can't find a local stockist you have to order these from the USA... :-( . I would have preferred to see a breadboard only approach using commonly available parts. 
     
    Anyway, back to the book. Firstly the book is in black and white, colour would have been better for the wiring diagrams and pictures of the launchpad board. If you take a look at the appendix you will see a bad black and white scan of the nice colour picture of the board available on this site, together with the pin names etc. Also the diagrams drawn with Fritzing are confusing in monochrome. Light grey against dark grey or white is not good, especially if your hair is grey (as mine is) and you don't have teenage eyes any more...If you don't believe me take a look at the diagram on page 64 and try to find the switch! May be some hand drawn sketches would have been better. And there are also places in the text where the authors talk about coloured wires in the diagrams!
     
    Secondly the book uses Energia. Don't get me wrong. I like Energia and am very enthusiastic that it is available. But it is not without faults. If you try to do Project 9 which uses the serial monitor it probably will not work. I tried this on a Mac, and on a Windows 7 PC and both did not work. There is a known bug with the OS/X implementation which permanently screwed up the serial port assignments, and on my Windows 7 system I get no output. As I understand it to get it to work the user has to change some settings on J3, I'll try this later today. But the book does not tell you to do this. It just assumes that everything will work. As this book is aimed at beginners this is a bad mistake. 
     
    Thirdly, may be I am old fashioned but I like a text book to have an index at the back. 
     
    Lastly in 10.3 the authors refer to communications protocols as languages. This is unusual to say the least. No one else does this to my knowledge
     
    Writing a technical book for beginners is a difficult thing to do, I know because I tried. And I really wish Adrian and Dang the best of luck with it. At the moment it is the only beginners book I know of for the MSP430. I hope they take the above points into account if they ever do a second edition. 
     
    If you have finished this book, or are looking for something more advanced, I would like to suggest some helpful references :-
     
    MSP430 Microcontroller Basics by John H. Davis ISBN 978-0-7506-8276-3      This is a good but a little dated book on how the processor chip works. Chapter 7 about interfacing is very good for those of you with some electronics background. The book is not for beginners but if you have done some "C" programming and worked with other microcontrollers you will benefit from it. 
     
    http://dbindner.freeshell.org/msp430/  takes you to some nice examples, in "C", using the GCC toolchain hosted on Linux. He starts out with a launchpad board and some "blinky" code and explores aspects of the processor. His explanations are clear as is is code (which is more than I can say for many "C" programmers ;-) ) . And he is a radio ham!
     
    Hope this helps,
     
    Steve G0XAR
  13. Like
    G0XAR reacted to Lgbeno in serial comms between Java app and MSP430   
    Here's my project directory,
     
    C code for msp430:
    https://github.com/lgbeno/BLDC-Booster/tree/master/firmware/src
    See serial.c
     
    Python code for GUI:
    https://github.com/lgbeno/BLDC-Booster/tree/master/python
    See bldc_booster_api.py for serial comms portion
    See bldc_booster_app.py for the GUI code
     
    The bldc_booster.ui file is the design file from QT designer which is the run through a script to automatically create bldc_booster_ui.py
     
  14. Like
    G0XAR reacted to Lgbeno in serial comms between Java app and MSP430   
    My other suggestion would be using python and QT. I'm a pretty novice software guy but found this to be very easy. I could even point you to some sample code that I have on github if interested.
  15. Like
    G0XAR reacted to RichardVowles in serial comms between Java app and MSP430   
    If you are familiar with Java, I'd recommend that you use Griffon - it uses the JVM and Groovy to make a nice IDE development environment. If you use Jetbrain's free IDEA community edition, you get the latest Groovy support as well, Netbeans appears to have been back-burnered by Oracle. 
     
    The libraries are easy to get and use - if you just download the Arduino IDE, install it, right click on the Arduino IDE and choose Show Package Contents, in Contents/Resources/Java you'll find the library you need - librxtxSerial.jnilib and the necessary JAR file - RXTXcomm.jar 
     
    You can check the architectures supported under Mac OS by typing
     
    file librxtxSerial.jnilib
     
    into the terminal window when in that directory. 
     
    The examples on how to actually use the RXTX library are here:
     
    http://rxtx.qbang.org/wiki/index.php/Examples
  16. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from abecedarian in Free to a good home.......   
    I have a single copy of "Understanding Microprocessors" written by the Ti Instruments Learning Centre Staff in 1979 and published by the Tandy Corporation under the Radio Shack brand.....even in those days Ti had 16 bit processors namely the TMS9900 family, before I guess most people on this forum were born. 
     
    Free to the person who comes up with the best reason for wanting it....I'll pay the shipping costs....
     
    Regards,
     
    Steve
  17. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from SirPatrick in Free to a good home.......   
    I have a single copy of "Understanding Microprocessors" written by the Ti Instruments Learning Centre Staff in 1979 and published by the Tandy Corporation under the Radio Shack brand.....even in those days Ti had 16 bit processors namely the TMS9900 family, before I guess most people on this forum were born. 
     
    Free to the person who comes up with the best reason for wanting it....I'll pay the shipping costs....
     
    Regards,
     
    Steve
  18. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from sirri in Countdown to 21 of December with MSP430 :]   
    I think the Mayans were using a pre release version of Windows 8 when they did their calculations :-)
  19. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from abecedarian in Gender bending headers   
    Hi guys,
     
    For those of you who find the male headers on the Launchpad 430 board annoying and do not want to go to the bother of unsoldering them and replacing them with female ones there is a solution. You can get male to female wires for breadboard use from any number of people on EBay for not a lot of cash. One example advert is here (this is not an endorsement and I don't know the trader but a picture is worth a thousand words):
     
     http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Arduino-20cm-MALE-TO-FEMALE-Solderless-Jumper-Breadboard-Wires-40-Cable-Pack-/130807140502?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Components_Supplies_ET&hash=item1e74b69096
     
    The female ends on the ones I have are slim enough to fit on a single male pin without obstructing the next pin so you can use all the pins :-)
     
    These are really useful if you like to work with breadboards. You can also find male, to male, female to female and some with "butchers hooks" on them which will clip to leaded components. 
     
    If anyone from Ti is reading this it would be really neat if you included both male and female headers as now but left them unsoldered to give us more choice. 
     
    Hope this helps....
     
    Steve
     
     
  20. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from abecedarian in which development tools for a beginner?   
    As installed the CCS does not have a terminal plug in to monitor a COM port. However thanks to my good friend Guido, PE1NZZ (this is his ham radio call sign - I mention it as a matter of politeness to him) I managed to install one. This is what you have to do :-
     
    Start CCS.
     
    Select HELP then INSTALL NEW SOFTWARE
     
    Add repository http://download.eclipse.org/dsdp/tm/updates/3.3
    and then
    open TM and RSE 3.3.1 Main features
    and select Target Management Terminal
    and then continue
    and restart CCS
     
    Once CCS is restarted you can access the terminal plug in by :-
    go to Window > Show View > Other then select Terminal
    The plug in should then start.
    You need to tell the plug in about the serial port you wish to monitor. In my case I was trying out the example temperature monitor application on the MSP-EXP430G2 Launchpad board. In Windows 7 click on Control Panel, then View Devices and Printers you should see an icon for the MPS430 UART, click on that, then on the Properties tab. This should tell you which COM port has the MPS430. Make a note of this.
    Co back to CCS and the Terminal plug in. There is a little icon for settings. Click on that. Then fill in the form for :
    <the MSP430 COM port> 2400baud 8,N,1 then save these. If all is well you should see a string of characters something like :JJJKKKK. Putting your finger on the chip will raise their value e.g LLLMMMNNN....
    Thats it.
    If anyone from TI reads this I should make the point that installing AVR Studio and WinAVR is a lot easier and faster than CCS and it is free without any restrictions on the size of the object code. But on the positive side the Launchpad board can be programmed directly whereas the AVR requires an additional hardware programmer which can cost
  21. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from pine in Chip on glass LCD displays   
    Hi Guys,
     
    I found these
     
    http://www.rapidonline.com/Electronic-Components/Chip-on-Glass-2x16-Negative-Mode-STN-White-on-Blue-I2C-40x8mm-57-2332
     
    and have ordered a couple. The interface is I2C and they can run off 3 volts. Handy if you are running out of I/O pins. I thought the price was pretty good, I wonder if anyone else has used them. The data sheet is very comprehensive so it should not be too difficult to get the 430 to talk to it (I hope).
     
    Before anyone asks, I don't work for Rapid Electronics, but I do spend far too much money with them :-(
     
    Hope this helps,
     
    Steve
  22. Like
    G0XAR reacted to cde in Chip on glass LCD displays   
    Nice, low profile. Did you get a 5v or 3v version though? The website says it's 5v, and the mpn (manufacturer product numbers) they list all lack the 16th digit, meaning not 3v versions.
     
    Datasheet shows logic works at 3.3v, but power would need 5v. Considering the pinout for the 5v vs the 3v version, the 3v version has an added charge pump type regulator (the capacitors they need gives this away).
     
    You can always try powering from launchpad usb 5v testpoint, but keep i2c with the 3.5v vcc.
  23. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from bluehash in Chip on glass LCD displays   
    Hi Guys,
     
    I found these
     
    http://www.rapidonline.com/Electronic-Components/Chip-on-Glass-2x16-Negative-Mode-STN-White-on-Blue-I2C-40x8mm-57-2332
     
    and have ordered a couple. The interface is I2C and they can run off 3 volts. Handy if you are running out of I/O pins. I thought the price was pretty good, I wonder if anyone else has used them. The data sheet is very comprehensive so it should not be too difficult to get the 430 to talk to it (I hope).
     
    Before anyone asks, I don't work for Rapid Electronics, but I do spend far too much money with them :-(
     
    Hope this helps,
     
    Steve
  24. Like
    G0XAR reacted to tonesenna in About the MSP430 clocks.   
    It depends on the device and the supply voltage applied to them.
    Typical maximum frequencies are 8, 16 and 25 MHz.
     
    The best to do is actually check the datasheet for the particular device that you're interested in.
  25. Like
    G0XAR got a reaction from GeekDoc in which development tools for a beginner?   
    As installed the CCS does not have a terminal plug in to monitor a COM port. However thanks to my good friend Guido, PE1NZZ (this is his ham radio call sign - I mention it as a matter of politeness to him) I managed to install one. This is what you have to do :-
     
    Start CCS.
     
    Select HELP then INSTALL NEW SOFTWARE
     
    Add repository http://download.eclipse.org/dsdp/tm/updates/3.3
    and then
    open TM and RSE 3.3.1 Main features
    and select Target Management Terminal
    and then continue
    and restart CCS
     
    Once CCS is restarted you can access the terminal plug in by :-
    go to Window > Show View > Other then select Terminal
    The plug in should then start.
    You need to tell the plug in about the serial port you wish to monitor. In my case I was trying out the example temperature monitor application on the MSP-EXP430G2 Launchpad board. In Windows 7 click on Control Panel, then View Devices and Printers you should see an icon for the MPS430 UART, click on that, then on the Properties tab. This should tell you which COM port has the MPS430. Make a note of this.
    Co back to CCS and the Terminal plug in. There is a little icon for settings. Click on that. Then fill in the form for :
    <the MSP430 COM port> 2400baud 8,N,1 then save these. If all is well you should see a string of characters something like :JJJKKKK. Putting your finger on the chip will raise their value e.g LLLMMMNNN....
    Thats it.
    If anyone from TI reads this I should make the point that installing AVR Studio and WinAVR is a lot easier and faster than CCS and it is free without any restrictions on the size of the object code. But on the positive side the Launchpad board can be programmed directly whereas the AVR requires an additional hardware programmer which can cost
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