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AGlass0fMilk

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  1. Like
    AGlass0fMilk got a reaction from Rickta59 in MSP430-Based DIY DJ Controller   
    I said I'd post it when I was done, so here it is! It's a Laser-cut USB DJ Controller made with two MSP430G2553s and an MCP3008 ADC. Check out the Instructable I made for more information about the build. If you like it, please vote for it in the contests I entered! Thanks guys!
     
    Instructables Link
     
    Representing the 43Oh!

  2. Like
    AGlass0fMilk reacted to cde in MSP430-Based DIY DJ Controller   
    Wow, that's REALLY indepth.
     
    As a side note, have you thought of making a native USB Midi adaptor on a Tiva or F5529 launchpad? You probably have the skill to do it. At that point, no drivers or processing would be needed, as you would do a usb class compliant device.
  3. Like
    AGlass0fMilk got a reaction from roadrunner84 in MSP430-Based DIY DJ Controller   
    I said I'd post it when I was done, so here it is! It's a Laser-cut USB DJ Controller made with two MSP430G2553s and an MCP3008 ADC. Check out the Instructable I made for more information about the build. If you like it, please vote for it in the contests I entered! Thanks guys!
     
    Instructables Link
     
    Representing the 43Oh!

  4. Like
    AGlass0fMilk got a reaction from RobG in MSP430-Based DIY DJ Controller   
    I said I'd post it when I was done, so here it is! It's a Laser-cut USB DJ Controller made with two MSP430G2553s and an MCP3008 ADC. Check out the Instructable I made for more information about the build. If you like it, please vote for it in the contests I entered! Thanks guys!
     
    Instructables Link
     
    Representing the 43Oh!

  5. Like
    AGlass0fMilk got a reaction from cde in MSP430-Based DIY DJ Controller   
    I said I'd post it when I was done, so here it is! It's a Laser-cut USB DJ Controller made with two MSP430G2553s and an MCP3008 ADC. Check out the Instructable I made for more information about the build. If you like it, please vote for it in the contests I entered! Thanks guys!
     
    Instructables Link
     
    Representing the 43Oh!

  6. Like
    AGlass0fMilk got a reaction from abecedarian in Analog Input Smooth - Comparisons Don't Work   
    Wow guys... I've been working with this code for so long and never even realized it was the OR operator in the if statement... I feel so embarrassed. I've been programming for a few years now, even on MSP430.
     
    Hahaha, I guess it really takes a few fresh eyes to pick out the little mistakes like that. I will recompile it with the && operator when I have the change and see how much it improves.
     
    I may try the running average idea. I could also try upping the sample count and balance the latency with the stableness of the readings.
     
    Also, the purpose of the check for absolute mins/maxs (0/1023) is so that if I have a previous sent value, for example 1018, it's in the sensitivity range so 1023 will never be sent. I will never register totally 0 or totally 1023, which is critical for my project. Therefore, I have to explicitly check to see if it's a max/min value, and then send it if it hasn't been sent before.
     
    I'll check back with you guys again if I have anymore problems. Thanks again for catching my dumb mistakes!
  7. Like
    AGlass0fMilk reacted to roadrunner84 in Limitations of UART (G2553)   
    Noise is a very separate sport, it does very much depend on what you consider noise and what you consider signal.
    For the most simple cases you can get away with a simple 1st order low-pass filter; suppress all frequencies above a certain setpoint.
    In this case, have a series resistor and a parallel capacitor:

    The product of R (in ohms) and C (in farads) should be equal to 1/(2pi F), where F is your desired -3dB (50% suppression) frequency, from thereon every order of frequency (every 10 times as high a frequency) will be suppressed by another 10dB (90% suppression).
    So if I want to suppress frequencies above 20kHz, I need R and C to produce the value of 1/(2pi 20,000) = 7.957,747*10-6 or about 8 micro ohmfarad. If I choose a capacitor of 22nF, I would need a resistor of 361.71 ohms, which is close to 360 ohms (which is a readily available resistor).
    This means that 20kHz will be suppressed to 50% of its original amplitude, 200kHz will be suppressed to about 10%, 2MHz to about 1%, 20MHz to about 0.1% etc.
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