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gmtii

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  1. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from lssyczy in [Energia Library] ILI9341 TFT 2.2 port   
    hi,
     
    I've ported the Seeed library for cheap ebay 2.2 inch ILI9341 displays (only tested on Stellaris),
     
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1PC-2-2-Inch-SPI-TFT-LCD-Serial-Port-Module-Display-ILI9341-5V-3-3V-New-/200948143239?pt=Cake_Decorating_Supplies&hash=item2ec9715487
     
    https://github.com/gmtii/ILI9341_energia
     
     
    Saludos!


  2. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from StrangerM in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    hi,
     
    this is how to setup an ais server with your rpi, cubieboard or beaglebone, dAISy and Marinetraffic. This is how I did but I'm sure there are better ways to do it ...
     
    When you a server @ Marinetraffic,  they'll send an email with IP and unique port where you have to send dAISys output, e.g. 5.9.207.224 7604. We have to redirect dAISy serial output to this IP and unique port with some awful scripts:
     
    First, install screen utility: sudo apt-get install screen
     
    Plug dAISY USB and check if /dev/ttyACM0 is there; if not, then you need a kernel with support for  CDC_ACM devices;  rpi, cubieboard or beaglebone stock kernels should support these out the box.
     
    Test if your dAISy is working with any serial terminal of your choice as minicom or just enter 'screen /dev/ttyACM0'. (CTRL+A and K to exit from screen session). This is how AIS sentences looks like:
     
    !AIVDM,1,1,,A,1CF4kT3000Nm`Kl@BHKJC@IH0000,0*37
    !AIVDM,1,1,,B,4028jOQur1laeNlMIL@<`8O00@JU,0*5F
     
    We'll use this script to redirect serial output to Marinetraffic site; if connection is dropped, it'll reconnect in 5 seconds:
     
    #!/bin/sh
    while true;
            do
            echo "Start: " `date`
            nc 5.9.207.224 7604 < /dev/ttyACM0
            echo "Restart: " `date`
            sleep 5
            done
    done
     
    5.- save as /home/foo/ais.sh
    6.- run the script in a separate console with this command: "screen -dmS ais sh /home/foo/ais.sh". You can connect with this console with this command "screen -r ais" and kill it with CTRL+A and the press K.
     
    From now you can logout and let the box running alone. Add before exit(0) @ /etc/rc.local if you want automatic startup...
     
    Esteban.
  3. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    Congratulations! you have put a lot of time and effort into dAISy and I hope you will sell thousands!
     
    btw, my daisy is sharing data to marinetraffics web using a esp8266. Attached is the code using the arduino esp8266 (https://github.com/esp8266/Arduino).
     
    gmtii.
     
     
    daisy.ino
  4. Like
    gmtii reacted to chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    Ain't she pretty?

     
     
  5. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    Hi,
     
    Extract from the lna4all site:
     
    I bought the filter, should I put it before the LNA ?
     
     
    Inserting the filter before the LNA (between the antenna and the LNA) will spoil the noise figure roughly for the filter insertion losses expressed in dB. So the S/N will also be degraded for the same figure.
     
     
    I bought the filter, should I put it after the LNA ?
     
     
    Inserting the filter after the LNA (between the LNA and the dongle) will leave the LNA widely opened to the strong signals. This may be fine if you have the high IP3 LNA.
     
     
    OK, where should I insert the filter then ?
     
     
    If you aim for the weak signals reception and you have the high IP3 LNA you need to install the filter after the LNA. If your LNA can not stand the strong blockers (broadcast TV, Radio, Cell towers) you need to protect it with the filter, otherwise the LNA may produce reach intermodulation products that may be spread all over the frequencies masking the other signals on the band. More over the result may be a bunch of phantom signals that are not existing on the bands.
     
    Hope it helps :-)
     
    Enviado desde mi SGP321 mediante Tapatalk
  6. Like
    gmtii reacted to spirilis in MSP430G2955 PCBs Available   
    Thread with the details of that PCB I think- http://forum.43oh.com/topic/3594-msp430g2955-launchpad-development/
  7. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from bluehash in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    hi,
     
    dAISy USB has a solid and excellent sensitivity ...with a simple 1$ DIY electrical wire copper dipole it can receive ships exceeding 553 nm. - 1000 km !!!!
     
     
    Esteban.
     

  8. Like
    gmtii reacted to igor in Error in Energia Documentation? Current source/sink   
    In at least two places the Energia documentation claims that LaunchPad pins can source or sink up to 40 mA.   Is that true of all (or any) of the launchpads supported by Energia? (i.e., Stellaris/Tiva, Tiva Connected, MSP430, Fraunchpad, C2000, CC3200)   For the Stellaris launchpad, the documentation for the LM4F120 gives drive strength options of 2, 4, or 8 mA, and says up to 4 pins can sink 18 mA.  So where does the 40mA come from (or go to)?  
    Yet energia.nu says: "LaunchPad pins can source (provide positive current) or sink (provide negative current) up to 40 mA (milliamps) of current to other devices/circuits."
      http://energia.nu/guide/tutorial_digitalpins/ http://energia.nu/reference/constants/   I note that the Arduino documentation says the same 40mA, so suspect this specification may have accidentally been copied from the AVR.  If so, seems like an invitation to release the magic smoke.
     
    Please someone either point me to where the documentation says that the various launchpads can source/sink that much, or fix the web site to either include the actual numbers for the various launchpads, or remove the misleading number.
     
    I previously posted this question on stellarisiti (where it failed to generate any action), but just noticed that the web site says to post documentation corrections on the 43oh Energia forums.
  9. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    hi,
     
    this is how to setup an ais server with your rpi, cubieboard or beaglebone, dAISy and Marinetraffic. This is how I did but I'm sure there are better ways to do it ...
     
    When you a server @ Marinetraffic,  they'll send an email with IP and unique port where you have to send dAISys output, e.g. 5.9.207.224 7604. We have to redirect dAISy serial output to this IP and unique port with some awful scripts:
     
    First, install screen utility: sudo apt-get install screen
     
    Plug dAISY USB and check if /dev/ttyACM0 is there; if not, then you need a kernel with support for  CDC_ACM devices;  rpi, cubieboard or beaglebone stock kernels should support these out the box.
     
    Test if your dAISy is working with any serial terminal of your choice as minicom or just enter 'screen /dev/ttyACM0'. (CTRL+A and K to exit from screen session). This is how AIS sentences looks like:
     
    !AIVDM,1,1,,A,1CF4kT3000Nm`Kl@BHKJC@IH0000,0*37
    !AIVDM,1,1,,B,4028jOQur1laeNlMIL@<`8O00@JU,0*5F
     
    We'll use this script to redirect serial output to Marinetraffic site; if connection is dropped, it'll reconnect in 5 seconds:
     
    #!/bin/sh
    while true;
            do
            echo "Start: " `date`
            nc 5.9.207.224 7604 < /dev/ttyACM0
            echo "Restart: " `date`
            sleep 5
            done
    done
     
    5.- save as /home/foo/ais.sh
    6.- run the script in a separate console with this command: "screen -dmS ais sh /home/foo/ais.sh". You can connect with this console with this command "screen -r ais" and kill it with CTRL+A and the press K.
     
    From now you can logout and let the box running alone. Add before exit(0) @ /etc/rc.local if you want automatic startup...
     
    Esteban.
  10. Like
    gmtii reacted to chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    Good news for everyone having difficulties sourcing the Si4362 radio IC.
     
    I verified that the transceiver Si4463 works with dAISy. This probably also applies to Si4460 and Si4461. Besides being more widely available through distributors, more adventurous souls can even find these ICs on Aliexpress.
     
    Even better news for those that want to recreate my project with minimal effort: Si446x based radio modules are sold on eBay and elsewhere.
     
    I bought the E10-M4463D from eBay for $7.99:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/100mw-433MHz-SI4463-Wireless-Transceiver-Module-With-Antenna-2100m-/151243201316
     
    I chose this module over others because all pins of the radio are broken out to headers.

     
    Unfortunately two pins (GPIO2 and GPIO3) are reserved to control the RF switch that connects the antenna with RX or TX channels. But after a few minor changes to my code I had dAISy working.
    Here's the branch on Github: https://github.com/astuder/dAISy/tree/E10-M4463D
     
    The wiring changed:
    GPIO0 -> P2.0
    NIRQ -> P2.5
    GPIO2, GPIO3 -> no longer connected to the LaunchPad
     
    As the modules are built for 433 MHz and AIS is using 162 MHz, I had to replace antenna and passives on the RX side.

    The new passives from left to right are (ignoring the obvious 0-ohm resistors) 11pF, 150nH, 13pF. As you can see the 0603 components are a very tight fit. I reflowed them with a hot air station instead of using a soldering iron. The clunky thing on the right is a BNC connector, SMA probably would have been a more elegant fit
     
    Technically, it's still not ideal. The traces might be impedance matched to the original frequency. However a quick real-world test demonstrated similar sensitivity as my original breakout boards.
     
    EDIT: added wiring information
    EDIT: added link to Github
  11. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    Hi,
     
    DCO modes (even at 8 mhz) don't like LPM4 mode in your code... it works like a charm using LPM0-1-2, 25 mhz DCO, 8 mhz spi, 115200 uart...
     
    so, could the issue be not fast enough start up exiting from LPM3, 4 modes? 
     
    thanks.
  12. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    hi Adrian,
     
    Really enjoyed your great project, congratulations!   I'm trying to do my homework porting it to 5529 LP (as original LP uart in linux is a pain and my setup is a rpi running 24x7 sharing AIS data ).
     
    Got all hw right initialized (I think) and it outputs some info at UART but then stops in 1-2 minutes (red led stops blinking) ... hw is ok as it works fine with original LP.
     
    dAISy 0.2 started y
  13. Like
    gmtii reacted to chicken in Wired USB DP/DM Backwards, Killed USB?   
    You mean like this?

     
    As it took me over an hour of fiddling to cross the wires and I was out of town for a week anyways, I decided to respin the board just to fix the first bug. On the upside, installing the pull-up resistors on the new revision only took 5 minutes.
  14. Like
    gmtii reacted to chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    dAISy USB is alive!
     
    Before reflow - can you spot the DOH! moment I had shortly after reflow?

     
    And flashing LED after programming via F5529 LaunchPad

     
    Pretty jazzed that it worked at first try!
    Next up, migrating the dAISy project to the MSP430F5508. Already have it working on the MSP430F5529.
  15. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from energia in [Energia Library] ILI9341 TFT 2.2 port   
    hi,
     
    I've ported the Seeed library for cheap ebay 2.2 inch ILI9341 displays (only tested on Stellaris),
     
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1PC-2-2-Inch-SPI-TFT-LCD-Serial-Port-Module-Display-ILI9341-5V-3-3V-New-/200948143239?pt=Cake_Decorating_Supplies&hash=item2ec9715487
     
    https://github.com/gmtii/ILI9341_energia
     
     
    Saludos!


  16. Like
    gmtii reacted to yosh in PCB Give Away   
    Thanks for the info, good to hear you got them. Just let me know if you could tinker something nice with them
     
    Next step for me is to make the next revision - this time I'm planning to make a MCU board for F5529 and G2553. I'm trying to squeeze the TSSOP20 footprint of the G2553 inside the QFP80 footprint of the F5529. But I guess I need to improve my PCB designing skills for this project   ... but anyway, it will be fun.
     
    Best wishes!
  17. Like
    gmtii reacted to yosh in PCB Give Away   
    @@reaper7 Good to hear :-)
     
    I use these boards for almost every project, e.g. some minutes ago I made a simple thermocouple board (see image). So in this case I used the MCU board with the OLED attached, a proto board for the MAX31855 IC and a protoboard for a LiPo Accu for regulated 3.3V output (which I made some weeks ago).
    So you could re-use the MCU board for many projects and only have to assemble the proto board for the special purpose.
     
    Attached you will find an image of the MCU board - it shows which components (resistor, caps, ...) I normally use. I can also send you the fritzing design files if you need them...

     
    Kind regards
    yosh
  18. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from Rei Vilo in [Energia Library] ILI9341 TFT 2.2 port   
    hi,
     
    I've ported the Seeed library for cheap ebay 2.2 inch ILI9341 displays (only tested on Stellaris),
     
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1PC-2-2-Inch-SPI-TFT-LCD-Serial-Port-Module-Display-ILI9341-5V-3-3V-New-/200948143239?pt=Cake_Decorating_Supplies&hash=item2ec9715487
     
    https://github.com/gmtii/ILI9341_energia
     
     
    Saludos!


  19. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from yosh in PCB Give Away   
    received in good shape! thank you!
     
    Enviado desde mi GT-P6810 mediante Tapatalk
     
     
  20. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from mega_john in [Energia Library] ILI9341 TFT 2.2 port   
    hi,
     
    I've ported the Seeed library for cheap ebay 2.2 inch ILI9341 displays (only tested on Stellaris),
     
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1PC-2-2-Inch-SPI-TFT-LCD-Serial-Port-Module-Display-ILI9341-5V-3-3V-New-/200948143239?pt=Cake_Decorating_Supplies&hash=item2ec9715487
     
    https://github.com/gmtii/ILI9341_energia
     
     
    Saludos!


  21. Like
    gmtii reacted to chicken in [POTM] dAISy - A Simple AIS Receiver   
    Overview
    dAISy (do AIS yourself) is a very simple AIS receiver that I developed from scratch. It is built around the Silicon Labs EZRadioPRO Si4362 receiver, using a Texas Instruments MSP430G2553 MCU for processing and the MSP-EXP430G2 v1.5 LaunchPad as development platform.

    The complete project source code and schematics are available on GitHub: https://github.com/astuder/dAISy

    Update 5/18/2015: A finished, self-contained AIS receiver based on this project is now available for purchase in my web store.
     
    AIS, short for Automatic Identification System, is a standard for tracking ships. Ships advertise their position, course and other information with short transmissions on specific frequencies (161.975 MHz and 162.025 MHz). More on Wikipedia.
     
    An AIS receiver, like dAISy, receives and decodes AIS transmissions. It then re-packages the raw data into NMEA sentences (specifically formatted ASCII strings). Finally, using a serial connection, these strings are forwarded to more capable equipment for further processing.
     

     
    If you're the lucky owner of a tricked out boat, you could connect dAISy to your navigation computer. For land lobbers like me, a more common use case is to run naval mapping software that supports AIS data input on a PC. In the screenshot below I've connected dAISy to OpenCPN (link), an open source chart plotter and navigation software.
     

     
    On the top right you can see my setup war-driving at the Seattle waterfront as my lab is too far from the coast to receive anything. The LaunchPad sits on the dashboard with a white USB cable connecting to the notebook computer in the foreground.
     
    dAISy's data is fed into OpenCPN, bottom right shows a log of the serial data received. OpenCPN maintains a database of all the collected data (lower left) and visualizes nearby ships on a map (top center), including past and projected course. Hovering the mouse over a ship will display its name (text on yellow ground) and clicking it will reveal more detail (top left).
     
    Hardware
    I wanted to build my own, non-SDR, AIS receiver for a long time. There are a few projects floating around the internet (e.g. here) which refer back to an article by Peter Baston, published 2008 in Circuit Cellar magazine (copy available here gone.. google for Peter Baston Circuit Cellar to find other copies). Unfortunately, the CMX family of modem ICs by CMS Microcircuits (link) used in these projects are relatively expensive ($15+) and hard to find for hobbyists. In addition you'd need a radio to do tune into and down-convert from the ~162 MHz carrier frequency.
     
    So I was quite excited when earlier this year a parametric search on Mouser brought up a new IC  that covered the required range (162 MHz) and modulation (GMSK). And best of all, available in single quantities for $3.56 $2.27 $2.22! (link)
     
    The Silicon Labs EzRadioPRO Si4362 (link) is a single chip receiver that covers frequencies from 142 to 1050 MHz and supports various modulations, including GMSK. It comes in a tiny 20-pin QFN package and the only external parts required are a 30 MHz crystal, an antenna with a few capacitors and inductors for impedance matching, and finally some decoupling caps and pull-down resistors.
     
    Time to whip up a breakout board. I used the opportunity to give KiCad a try and quite like it.
     
    Here's the schematic:

     
    And the layout:

     
    I used OSHPark to make the PCBs. At a smidgen over one square inch it cost  $5.15 for 3 copies:

    http://oshpark.com/shared_projects/QUWi71r4
     
    Note that the layout still has three issues that I already fixed in the schematic:
    GPIO0 and GPIO1 were flipped SDO required a pull-down resistor as the radio leaves it floating when not actively sending, which confused the hell out of me while trying to figure out the communication protocol. Lastly, the holes for the headers turned out to be slightly too small to comfortably fit the cheap breakout headers I had at hand. Edit: Here's Rev B where I fixed these issues: http://oshpark.com/shared_projects/WI6u3Qmk
     
    Which brings us to the BOM:
    Silicon Labs Si4362 (U1) 30 MHz crystal (X1) Si4362 datasheet specifies <11 pF load capacitance, but a crystal specified for 12pF load capacitance seems to work fine too Antenna/LNA matching network, calculated based on SiLabs AN643 (link, approx. values, +/- 5% shouldn't matter too much): 75 ohm (dipole): 10 pF (CR1), 5 pF (CR2), 280 nH (LR1), 200 nH (LR2) 50 ohm: 12 pF (CR1), 6 pF (CR2), 240 nH (LR1), 160 nH (LR2) Decoupling caps: 100 pF, 100 nF, 1uF (C1, C2, C3) Pull-down resistors 100 k (R1, R2) First thing I noticed when I received the parts: The 20-pin QFN at 4x4 millimeters is tiny!

     
    I mounted it by first tinning the pads with a small quantity of solder. I then added flux and placed the chip on the pad. I then used a hot air station to carefully reflow the solder. Worked the first time around.

    After using jumper wires to figure out how to talk to the chip, I mounted the breakout board on a makeshift BoosterPack using perfboard, double-sided tape and wire (see picture at the top of the post).



    Here's how I ended up connecting the breakout board to the LaunchPad / MSP430G2553:
    SEL -> P1.4 (SPI chip select) SCLK -> P1.5 (SPI CLK) SDO -> P1.6 (SPI MISO) SDI -> P1.7 (SPI MOSI) GPIO0 -> P2.0 (I/O unused) GPIO1 -> P2.1 (I/O clear-to-send) GPIO2 -> P2.2 (I/O RX clock) GPIO3 -> P2.3 (I/O RX data) SDN -> P2.4 (shutdown / reset) IRQ -> P2.5 (I/O channel-clear) Software
    The software of dAISy consists of three major blocks:
    Radio configuration and control over SPI Packet handler, including a basic FIFO for received messages NMEA encoding and transmission to the PC over UART For UART (TX only) and SPI (TX/RX) I use the MSP430G2553's USCI A0 and B0 respectively. In both cases I don't use interrupts which simplifies things considerably.
     
    Upon reset the following steps happen:
    Initialize MSP430 peripherals Initialize packet handler, which will also reset FIFO Initialize and configure of radio, which will also setup SPI Start packet handler, which will also put the radio into receive mode And in the main loop:
    If debug messages are enabled, poll packet handler for status and errors and report them over UART Check FIFO for new packets If there is a new packet, invoke NMEA processing (which sends the message over serial to the PC) and remove packet from FIFO Below follows a more detailed discussion of the radio integration and the implementation of the packet handler.
     
    Radio
    The communication with the radio is vanilla SPI using 4 wires: MOSI (SDI), MISO (SDO), CLK (SCLK) and CS (SEL). I used the MSP430's USCI B0 to implement SPI and a separate pin to control CS.
     
    The only tricky thing to figure out was, that the Si4362 keeps the MISO line floating unless it actively transmits data. This is unfortunate as the master is supposed to poll for a specific response (FF) to detect when the radio is ready to receive more commands. This is easily fixed by adding a weak pull down resistor to SDO. I did this on the board, but it probably also works with using MSP430's internal pull-down.
     
    Additional lines I used to control the radio are:
    SDN to reset the radio CTS, which by default is mapped to the radio's GPIO1, indicating that the radio is ready for the next command While taking up an extra pin, CTS turned out to be much more convenient than the SPI response code to properly time communication flow with the radio. In dAISy, I wait for CTS to go high after each command to ensure the radio completed its task.
     
    The communication protocol is quite extensive but well documented:
    EZRadioPRO API Documentation describes the complete API and all registers AN633 Programming Guide for EZRadioPro Si4x6x Devices describes how to use the API in common scenarios Both are available on the Si4362 product page (link), under Documentation > Application Notes and are still updated quite frequently.
     
    The radio is set up by dumping a large configuration sequence into it. This includes configuration of radio frequency, modulation, GPIO pins and more. This information is stored in radio_config.h, which has to be generated with a tool called WDS (Wireless Development Suite). WDS is available in the Tools section on the Si4362 product site.
     

     
    Above are the settings I used for dAISy. WDS will use this information to configure various amplifiers, filters, clocks and decoding algorithms inside the chip. As Si4362 supports GMSK encoding only indirectly (see this thread), I'm certain there's more optimization potential by tweaking registers, but that's currently way beyond my knowledge of RF theory.
     
    While the Si4362 comes with its own packet handler, it unfortunately does not support NRZI encoding (Wikipedia). So I set up the radio to expose the 9600 baud clock and received data on separate pins and implemented my own packet handler.
     
    Packet Handler
    The packet handler (inspired by Peter Baston's implementation) is implemented as a state machine that is invoked on each rising edge of pin P2.2 which receives the data clock.
     

    There are 5 main states:
    Off, no processing of incoming data Reset, start from anew, either on start up or after successful/failed processing of a packet Wait for Sync, waiting for a training sequence to arrive (010101..) and start flag (01111110), implemented with its own state machine   Reset, start new preamble 0, last bit was a zero 1, last bit was a one flag, training sequence complete, now process start flag Prefetch, ingest the next 8 message bits to ease further processing Receive Packet, process bits until the end flag (01111110) is found or an error situation occurs Independent of state, the interrupt routine continually decodes NRZI into actual bit sequence.
     
    In the "Receive Packet" state there's continuous calculation of the packet CRC and some bit-de-stuffing. When the end flag is found and the CRC is correct, the received message is committed into the FIFO. If an error is encountered, the bytes already written to the FIFO are discarded. In both cases, the state machine starts anew by transitioning into RESET.
    This reads like a lot of code for an interrupt handler. However with the MCU running at 16MHz even the most complex state only uses a fraction (<10%) of the available time.
     
    Future Improvements
    Lastly a list of things I'd like to improve with the next version of dAISy.
     
    Software:
    Receiving on both AIS channels through channel-hopping done 1/5/2014 Tweak radio settings for better sensitivity and lower error rate LED(s) for indicating reception of valid/corrupt packets Hardware:
    Proper antenna connector Layout PCB as BoosterPack and/or USB dongle Receiving on both AIS channels at once with two radio ICs -- edit 12/25: replaced original post with high-level project description, more detailed documentation of implementation to come
    -- edit 12/28: added documentation for hardware (here and on Github), fixed some typos
    -- edit 12/31: added documentation for software and list of future improvements
    -- edit 01/05: implemented channel hopping (change to state machine)
    -- edit 01/15: changed state machine to reflect recent changes (see post further down for details), added link to shared project on OSHPark
    -- edit 01/25: major rework of sync detection state machine

  22. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from Rickta59 in [Energia Library] ILI9341 TFT 2.2 port   
    hi,
     
    I've ported the Seeed library for cheap ebay 2.2 inch ILI9341 displays (only tested on Stellaris),
     
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1PC-2-2-Inch-SPI-TFT-LCD-Serial-Port-Module-Display-ILI9341-5V-3-3V-New-/200948143239?pt=Cake_Decorating_Supplies&hash=item2ec9715487
     
    https://github.com/gmtii/ILI9341_energia
     
     
    Saludos!


  23. Like
    gmtii got a reaction from rado_1 in 2.2 inch LCD TFT ILI9341 Library?!   
    There is a library working on Stellaris already. It can be a better start point:
     
    https://github.com/gmtii/ILI9341_energia
     
    Enviado desde mi GT-P6810 mediante Tapatalk
     
     
  24. Like
    gmtii reacted to Bingo600 in Free Book - Discovering.the.STM32.Microcontroller   
    Just saw this free book from Geoffrey Brown , a guy i have had some dialouge with, after i did the Versaloon port to the STM32-VL-Discovery board.
     
    Looks like he did a nice work here
     
    Discovering.the.STM32.Microcontroller-book
     
    Book Url
    ------------------
    www.cs.indiana.edu/~geobrown/book.pdf
     
     
     
    http://homes.soic.indiana.edu/geobrown/index.cgi/publications%C2'>
     
     
    /Bingo
  25. Like
    gmtii reacted to rockets4kids in How the heck I should start using CSS?   
    Those who are having difficulties learning the CCS user interface should look for tutorials on Eclipse, the Open Source IDE from which CCS is derived.
     
    Personally, I am not a fan of IDEs with a WIMP interface (Emacs is *my* IDE) so I do not know how close CCS remains to Eclipse, but I have been told that CCS 5 is *much* closer to the stock Eclipse than CCS 4.
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