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rockets4kids

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  1. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from jsolarski in Need Cooking Help !   
    Assuming this is not a troll....
     
    The best source for "American" cooking is "The Joy of Cooking." There are a number of versions (1931, 1964, 1975, 1997, 2006) that reflect popular American cooking at the time of publication. You are *probably* going to want the 1964 edition which embodies 1950s palette.
  2. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from EngIP in What's the big idea with Linux?   
    There is an old saying: "Those who don't understand UNIX are condemned to reinvent it, poorly."
     
    If you want to know "why unix?" there is one book you *must* read: _The Design of the UNIX Operating System_ by Maurice J. Bach
     
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/0132017997
     
    The wonderful thing about Unix is that a fully functional (if not necessarily useable) system can be implemented in roughly 10,000 lines of code. The best example here is Minix, described in _Operating Systems: Design and Implementation_ by Andrew S. Tanenbaum
     
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/0131429388
     
    Linux evolved as a result of Linus Torvalds' desire to re-work the original Minix (version 1) from an educational tool into a usable system.
     
    The current version of Minix (Minix 3) splits the difference between an educational tool and something usable, resulting in n increase in kernel size from 10,000 lines of code to roughly 30,000 lines of code.
  3. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from zeke in Factory DCO calibration, how accurate?   
    It is really a shame that TI did not break out the 12 Mhz clock from the FET side over to the target chip, as this would allow for much better user-calibration of the target chip's DCO than than the 32.786 kHz crystal, assuming that you are even able to get it soldered in place properly.
  4. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from juani_c in how to optimize code?   
    In an equation like this, the time-killer is the division. One divide will take far more cycles than all the rest combined, no matter how well optimized. If you are diving by a constant, look into a "fast divide" routine.
     
    Here is an example:
     
    http://www.hackersdelight.org/divcMore.pdf
  5. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from gatesphere in how to optimize code?   
    In an equation like this, the time-killer is the division. One divide will take far more cycles than all the rest combined, no matter how well optimized. If you are diving by a constant, look into a "fast divide" routine.
     
    Here is an example:
     
    http://www.hackersdelight.org/divcMore.pdf
  6. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from zborgerd in MSP430 LaunchPad Book?   
    A definite second (or third or fourth) For the Davies book, but you are not sure about dropping the $40, be sure to watch the Launchpad Videos and then read through this tutorial:
     
    http://www.glitovsky.com/Tutorialv0_3.pdf
     
    That, combined with resources on the net, might just be enough to get you going.
  7. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from C_Coffie in MSP430 LaunchPad Book?   
    A definite second (or third or fourth) For the Davies book, but you are not sure about dropping the $40, be sure to watch the Launchpad Videos and then read through this tutorial:
     
    http://www.glitovsky.com/Tutorialv0_3.pdf
     
    That, combined with resources on the net, might just be enough to get you going.
  8. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from Rickta59 in MSPGCC support for newer Value Line parts?   
    There is a new development tree of mspgcc known as "Uniarch" whose goal is to reduce the effort required to add support for new chips. Apparently, adding support for new chips was a lot of work in current/previous versions. In any case, the first alpha release of Uniarch came out several weeks ago, and support for the complete set of Value Line chips was added earlier this week.
     
    There are no packages available, and you are going to need to pull the sources from git and compile it on your own, but fortunately it compiles quite easily under Linux and OS/X. I have not yet heard any reports one way or another from anyone who has attempted to compile it under mingw or cygwin.
     
    If you go this route, be aware that you are also going to need to pull the latest mspdebug sources from the git repository in order to program the new chips, and the gdb included with Uniarch is known to be broken. You should be able to use your existing gdb binary with the new toolchain.
     
    For details, check the past month's archives on mspgcc-users.
  9. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from bluehash in MSPGCC support for newer Value Line parts?   
    There is a new development tree of mspgcc known as "Uniarch" whose goal is to reduce the effort required to add support for new chips. Apparently, adding support for new chips was a lot of work in current/previous versions. In any case, the first alpha release of Uniarch came out several weeks ago, and support for the complete set of Value Line chips was added earlier this week.
     
    There are no packages available, and you are going to need to pull the sources from git and compile it on your own, but fortunately it compiles quite easily under Linux and OS/X. I have not yet heard any reports one way or another from anyone who has attempted to compile it under mingw or cygwin.
     
    If you go this route, be aware that you are also going to need to pull the latest mspdebug sources from the git repository in order to program the new chips, and the gdb included with Uniarch is known to be broken. You should be able to use your existing gdb binary with the new toolchain.
     
    For details, check the past month's archives on mspgcc-users.
  10. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from jsolarski in MSPGCC support for newer Value Line parts?   
    There is a new development tree of mspgcc known as "Uniarch" whose goal is to reduce the effort required to add support for new chips. Apparently, adding support for new chips was a lot of work in current/previous versions. In any case, the first alpha release of Uniarch came out several weeks ago, and support for the complete set of Value Line chips was added earlier this week.
     
    There are no packages available, and you are going to need to pull the sources from git and compile it on your own, but fortunately it compiles quite easily under Linux and OS/X. I have not yet heard any reports one way or another from anyone who has attempted to compile it under mingw or cygwin.
     
    If you go this route, be aware that you are also going to need to pull the latest mspdebug sources from the git repository in order to program the new chips, and the gdb included with Uniarch is known to be broken. You should be able to use your existing gdb binary with the new toolchain.
     
    For details, check the past month's archives on mspgcc-users.
  11. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from dangpzanco in Generating random numbers.   
    Another option I have used in the past where speed and small code size trump all else is a Linear Feedback Shift Register. This is something I learned from Don Lancaster back in the Apple 2 days. His particular recipe can be found here:
     
    http://www.tinaja.com/glib/atg1.pdf
     
    on page 1.1
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