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rockets4kids

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  1. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from Jacob in [Mac OS X] Sublime Text 2 + SublimeGDB for MSP430 ?   
    I don't know about Sublime Text, but in Emacs all you need to do is specify the location of the msp430-gdb binary.
  2. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from oPossum in MSP430 wiring when standing alone   
    While a MSP430 may appear to run without decoupling caps in some circumstances it is going to be prone to erratic behavior.  Not using decoupling caps is a fools errand, guaranteed to cause you much grief down the road.
  3. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from abecedarian in Borrowing Tools   
    I see a number of difficult issues here:
     
    - How do you provide proper training on the tools for the safety of the tool and the user?
     
    - How do you deal with the liability issues of a user breaking a tool, or a possibly damaged tool injuring its user?
  4. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from tingo in Borrowing Tools   
    I see a number of difficult issues here:
     
    - How do you provide proper training on the tools for the safety of the tool and the user?
     
    - How do you deal with the liability issues of a user breaking a tool, or a possibly damaged tool injuring its user?
  5. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from GeekDoc in Borrowing Tools   
    I see a number of difficult issues here:
     
    - How do you provide proper training on the tools for the safety of the tool and the user?
     
    - How do you deal with the liability issues of a user breaking a tool, or a possibly damaged tool injuring its user?
  6. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from GeekDoc in Has TI 's samples policy changed ?   
    TI reduced quantity limits from five to two last year and and blacklisted public email domains (gmail, yahoo, etc) earlier this year.  I have only placed one sample order this year, but I am not aware of any further restrictions.
     
    The number of people abusing the samples programs have been getting out of hand in recent years and all manufacturers have been forced to get more strict with their samples program.
  7. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from gsutton in Has TI 's samples policy changed ?   
    TI reduced quantity limits from five to two last year and and blacklisted public email domains (gmail, yahoo, etc) earlier this year.  I have only placed one sample order this year, but I am not aware of any further restrictions.
     
    The number of people abusing the samples programs have been getting out of hand in recent years and all manufacturers have been forced to get more strict with their samples program.
  8. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from bluehash in Low power audio for kid's toy   
    The "jellybean" amp/speaker driver is the LM386.  This chip is perfect paired to your generic 3" 8 ohm speaker.  You should be able to find plenty of information on the web about how to drive it.
     
    If you need a little more volume, there are a huge number of options.  Unfortunately, I don't have any specific recommendations here.
     
    I have been scrapping old CRT TVs for parts, and this is a great source for audio amplifiers and speakers.  Almost invariably the amplifier chip is a TDAxxxx part and a datasheet can easily be found with a web search.  
  9. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from Fred in Low power audio for kid's toy   
    The "jellybean" amp/speaker driver is the LM386.  This chip is perfect paired to your generic 3" 8 ohm speaker.  You should be able to find plenty of information on the web about how to drive it.
     
    If you need a little more volume, there are a huge number of options.  Unfortunately, I don't have any specific recommendations here.
     
    I have been scrapping old CRT TVs for parts, and this is a great source for audio amplifiers and speakers.  Almost invariably the amplifier chip is a TDAxxxx part and a datasheet can easily be found with a web search.  
  10. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from gsutton in ultra low power mcu, is it a narrow segment?   
    You can't really compare the M4 with the MSP430, and even the M3s are a stretch.  The M0 is actually a good comparison with the MSP430, and on the contrary, they tend to have as much or more flash/ram than the msp430.
     
    Spec wise, the LPC1114 blows the 2553 out of the water at half the price.  Sadly, there is little documentation available outside of the data sheet, very little sample code, and almost no community support.
     
    TI would be in some real trouble if anyone addressed those issues...
  11. Like
    rockets4kids reacted to oPossum in Problem combining ADC10 and USCI on G2553   
    in main() remove this line: IE2 |= (UCA0RXIE | UCA0TXIE);  // Enable RX and TX interrupts
     
     
    #pragma vector=USCIAB0TX_VECTOR
    __interrupt void usciab0tx_isr (void)
    {
        if(serial_bp && *serial_bp) {
            UCA0TXBUF = *serial_bp++;
        } else {
            IE2 &= ~UCA0TXIE;
        }
    }
     
    void serial_out (char *p)
    {
    while(IE2 & UCA0TXIE);
        serial_bp = p;              // set global pointer
        IE2 |= UCA0TXIE;            // start things going!
    }

     
  12. Like
    rockets4kids reacted to oPossum in Problem combining ADC10 and USCI on G2553   
    The UART tx interrupt flag will be set whenever the tx buffer can accept a char. So if you are not feeding chars to the UART, then it may get stuck in the ISR.
     
    Turn on the tx interrupt enable when you have char(s) to send, turn it back off when there are no more to send.
  13. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from RobG in Does CCS support binary number representations in source?   
    In that case, the following may be helpful to CCS users:
     
    http://cprog.tomsweb.net/binconst.txt
  14. Like
    rockets4kids reacted to jpnorair in Does CCS support binary number representations in source?   
    Last I checked, it did not.
  15. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from pimmel in A few notes about TI's command line compilers   
    I have have finally gotten around to putting together an updated makefile that will build for both gcc and ccs/cl430
     
    The root Makefile is kept simple like this:
    PROG = blink CHIP = msp430g2553 COPTS = -O2 -Wall -g include default.mk And all the complicated bits are in defaut.mk:
     
    The options for CCS are essentially those generated with the "Debug" option.  I am not entirely sure these are optimal, but they seem to work.
     
    The makefile essentially invokes itself under Wine to build using TI's ccs/cl430 copiler.
     
    This still needs to be cleaned up, but it works.
    ### ### Generic makefile for MSP430 (gcc + cl430) ### # make sure a PROG is specified ifndef PROG $(error No PROG specified.) endif # make sure a chip is specified ifndef CHIP $(error No CHIP specified.) endif # make uppercase and lowercase versions of chip # (these get passed in when called via WINE) ifndef MCU_LC MCU_LC := $(shell echo $(CHIP) | tr A-Z a-z) endif ifndef MCU_UC MCU_UC := $(shell echo $(CHIP) | tr a-z A-Z) endif # output dir config O_GCC = gcc O_CCS = ccs # gcc config CC = msp430-gcc CXX = msp430-g++ OBJDUMP = msp430-objdump SIZE = msp430-size CFLAGS = $(COPTS) -mmcu=$(MCU_LC) # mspdebug config MSPDEBUG = mspdebug FET = rf2500 GDB = msp430-gdb GDBTUI = $(GDB)tui # ccs via wine config WINE = wine GMAKE = /Users/peter/.wine/drive_c/ti/utils/bin/gmake.exe CL430 = "C:/ti/compiler/bin/cl430" CL430_OPTS = -vmsp --abi=eabi -g --define=__$(MCU_UC)__ \ --display_error_number --diag_wrap=off \ --diag_warning=225 --diag_suppress=10374 \ --printf_support=minimal CL430_COPTS = --include_path="C:/ti/include" --include_path="C:/ti/compiler/include" CL430_LOPTS = -z --stack_size=80 --heap_size=80 \ -i"C:/ti/include" -i"C:/ti/compiler/lib" -i"C:/ti/compiler/include" \ --reread_libs --warn_sections --rom_model CL430_LNK = "C:/ti/include/lnk_$(MCU_LC).cmd" # gcc target files GCC_OBJS=$(O_GCC)/$(PROG).o GCC_ELF=$(O_GCC)/$(PROG).elf GCC_LST=$(O_GCC)/$(PROG).lst # ccs target files CCS_OBJS=$(O_CCS)/$(PROG).obj CCS_OUT=$(O_CCS)/$(PROG).out # specify non-file targets .PHONY: all gcc ccs lst clean install mspdebug debug gdb tui # what to make by default all: gcc ccs # make using "gcc" - make elf and display size gcc: $(GCC_ELF) $(SIZE) $(GCC_ELF) # make using "ccs" # - make sure dir exists and call gnu-make with wine # doze can't 'tr' so pass MCU vars in ccs: mkdir -p $(O_CCS) $(WINE) $(GMAKE) $(CCS_OUT) MCU_UC=$(MCU_UC) MCU_LC=$(MCU_LC) # # begin gcc-specific block # lst: $(GCC_LST) $(GCC_ELF): $(GCC_OBJS) $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -o $(GCC_ELF) $(GCC_OBJS) $(O_GCC)/%.o: %.c @mkdir -p $(@D) $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -c $< -o $@ $(GCC_LST): $(GCC_ELF) $(OBJDUMP) -DS $< >$@ clean: rm -fr $(O_GCC) $(O_CCS) install: $(GCC_ELF) $(MSPDEBUG) $(FET) "prog $(GCC_ELF)" mspdebug: $(GCC_ELF) $(MSPDEBUG) $(FET) debug: $(GCC_ELF) $(MSPDEBUG) $(FET) gdb gdb: $(GCC_ELF) $(GDB) $(GCC_ELF) tui: $(GCC_ELF) $(GDBTUI) $(GCC_ELF) # # begin CCS-specific block # $(CCS_OUT): $(CCS_OBJS) $(CL430) $(CL430_OPTS) $(CL430_LOPTS) -m$(O_CCS)/$(PROG).map -o $(CCS_OUT) \ $(CCS_OBJS) -l"libc.a" $(CL430_LNK) $(O_CCS)/%.obj: %.c $(CL430) $(CL430_OPTS) $(CL430_COPTS) --obj_directory $(O_CCS) $< install-ccs: $(CCS_OUT) $(MSPDEBUG) $(FET) "prog $(CCS_OUT)"
  16. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from pabigot in A few notes about TI's command line compilers   
    It appears as if the environment variable MSP430_C_DIR allows you to specify a default location of include and library files.
  17. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from jpnorair in A few notes about TI's command line compilers   
    For those unaware, CCS calls command line programs for all phases of compilation and linking.  Back in the days of CCS V4 I attempted to use these directly without any luck.  Shortly thereafter I discovered mspgcc and largely ignored CCS.  However, I have long wanted to be able to use these CLI tools so I can verify that my code is indeed cross-platform while developing.
     
    I recently had another go, this time with much more success.  Not only did I succeed in getting the tools working from the command line, but I was able to get them working via Wine under OS/X.  Now I will be able to do all of my CCS verification directly under OS/X without having to run a virtual machine.
     
    All you need are the following three directories from your CCSv5 install.  You can just copy the files, there do not appear to be any registry hoops to jump through, and it seems as if the files cal live anywhere with the proper edits to your makefiles.
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\tools\compiler\msp430_4.1.5 - the compiler itself
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\ccs_base\msp430\include - chip-specific includes and linker scripts
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\utils\bin - gmake.exe if you want to use the makefiles created by CCS
     
    I am still working on understanding what the CCS-generated makefiles do and rolling that into my own.  If anyone is interested I'll post a follow-up.
     
    Theoretically this could also be used to run TI's compilers under a native eclipse install under OSX, but I have no intention of even attempting this.  Perhaps the only other useful application of this would be to use TI's compilers on extremely resource-limited machines.  The full compiler+includes is only about 200 megs and seems to require very little RAM at runtime.
     
     
  18. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from GeekDoc in Pot Tutorial   
    Assuming you want to do this with a microcontroller, you can configure the pot as a voltage divider and read that voltage with the ADC.  You can then use this value to drive the PWM code.
  19. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from tripwire in A few notes about TI's command line compilers   
    For those unaware, CCS calls command line programs for all phases of compilation and linking.  Back in the days of CCS V4 I attempted to use these directly without any luck.  Shortly thereafter I discovered mspgcc and largely ignored CCS.  However, I have long wanted to be able to use these CLI tools so I can verify that my code is indeed cross-platform while developing.
     
    I recently had another go, this time with much more success.  Not only did I succeed in getting the tools working from the command line, but I was able to get them working via Wine under OS/X.  Now I will be able to do all of my CCS verification directly under OS/X without having to run a virtual machine.
     
    All you need are the following three directories from your CCSv5 install.  You can just copy the files, there do not appear to be any registry hoops to jump through, and it seems as if the files cal live anywhere with the proper edits to your makefiles.
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\tools\compiler\msp430_4.1.5 - the compiler itself
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\ccs_base\msp430\include - chip-specific includes and linker scripts
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\utils\bin - gmake.exe if you want to use the makefiles created by CCS
     
    I am still working on understanding what the CCS-generated makefiles do and rolling that into my own.  If anyone is interested I'll post a follow-up.
     
    Theoretically this could also be used to run TI's compilers under a native eclipse install under OSX, but I have no intention of even attempting this.  Perhaps the only other useful application of this would be to use TI's compilers on extremely resource-limited machines.  The full compiler+includes is only about 200 megs and seems to require very little RAM at runtime.
     
     
  20. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from oPossum in A few notes about TI's command line compilers   
    For those unaware, CCS calls command line programs for all phases of compilation and linking.  Back in the days of CCS V4 I attempted to use these directly without any luck.  Shortly thereafter I discovered mspgcc and largely ignored CCS.  However, I have long wanted to be able to use these CLI tools so I can verify that my code is indeed cross-platform while developing.
     
    I recently had another go, this time with much more success.  Not only did I succeed in getting the tools working from the command line, but I was able to get them working via Wine under OS/X.  Now I will be able to do all of my CCS verification directly under OS/X without having to run a virtual machine.
     
    All you need are the following three directories from your CCSv5 install.  You can just copy the files, there do not appear to be any registry hoops to jump through, and it seems as if the files cal live anywhere with the proper edits to your makefiles.
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\tools\compiler\msp430_4.1.5 - the compiler itself
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\ccs_base\msp430\include - chip-specific includes and linker scripts
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\utils\bin - gmake.exe if you want to use the makefiles created by CCS
     
    I am still working on understanding what the CCS-generated makefiles do and rolling that into my own.  If anyone is interested I'll post a follow-up.
     
    Theoretically this could also be used to run TI's compilers under a native eclipse install under OSX, but I have no intention of even attempting this.  Perhaps the only other useful application of this would be to use TI's compilers on extremely resource-limited machines.  The full compiler+includes is only about 200 megs and seems to require very little RAM at runtime.
     
     
  21. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from yyrkoon in A few notes about TI's command line compilers   
    For those unaware, CCS calls command line programs for all phases of compilation and linking.  Back in the days of CCS V4 I attempted to use these directly without any luck.  Shortly thereafter I discovered mspgcc and largely ignored CCS.  However, I have long wanted to be able to use these CLI tools so I can verify that my code is indeed cross-platform while developing.
     
    I recently had another go, this time with much more success.  Not only did I succeed in getting the tools working from the command line, but I was able to get them working via Wine under OS/X.  Now I will be able to do all of my CCS verification directly under OS/X without having to run a virtual machine.
     
    All you need are the following three directories from your CCSv5 install.  You can just copy the files, there do not appear to be any registry hoops to jump through, and it seems as if the files cal live anywhere with the proper edits to your makefiles.
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\tools\compiler\msp430_4.1.5 - the compiler itself
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\ccs_base\msp430\include - chip-specific includes and linker scripts
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\utils\bin - gmake.exe if you want to use the makefiles created by CCS
     
    I am still working on understanding what the CCS-generated makefiles do and rolling that into my own.  If anyone is interested I'll post a follow-up.
     
    Theoretically this could also be used to run TI's compilers under a native eclipse install under OSX, but I have no intention of even attempting this.  Perhaps the only other useful application of this would be to use TI's compilers on extremely resource-limited machines.  The full compiler+includes is only about 200 megs and seems to require very little RAM at runtime.
     
     
  22. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from bluehash in A few notes about TI's command line compilers   
    For those unaware, CCS calls command line programs for all phases of compilation and linking.  Back in the days of CCS V4 I attempted to use these directly without any luck.  Shortly thereafter I discovered mspgcc and largely ignored CCS.  However, I have long wanted to be able to use these CLI tools so I can verify that my code is indeed cross-platform while developing.
     
    I recently had another go, this time with much more success.  Not only did I succeed in getting the tools working from the command line, but I was able to get them working via Wine under OS/X.  Now I will be able to do all of my CCS verification directly under OS/X without having to run a virtual machine.
     
    All you need are the following three directories from your CCSv5 install.  You can just copy the files, there do not appear to be any registry hoops to jump through, and it seems as if the files cal live anywhere with the proper edits to your makefiles.
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\tools\compiler\msp430_4.1.5 - the compiler itself
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\ccs_base\msp430\include - chip-specific includes and linker scripts
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\utils\bin - gmake.exe if you want to use the makefiles created by CCS
     
    I am still working on understanding what the CCS-generated makefiles do and rolling that into my own.  If anyone is interested I'll post a follow-up.
     
    Theoretically this could also be used to run TI's compilers under a native eclipse install under OSX, but I have no intention of even attempting this.  Perhaps the only other useful application of this would be to use TI's compilers on extremely resource-limited machines.  The full compiler+includes is only about 200 megs and seems to require very little RAM at runtime.
     
     
  23. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from RobG in A few notes about TI's command line compilers   
    For those unaware, CCS calls command line programs for all phases of compilation and linking.  Back in the days of CCS V4 I attempted to use these directly without any luck.  Shortly thereafter I discovered mspgcc and largely ignored CCS.  However, I have long wanted to be able to use these CLI tools so I can verify that my code is indeed cross-platform while developing.
     
    I recently had another go, this time with much more success.  Not only did I succeed in getting the tools working from the command line, but I was able to get them working via Wine under OS/X.  Now I will be able to do all of my CCS verification directly under OS/X without having to run a virtual machine.
     
    All you need are the following three directories from your CCSv5 install.  You can just copy the files, there do not appear to be any registry hoops to jump through, and it seems as if the files cal live anywhere with the proper edits to your makefiles.
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\tools\compiler\msp430_4.1.5 - the compiler itself
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\ccs_base\msp430\include - chip-specific includes and linker scripts
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\utils\bin - gmake.exe if you want to use the makefiles created by CCS
     
    I am still working on understanding what the CCS-generated makefiles do and rolling that into my own.  If anyone is interested I'll post a follow-up.
     
    Theoretically this could also be used to run TI's compilers under a native eclipse install under OSX, but I have no intention of even attempting this.  Perhaps the only other useful application of this would be to use TI's compilers on extremely resource-limited machines.  The full compiler+includes is only about 200 megs and seems to require very little RAM at runtime.
     
     
  24. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from xpg in A few notes about TI's command line compilers   
    For those unaware, CCS calls command line programs for all phases of compilation and linking.  Back in the days of CCS V4 I attempted to use these directly without any luck.  Shortly thereafter I discovered mspgcc and largely ignored CCS.  However, I have long wanted to be able to use these CLI tools so I can verify that my code is indeed cross-platform while developing.
     
    I recently had another go, this time with much more success.  Not only did I succeed in getting the tools working from the command line, but I was able to get them working via Wine under OS/X.  Now I will be able to do all of my CCS verification directly under OS/X without having to run a virtual machine.
     
    All you need are the following three directories from your CCSv5 install.  You can just copy the files, there do not appear to be any registry hoops to jump through, and it seems as if the files cal live anywhere with the proper edits to your makefiles.
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\tools\compiler\msp430_4.1.5 - the compiler itself
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\ccs_base\msp430\include - chip-specific includes and linker scripts
     
    C:\ti\ccsv5\utils\bin - gmake.exe if you want to use the makefiles created by CCS
     
    I am still working on understanding what the CCS-generated makefiles do and rolling that into my own.  If anyone is interested I'll post a follow-up.
     
    Theoretically this could also be used to run TI's compilers under a native eclipse install under OSX, but I have no intention of even attempting this.  Perhaps the only other useful application of this would be to use TI's compilers on extremely resource-limited machines.  The full compiler+includes is only about 200 megs and seems to require very little RAM at runtime.
     
     
  25. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from dangpzanco in tone generator on MSP430 g2553   
    Are you seriously so lazy that you are not even going to bother to edit the text of your classroom assignment before asking someone else to do it for you?
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