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rockets4kids

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  1. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from alchy75 in Programming/debugging MSP430(G2553) while not common ground   
    The target chip *must* share a ground with the tool you are flashing it with.
     
    Unrelated, but you need proper decoupling caps in addition to the pullup on reset if you want anything to work.
  2. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from abc in Embedded for a 10 year old?   
    Ditto on enl's comments.
     
    There is a reason the only people touting it are the people selling it.
  3. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from abecedarian in Embedded for a 10 year old?   
    Ditto on enl's comments.
     
    There is a reason the only people touting it are the people selling it.
  4. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from abc in Embedded for a 10 year old?   
    If you want to build a creature on the cheap, forget about the steppers and go with servos.  9 gram servos are three bucks a pop, they are dead simple to drive, provide absolute positioning, and only require one I/O pin each. 
  5. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from KatiePier in Making commercial electronics, self-financed - steps?   
    The first thing you are going to need to qualify is whether you are intenting to sell a component or a finished product.  If you are selling a component you (generally) do not need to worry about FCC approval.  If you are selling a product, you do.  This makes a world of difference in your overall costs.
  6. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from tripwire in DIY PCB Cutting Jig   
    Personally, I've never had any problems just using a straight edge.  Make the first cut light and then apply more pressure with each subsequent cut.  The blade will track the groove this way and after the first two scores you won't need the straight edge any more.
  7. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from spirilis in DIY PCB Cutting Jig   
    Personally, I've never had any problems just using a straight edge.  Make the first cut light and then apply more pressure with each subsequent cut.  The blade will track the groove this way and after the first two scores you won't need the straight edge any more.
  8. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from sol25 in MSP430G2553 on breadboard   
    http://forum.43oh.com/topic/799-using-the-launchpad-with-a-breadboard/
  9. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from dizzwold in Bread Board & wishful thinking   
    Something with good connections at a price that doesn't break the bank.
  10. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from abecedarian in Bread Board & wishful thinking   
    Something with good connections at a price that doesn't break the bank.
  11. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from abecedarian in How fast does this execute?   
    The *simplest* way to do this is to just put your scope on the output and measure the signals.
  12. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from roadrunner84 in Alternatives to MSP430FET   
    What you are describing is the LaunchPad.  All of the LaunchPads contain a proper programmer as well as a basic debugger and virtual serial port in a very small and cost-effective package.
  13. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from abecedarian in Oversampling, averaging and getting confused.   
    The first is a simple average and the second is a weighted average.  Which is preferred depends on what your goals are.
  14. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from spirilis in Job offers on 43oh   
    I'll point out that we're at 22 messages discussing two posts.
  15. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from bluehash in Making commercial electronics, self-financed - steps?   
    Here is a list of devices that are exempt:
     
    http://www.emcfastpass.com/could-your-product-be-exempt-from-emc-testing-altogether/
     
    This is a good introduction to designing for EMC compliance:
     
    http://www.emcfastpass.com/rightfirsttime/
     
    If your device is going to require compliance, the first thing you are going to need to do is read about what is involved in the process.
  16. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from abecedarian in Making commercial electronics, self-financed - steps?   
    The first thing you are going to need to qualify is whether you are intenting to sell a component or a finished product.  If you are selling a component you (generally) do not need to worry about FCC approval.  If you are selling a product, you do.  This makes a world of difference in your overall costs.
  17. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from abc in Making commercial electronics, self-financed - steps?   
    The first thing you are going to need to qualify is whether you are intenting to sell a component or a finished product.  If you are selling a component you (generally) do not need to worry about FCC approval.  If you are selling a product, you do.  This makes a world of difference in your overall costs.
  18. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from simpleavr in Servos and Eyeballs :)   
    I'll just leave this here:
     

  19. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from bluehash in Servos and Eyeballs :)   
    I'll just leave this here:
     

  20. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from GeekDoc in homemade trainer lab -and- MSP430 vs ATX question :)   
    If you don't add current limiting to a PC power supply you *will* regret it at the worst possible time.
     
    The simplest way to do this is to regulate the 5V rail down to your desired voltage with a linear regulator that does current limiting such as the LM1117.
  21. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from chicken in Code Composer Studio v6 now officially released   
    It has been a long time since I actually went to conferences, but I have noticed that in the videos I have watched of the presentations, almost all of the best presenters are using OS X.
     
    What is particularly difficult to understand is why TI would choose to support Linux and not OS X, since getting something running on Linux is 99% of the way towards getting something to run on OS X.
  22. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from JWoodrell in small solution for detecting 120V AC as a digital input   
    You might also want to check out this app note from Microchip on transformer-less power supplies:
     
    ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/.../00954A.pdf
     
    You could use one of these to drive an opto-isolator if you want a steady-state signal.
  23. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from bluehash in homemade trainer lab -and- MSP430 vs ATX question :)   
    If you don't add current limiting to a PC power supply you *will* regret it at the worst possible time.
     
    The simplest way to do this is to regulate the 5V rail down to your desired voltage with a linear regulator that does current limiting such as the LM1117.
  24. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from igor in Reversing the LED? i.e. sinking it to MCU?   
    In the olden days -- long, long ago -- the final drive circuitry for many logic parts could source more current than it could sink.  In most cases with modern parts this is no longer the case.
     
    You can always find specifications in the datasheet.  If you cannot find them, you are looking in the wrong datasheet.  Always be careful when only a single value is specified -- pay attention to what that number means!  In some cases, that is the limit to what the chip can take without damage.  In others, it is the limit to which it can maintain the proper output voltage levels.
     
    For some parts (such as the msp430) you will not find per-pin limits.  When this is as case, you will find a graph that shows the output voltage with respect to current.  Pay particular attention to how little current the msp430 parts can source/sink before the voltage levels change.  While the msp430 can only supply about 6 mA per pin and maintain proper logic level voltages (depending on operating voltage) it does seem as if it is safe to drive parts such as LEDs at higher currents when you aren't concerned about output voltage.  That is to say you won't damage your msp430 pin by driving an LED at 20 mA.  However, just because you can do this without damaging the pin doesn't mean you should design a circuit this way.
     
    Finally, be sure to pay attention to the *total* amount of current the chip can supply to all pins.  It is often *much* less than the total current per pin multiplied by the number of pins.
  25. Like
    rockets4kids got a reaction from greeeg in Reversing the LED? i.e. sinking it to MCU?   
    In the olden days -- long, long ago -- the final drive circuitry for many logic parts could source more current than it could sink.  In most cases with modern parts this is no longer the case.
     
    You can always find specifications in the datasheet.  If you cannot find them, you are looking in the wrong datasheet.  Always be careful when only a single value is specified -- pay attention to what that number means!  In some cases, that is the limit to what the chip can take without damage.  In others, it is the limit to which it can maintain the proper output voltage levels.
     
    For some parts (such as the msp430) you will not find per-pin limits.  When this is as case, you will find a graph that shows the output voltage with respect to current.  Pay particular attention to how little current the msp430 parts can source/sink before the voltage levels change.  While the msp430 can only supply about 6 mA per pin and maintain proper logic level voltages (depending on operating voltage) it does seem as if it is safe to drive parts such as LEDs at higher currents when you aren't concerned about output voltage.  That is to say you won't damage your msp430 pin by driving an LED at 20 mA.  However, just because you can do this without damaging the pin doesn't mean you should design a circuit this way.
     
    Finally, be sure to pay attention to the *total* amount of current the chip can supply to all pins.  It is often *much* less than the total current per pin multiplied by the number of pins.
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