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GeekDoc

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  1. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to PedroDaGr8 in Noritake Graphic VFD 128x32 Free Sample   
    OK, I received it today. The bad news is that they appear to be Atmel focused. Though as you will see later, not so much Arduino focused.

    The box includes:
    1x VFD 128x32 1u graphic VFD.
    1x simple wire harness connector (three wires for data and two for power and ground)
    1x strip of 6 Male-Male headers to connect to a breadboard/arduino/etc.
    1x spare male connector (but no pins )
    1x piece blue acrylic filter designed for VFD displays
    1x Quick setup pamphlet
    1x Informational sheet detailing the acrylic filters

    Now about the hardware. This thing is NICE! Puts any basic LCD I have played with to shame. It's very solidly built, feels very nice in the hand (not that this is important but still ), the soldering on it is clean. The device itself  is an integrated module which includes all the power circuitry and communications.  It can run off of just a 5V and ground. Plus, unlike many cheap ass LCD displays (which require D0-D7) this one only uses three digital lines.

    If you plan on using it with an Arduino, download both the Arduino library and the file labeled:
    "Arduino demo files from the video". The Arduino library appears to be generic for at least their GU-7000 series displays. There are a myriad of settings and which ones are important is not explained in the Quick Start pamphlet, let alone what they should be set to. To be honest the configuration section sucks. It tells you that an option should show up that they don't provide the files for. It's VERY VERY clear that this is their first Arduino rodeo. Most of the other stuff on their site is geared more towards AVR Studio, Atmel Studio or Linux. Basically, what I did was I imported the GU-7000 library (you won't get a GU-7003 option unlike what the pamphlet says). Then once that was imported, I used the demo files to play around.

    As for the included libraries, unlike most which perform the bare minimum; namely, make the display work. These actually provide a good amount of function. They are clearly designed with making interface displays in mind. They provide easy integated features such as creating selectable "windows" of space, highlighting/inverting, scrolling text and graphics, etc. These "windows" of space allow you to dynamically transform that section more easily, without bothering the other areas in the display. Also, on their site they provide tools for creating the image code from bitmaps, jpgs,etc. If you use Atmel or AVR they provide tools for generating entire interfaces.
  2. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to GastonP in TI Back to School Promotion   
    IMO, it's probably not all a matter of the watches being old stock, but of the experimental nature of them. I am having some trouble with mine too, but most of them I can assign to faulty firmware. The battery does not charge unless I reset the watch with the clip on, sometimes the response time to the middle button is not really great, and other small grievances, but I have been warned in advance and I was expecting to find that kind of issues so all well.
     
    My batteries don't seem to last more than two days and that could really be a problem of old stock, but I see it as nothing but the opportunity to pry the watch open . As I told you in another post, it's probable that the battery is not very complicated to get.
     
    The OLED displays... there is no reason to assume that they have "decayed" with time. They would have not as long life as a normal led or even LCDs, but that would be only with continuous operation. And also, this are not the OLEDs of 2005... (this are not the OLEDs you are looking for ) sorry, I couldn't resist the temptation. 
     
    To me, for 50 USD (plus 50% local taxes), it is worth the money. I really don't like the all digital smartwatches, and of course I wouldn't even dream of shelling out ~150 USD to buy one of them. And I like the looks of it
  3. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to GastonP in TI Back to School Promotion   
    Hey Doc, just in case you don't get an acceptable answer, and if you are bold enough, here is some other brave guy that did us the favor to show the innards of our new watches...
     
    http://sensorseverywhere.wordpress.com/2011/10/04/metawatch-platform-warranty-voided/
     
    The LiPo battery does not seem to be a too strange one so a substitution could be a piece of cake. Of lemon cake
  4. Like
    GeekDoc got a reaction from PenguinInfinity in TI Back to School Promotion   
    @@PenguinInfinity : This is definitely old stock; I believe the model is discontinued in favor of the full digital version(s).  It's actually pretty hard to find info/software/support on the analog+digital version.
     
    Let's hope all the batteries haven't gone bad!
  5. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to Fred in 10% off TI products at Farnell (UK and others) until 20 Sept 2013   
    As in the title. 10% in the UK and seems to be some other countries too (e.g. spotted 15% off in Germany).
    http://uk.farnell.com/texas-instruments?ICID=I-TEXASUK10
  6. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to Automate in New MSP430F5529 USB Launchpad Released   
    Comparison chart http://www.ti.com/paramsearch/docs/parametricsearch.tsp?family=wireless&familyId=935&sectionId=646&tabId=2736&uiTemplateId=WLS_PRDSRCH_T
  7. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to RobG in Geek Clock BoosterPack   
    @@GeekDoc, here are three simpe examples to get you started (the pattern in 2 LED version needs some work.)
    main-simple.c
    main-two.c
    main-three.c
  8. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to RobG in (Universal) Color LCD graphics library (2)   
    This is my new universal graphics library (original one is here.)
     
    Supported boards (this is out of the "box" support, but the library will work with any board after small changes.)
     
    TI's MSP430FR5969 LaunchPad (ugl16msp only for now)
    TI's MSP430F5529 LaunchPad
    TI's MSP430G2 LaunchPad with G2553 chip
    RobG's MSP430G2955 Dev Board
    RobG's MSP430F5172 Dev Board
    RobG's MSP430F5510 Dev Board
     
    Supported displays
     
    1.8" ST7735 based JD-T1800 - ugl8
    2.2" HX8340 based displays - ugl8
    2.2" ILI9225 based displays (touch panel) - ugl8
    2.2" ILI9341 based displays 320x240 pixels - ugl16
     
    Tiva versions are right here
     

     

     
     
    ugl8msp.zip (name change 4/18/14)
    ugl16msp.zip (updated 4/19/14)
  9. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to Rei Vilo in New MSP430F5529 USB Launchpad Released   
    So much has been already said...
     
    I tested the new LaunchPad with the BoosterPacks and libraries available for the former MSP430 LaunchPad and the Stellaris LaunchPad. 

    I only had to change the name of the pins. The library for RobG's 2.2 LCD screen worked on the first test.
     
     

     
    However, for some BoosterPacks, I faced compatibility issues. For example, the Educational BoosterPack requires an analog input in pin 5, available on the MSP430G2553 but not on the new MSP430F5529. Same for the Kentec 3.5" LCD BoosterPack.
     
    I'm adding the pins map for Energia and an updated release of embedXcode.
     

     
    embedXcode will support the new LaunchPad once Energia 10
  10. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to spirilis in New MSP430F5529 USB Launchpad Released   
    Alright so, I had to keep a zip on it til now but since it's released... I had early access to one of these (thanks to the TI folks!) and got to play with it a little ahead of time.  I'm going to dump my thoughts & observations:
     
    1. New eZFET is based on the MSP430.DLL V3 open-source FET library, same as what they use with the FET430UIF.  See http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/EZ-FET_lite
     
    You will need the MSP430.DLL (compilable on Windows and Linux; CCSv6 early adopter beta has a binary with full support for it, CCSv5 might not) to use it with "mspdebug" ... I think it's supposed to work on the Mac too but I tried compiling the MSP430.DLL crap months ago and gave up.  For now I compile on my Mac using mspgcc 4.7.0 and scp over to my Windows netbook where I run "mspdebug tilib" with CCSv6 beta's MSP430.DLL to program & debug it.
     
    2. The literature all mentions Energia, so I expect a full release of Energia is forthcoming soon.  Might be why they've been waiting so long to release an update.  I expect they will have got MSP430.DLL compilation on the Mac working for this release so I can quit worrying about copying the firmware & using my Windows machine ..... for everything including FET430UIF uses
     
    3. eZFET's backchannel UART has 2 new lines; CTS and RTS.  I think these are implemented in the serial link so your PC's terminal program can use them, but on the MSP430 hardware side they merely connect to 2 random lines on the F5529: CTS is a signal from PC-to-F5529 and goes to P1.7 so it's interrupt-capable, RTS is a signal from F5529-to-PC and is connected to P6.7.  The documentation for the FET expects you to use these lines for handshaking when you use UART speeds over 200Kbps I believe.
     
    4. I do love the new documentation sheet; it's colorful and way more explanatory than the others I've seen.  Rei Vilo's energia pinout diagrams inspired this BTW.
     
    5. Those stackable wire-wrap headers are a pain in the ass.  I couldn't get my Nokia 1202 boosterpack working with this (very flaky problems, including flickering in the backlight) until I bolstered the thickness of the pins with some flux+solder.  Stellaris & Tiva-C LP has the same problem though.
     
    6. There is a nasty glitch that TI should fix ASAP (and they do know about it), preferably with a back-fix for existing boards.  The TUSB hub chip holds the reigns on a couple power switch ICs that let 5V pass through to the eZFET and to the F5529's nets.  If there is no real PC on the other end of the USB connection, the TUSB chip never switches the power on.  So you HAVE to have this board plugged into a PC to power it up using the built-in USB port.  Maybe I'm overblowing this one but it's a basic feature we've been able to take for granted on pretty much every dev board on the market... in a pinch you can always plug your project into a USB cellphone charger or battery power brick, but not with this board.
     
    I suppose one could argue that with real low-power requirements, nobody's using that USB port anyway.  However I'm not sure, seeing as they used a high-efficiency DC-DC converter for the 3.3V rail and I'm betting that F5528 eZFET chip goes into LPM4 if it has nothing else to do. But still, USB and ULP don't usually go hand-in-hand.
     
    7. Board comes with a cool little USB demo, pushbuttons act like keyboard output and you can browse the contents of a USB mass storage device that shows up.  Reinforcing the urgency behind #6, I think a typical use-case for this board will be sensor sampling "in the field" that you can transfer easily to a PC using a USB mass-storage + CSV output generator feature in the firmware.  Or maybe WiFi config or other RF config can be done using easy text files that get dumped onto the USB mass-storage drive.
     
    8. @@pabigot 's MSPGCC 4.7.0 release, his last one, supports the >64KB address space on this chip using -mmemory-model=large or -mmemory-model=huge.  I've tested this out
     
    9. The RAM is actually 10K; 8KB + 2KB USB RAM that can be used for general purposes if the USB subsystem isn't switched on.  Linker scripts have to be adjusted to use that extra 2KB, but what's funny is in my copy of the msp430mcu files (headers + linker scripts) that Peter released, looking in the msp430f5529 directory there is a "nousb" dir with an alternative memory.x linker script file:
    total 40 drwxr-sr-x@ 6 ebrundic staff 204 Sep 4 12:34 . drwxr-xr-x@ 440 ebrundic staff 14960 Jul 1 12:06 .. -rw-r--r--@ 1 ebrundic staff 1770 Sep 4 12:48 memory.x drwxr-sr-x@ 3 ebrundic staff 102 Jul 1 12:06 nousb -rw-r--r--@ 1 ebrundic staff 15817 Mar 21 21:07 periph.x wmmit032091:msp430f5529 ebrundic$ ls -l nousb/ total 8 -rw-r--r--@ 1 ebrundic staff 1770 Mar 21 21:07 memory.x Saving the original memory.x somewhere and copying nousb/memory.x into the main (msp430f5529/memory.x) file, it gives me access to that extra 2KB.
    USB version:
    MEMORY { sfr : ORIGIN = 0x0000, LENGTH = 0x0010 /* END=0x0010, size 16 */ peripheral_8bit : ORIGIN = 0x0010, LENGTH = 0x00f0 /* END=0x0100, size 240 */ peripheral_16bit : ORIGIN = 0x0100, LENGTH = 0x0100 /* END=0x0200, size 256 */ bsl : ORIGIN = 0x1000, LENGTH = 0x0800 /* END=0x1800, size 2K as 4 512-byte segments */ infomem : ORIGIN = 0x1800, LENGTH = 0x0200 /* END=0x1a00, size 512 as 4 128-byte segments */ infod : ORIGIN = 0x1800, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x1880, size 128 */ infoc : ORIGIN = 0x1880, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x1900, size 128 */ infob : ORIGIN = 0x1900, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x1980, size 128 */ infoa : ORIGIN = 0x1980, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x1a00, size 128 */ usbram (wx) : ORIGIN = 0x1c00, LENGTH = 0x0800 /* END=0x2400, size 2K */ ram (wx) : ORIGIN = 0x2400, LENGTH = 0x2000 /* END=0x4400, size 8K */ rom (rx) : ORIGIN = 0x4400, LENGTH = 0xbb80 /* END=0xff80, size 48000 */ vectors : ORIGIN = 0xff80, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x10000, size 128 as 64 2-byte segments */ far_rom : ORIGIN = 0x00010000, LENGTH = 0x00014400 /* END=0x00024400, size 81K */ /* Remaining banks are absent */ ram2 (wx) : ORIGIN = 0x0000, LENGTH = 0x0000 ram_mirror (wx) : ORIGIN = 0x0000, LENGTH = 0x0000 signature : ORIGIN = 0x0000, LENGTH = 0x0000 } REGION_ALIAS("REGION_TEXT", rom); REGION_ALIAS("REGION_DATA", ram); REGION_ALIAS("REGION_FAR_ROM", far_rom); /* Legacy name, no longer used */ REGION_ALIAS("REGION_FAR_TEXT", far_rom); REGION_ALIAS("REGION_FAR_DATA", ram2); PROVIDE (__info_segment_size = 0x80); PROVIDE (__infod = 0x1800); PROVIDE (__infoc = 0x1880); PROVIDE (__infob = 0x1900); PROVIDE (__infoa = 0x1980); Nousb version:
    MEMORY { sfr : ORIGIN = 0x0000, LENGTH = 0x0010 /* END=0x0010, size 16 */ peripheral_8bit : ORIGIN = 0x0010, LENGTH = 0x00f0 /* END=0x0100, size 240 */ peripheral_16bit : ORIGIN = 0x0100, LENGTH = 0x0100 /* END=0x0200, size 256 */ bsl : ORIGIN = 0x1000, LENGTH = 0x0800 /* END=0x1800, size 2K as 4 512-byte segments */ infomem : ORIGIN = 0x1800, LENGTH = 0x0200 /* END=0x1a00, size 512 as 4 128-byte segments */ infod : ORIGIN = 0x1800, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x1880, size 128 */ infoc : ORIGIN = 0x1880, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x1900, size 128 */ infob : ORIGIN = 0x1900, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x1980, size 128 */ infoa : ORIGIN = 0x1980, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x1a00, size 128 */ ram (wx) : ORIGIN = 0x1c00, LENGTH = 0x2800 /* END=0x4400, size 10K */ rom (rx) : ORIGIN = 0x4400, LENGTH = 0xbb80 /* END=0xff80, size 48000 */ vectors : ORIGIN = 0xff80, LENGTH = 0x0080 /* END=0x10000, size 128 as 64 2-byte segments */ far_rom : ORIGIN = 0x00010000, LENGTH = 0x00014400 /* END=0x00024400, size 81K */ /* Remaining banks are absent */ ram2 (wx) : ORIGIN = 0x0000, LENGTH = 0x0000 ram_mirror (wx) : ORIGIN = 0x0000, LENGTH = 0x0000 signature : ORIGIN = 0x0000, LENGTH = 0x0000 usbram (wx) : ORIGIN = 0x0000, LENGTH = 0x0000 } REGION_ALIAS("REGION_TEXT", rom); REGION_ALIAS("REGION_DATA", ram); REGION_ALIAS("REGION_FAR_ROM", far_rom); /* Legacy name, no longer used */ REGION_ALIAS("REGION_FAR_TEXT", far_rom); REGION_ALIAS("REGION_FAR_DATA", ram2); PROVIDE (__info_segment_size = 0x80); PROVIDE (__infod = 0x1800); PROVIDE (__infoc = 0x1880); PROVIDE (__infob = 0x1900); PROVIDE (__infoa = 0x1980); Not sure if there's an option to msp430-gcc that can force you to use the nousb/memory.x without manually overwriting the main memory.x file, I haven't figured it out yet.
     
    10. The UART includes USCI_A0 on the boosterpack headers, and USCI_A1 connects to the backchannel UART.  So now you can have your cake & eat it too... a GPS boosterpack installed without interfering with your ability to play with backchannel UART comms.  Assuming you don't decide to whip out a USB serial link natively inside the chip, that is.
     
    11. CCS still has a 16K flash code limit, but the idea seems to be that CCSv6 will contain the new RedHat GCC port added as an "unlimited code size" option.  It'll be interesting to see how this works out with the USB developer's package and MSP430Ware stuff that TI already has released for this chip.
     
    12. Remember, F5xxx series have relatively long wakeup times in LPM3/LPM4 when the SVM is enabled I believe.  @@pabigot had a thread about this I think.
     
    13. XT1 and XT2 are both soldered, XT2 has a 4MHz crystal (for accurate USB) and XT1 has your standard 32.768KHz XTAL.  Initializing an F5xxx series chip is substantially different from the value-line parts as to use the DCO you have to enable an FLL loop that "calibrates" the DCO.  I wrote a basic library to do this: https://github.com/spirilis/ucs_clockinit
     
    Cool advantage of this, you can easily overclock the MSP430.  Past experiments with the MSP430F5172 taught me that it can run up to ~56MHz doing a very basic LED blink with __delay_cycles() before it started crashing :grin:
  11. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to BRey in TI Back to School Promotion   
    I found this in the Github project description: "...The CCS IDE is available for FREE to all Meta Watch users that purchased a WDS11x development system or a development clip for STRATA or FRAME. Until there is a special download site, just get the 30 evaluation version and email ccs@metawatch.org when you need your license upgraded."
     
    When I sent the note I included the fact that I have been using CCS for some time so the 30 day evaluation period isn't valid.
     
    I was surprised at the quick response, there are notes in the metawatch forums about multiple week waits.
  12. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to David Bender in Yet another DCO calibrator   
    This DCO calibrator starts with me not having a crystal on my board, and stealing rick's idea about using the UART to calibrate the DCO. It works without the UART peripheral or capture compare. The host sends the 'U' character and the micro responds with what adjustment it made, or that it calibrated to the target frequency. When the micro is calibrated, it sends the calibration constant values to the host, which prints them for the user. I used an oscope to verify the frequency on the P1.4's SMCLK output.
     
    Code is here:
    https://github.com/analog10/UART_DCO_Calibrator
     
    rick's original concept is here:
    https://github.com/RickKimball/msp430_code/blob/master/fabooh/examples/serial/dco_calibrate/goldilocks.cpp
  13. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to rockets4kids in TI releasing something "game changing" on Sept 16th   
    nothing to see here, move along now...
  14. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to RobG in 4D Systems GOLDELOX based BoosterPacks   
    Here are two BoosterPacks from 4D Systems, 96 x 64 pixels OLED and 128 x 128 pixels TFT.
    They both contain powerful GOLDELOX graphics processor, 5 switches, and a microSD socket.
    GOLDELOX and LaunchPad communicate using async serial interface.
    The memory card can be used to store images, icons, video clips and data.
     
    Work on the library is in progress.
     

  15. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to jpnorair in Flutter - Kickstarter to use new TI CC1200   
    Flutter uses CC1101, and they say they want to go to CC1200 in the future.  There's a ton of ambiguity regarding the range, the power, and the chips being used.  Looking at the board, it looks like there is a power amplifier.   US 915MHz requires 500kHz TX bandwidth, so either you are sending a high data rate, crushing it with DSSS, or doing wideband FSK.  Option 2 (DSSS) is not viable on their platform, even with CC1200, so I'm pessimistic that they are meeting 1km range in real-world situations without a PA.
     
    If you want a killer TRX now, go with ST SPIRIT1, Semtech SX 1276, or ADI ADF7023.  CC1200 is playing catch-up for TI, and even so I think the ST and Semtech parts whip it.  I get 3 km range on an ST SPIRIT1, using clever modulation + FEC + interior block coding at 433 MHz... with output power only 4mW.  So no PA.  CC1101 can't do this.
  16. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to rockets4kids in Entry level Inspection / working 3d microscope?   
    People often recommend the Amscope brand for inexpensive entry level scopes:
     
    http://www.amscope.com/lowpower-stereo-binocular.html
     
    The general suggestion seems to be to get something with 5x and 10x magnification.  Amscope has a number of models in the $100 - $150 price range, but the web site doesn't seem to give enough information to tell them apart.
     
    While a USB scope will be fine for inspection, the latency will make it useless for actual construction.
  17. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to spirilis in Ethernet Booster Pack   
    So far I have:
     
    1. TCP server, receiving & replying working
    2. UDP works, and in fact I just wrote a simple DNS library for doing simple A-record lookups!
     
    I did discover that indeed I have to track tx_wr if I want to write piecemeal to the TX buffer, as it doesn't let me read the updated value back after writing, so that increases memory consumption a bit (by 2-bytes per supported socket, so 16 total when W52_MAX_SOCKETS is set to 8 to support all 8 sockets).
     
    This "writing piecemeal" and "reading piecemeal" is a critical feature for low-SRAM chips, since it relieves you from the need to keep huge buffers around...
     
    Going to tackle DHCP next, then once I have those all working... TCP client, TCP server, UDP, DNS A-record, and DHCP, I am going to do a massive cleanup & review before finally releasing it.  So far all of this has been developed on a G2553 btw, and my simple DNS lookup example with a bunch of UART debug output uses 6868 bytes of flash.
     
    Dump of my last conquest (DNS A-record):
    dnslib_gethostbyname("home.spirilis.net"): snippet: 4 snippet: 8 snippet: 3 snippet: 0 Main registers: Mode: 0x00 Sys IRQ: 0x00 Sock IRQ Mask: 0x80 Retry Count: 0x08 Sock IRQ Pending: 0x80 PHY status: 0x27 Sys IRQ Mask: 0x80 Socket #7: Mode: 0x02 IRQ: 0x04 Status: 0x22 Source port: 0x9C40 Dest IP: 0x0A6808C9 Dest port: 0x0035 MSS: 0x05C0 IP TOS: 0x00 IP TTL: 0x80 TX buffer free: 0x0800 TX readptr: 0x0023 TX writeptr: 0x0023 RX recvsize: 0x0010 RX readptr: 0x002B RX writeptr: 0x003B IRQ Mask: 0x1F snippet: 192 Answer name len: 2 Value of Arecord: 1 Flushed=2, pktlen_remains=10 Flushed=4, pktlen_remains=6 Flushed=2, pktlen_remains=4 Flushed=4, pktlen_remains=0 Success: 68.33.56.88
  18. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to Johnbot in TI Back to School Promotion   
    The third week sale is finally here
    http://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/msp430blog/archive/2013/09/01/back-to-school-sale-part-3-ez430-chronos.aspx
  19. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to lastaid in Annoy A Tron 2.0   
    I might need to completly rework this thing. It seems like a problem you might only confronted with in warfare, but if a friend finds this annoyatron and deploys it in your flat, which is way messier due to electronic projects and part bins lying around, you're fucked.
     
    i am currently thinking about making an enclosure that is conductive, uses a pin with cap touch capabilities to check if the device was found and then writes a certain value to flash which disables the annoyatron even if it is restartet. that way only someone with a programmer could re-use it.
     
    this on the other hand might interfere with the low power idea, but i don't have any idea how much energy touch i/o actually eats.
     
    any suggestions?
     
    lastaid
  20. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to username in Budget Workbench Necessites   
    With pretty much all products in general, the massive all in one kits are usually somewhat gimmicks. I'm not a fan of the tip replacement methods on that solder station and i'd recommend buying dedicated solutions.
     
    I'm a huge fan of the Aoyue 2900 because it has fully replicable tips. Integrated into the tips is the heating element and temperature sensor. Keeps iron maintenance extremely easy and allows for fast tip swapping. This is more or less a replica of how the 1000+ USD solder stations work.  
    http://sra-solder.com/product.php/6363/0?gclid=CISrxpy9mbkCFctAMgoddl8AJQ
     
    Then for hot air i'd recommend something like this:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-858D-110V-Hot-Air-Gun-Rework-Station-SMD-Solder-Soldering-Digital-Free-/161027015370?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item257df542ca
  21. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to jpnorair in Budget Workbench Necessites   
    @@GeekDoc
     
    I bought the Aoyue stand-alone hot-air station (852A++) about two years ago.  If you are really short on cash, you can get the 968 kit, but having a good alloy for your soldering iron is really helpful.  I wouldn't expect Aoyue is using nice alloy, but maybe.
     
    I have a ~$120 Weller with digital temperature.  The replacement tips are cheap, and the heat is great.  Together with my binocular microscope I use it successfully for work on 0402 components and even some repair work on 0.5mm pitch LQFPs.
     
    In any case, there is some ODM (probably Chinese) that produces almost all of the low-cost soldering/rework kit.  So, there isn't really a lot of choice unless you want to spend a lot more.  Fortunately, I would say their product is perfectly adequate for hobbyist use.  I also just noticed this product on amazon.com, which is a little bit different.  It might be worth a try.  It does look pretty cool.
     
    http://www.amazon.com/ALL-ONE-X-TRONIC-SOLDERING-PREHEATING/dp/B00DRHRZ3S/ref=sr_1_3?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1377981164&sr=1-3&keywords=air+rework
  22. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to roadrunner84 in We've got babies   
    I got to sharing a picture with you. Look at these two angels   I could share their names with you, but they'd sound odd, since they are Dutch names.

  23. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to RobG in 10W & 20W RGB LED driver board   
    3 channel, high power LED driver, built to fit 10W RGB LEDs (those things are blindingly bright!)
    Now on Tindie.
     

  24. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to simpleavr in Simulating a TI calculator with crazy 11-bit opcodes   
    And has been made available. http://files.righto.com/calculator/sinclair_scientific_simulator.html
     
    Someone has to realize this on msp430.
  25. Like
    GeekDoc reacted to abecedarian in 15 channel PWM with async serial control   
    I think the code should be-
    for(; {
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