Jump to content
43oh

spirilis

Members
  • Content Count

    3,399
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    146

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    spirilis reacted to chicken in Mailbag   
    My free shipping bounty came in today.
     
    All analog components need to be delivered in an anti-static bag, TI certainly takes that seriously.

     
    But unfortunately something went wrong here :-(

  2. Like
    spirilis reacted to roadrunner84 in What's more precise: UART via crystal or DCO?   
    The lower your source clock frequency, the less accurate you can tune your baud rate. So using a 32kiHz source would be less favourable.
    But the crystal is more stable than an RC oscillator (like the DCO), even if the RC oscillator is temperature compensated.
    So using a high frequency source (like the DCO) will help you get a more accurate clock, but it would be less stable than using the crystal.
    The best way would be to regularly tune your internal oscillator to a stable external crystal clock source. This is where PLL comes in to play.
    I think you can use the LFXT as a PLL source to your DCO, but I'm not sure.
     
    As you may have noticed, I kept talking about stability and accuracy, not about reliability. If you want your UART to be reliable, you would prefer the baud rate to be as close to the desired baud rate as possible, with as little jitter or drift as possible.
    For real world scenarios, that drift and jitter is barely a problem when using a baud rate as low as 9600Bdps.
    Also note that in the case of the msp430g2 Launchpad, you cannot go higher without using an external UART to your PC or other peripheral, because the emulator does not support higher baud rates.
     
    I'd err on using the DCO over the LFXT, because you can get a better approximation of the desired baud rate.
  3. Like
    spirilis reacted to bluehash in Dual Stepper Motor Driver Boosterpack featuring ULN2003 and CSD17571Q2   
    New from TI. In preview mode:
    http://www.ti.com/tool/boostxl-uln2003'>Dual Stepper Motor Driver Boosterpack featuring ULN2003 and CSD17571Q2 NexFET

  4. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from yyrkoon in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    I think having specific support on the board for "daughterboards" providing advanced power support is a great idea.  A pinout giving access to 5V, GND, maybe 3.3V, and I2C along with perhaps a GPIO or 2 (maybe for the circuitry to "interrupt" the Sitara without requiring I2C polling?)
  5. Like
    spirilis reacted to yyrkoon in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    This is pretty much what we're doing already, except the solution is not all in one chip. Connectivity is all via I2C though. Which I still have to work out in code for the msp430, For the board we just did a production run on, we did not use I2C. Just a single GPIO, and a toggle count to enable the watchdog feature. It's actually pretty awesome for me to watch it working, as the very first time I ran it it caught, and dealt with a failed boot on the beaglebone. Which is of course why I came up with this idea to begin with. The rest of the features I added after observing the beaglebone in action for 3 and a half years, while noticing 'minor' flaws. Minor as in they are minor flaws, until you actually need the board to go into a production system. Then they become serious flaws.
     
    The real cool thing is that none of this requires anything special on the beaglebone to function correctly. Software wise. You can even run all of this without any special drivers on the beaglebone side. It's a simple matter of connecting these devices to an I2C bus, and using i2c-tools utilities if the user so wishes. However, Linux also has a 'built-in' driver for the ds3232 RTC, which is fairly handy, and really simple to use too.
     
    Anyway, it is my hope to keep costs below $25 per board if possible. The more features added however . . .will increase the cost, of course. Which is why I think adding power switching circuitry is not necessarily a good idea. Regulating a wide range input, maybe. However, with that said, perhaps something like an 'add-on' could work ? I'm kind of envisioning something like a grove connector, that would allow inexpensive add-ons via an i2c bus( for control ).
     
    EDIT:
     
    @@bluehash I was talkign with a friend of mine about cell phone dongles, and he claims that there are USB dongles that cost less than $20. I have not looked into this myself, but if they truly do exist in this price range. It then becomes a simple matter of "bullet proofing" the software ? I'll look into it.
  6. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from yyrkoon in Beaglebone cape in the works.   
    I never bothered to follow up with my idea below but I do think a switching regulator for 12V (maybe modifiable to work up to 60Vin for flexibility with different offgrid DC power systems) is a good idea.
     
    I designed and built one copy of a 12VDC PFET power MOSFET cape which had an off-the-shelf 12V (7-36Vin) to 5V out switcher onboard. It worked great. I highly recommend including one for your design.
     
    The idea behind my cape is 12V could be switched on/off to up to four outputs for remotely controlling power for various sub-5A sources e.g. a low flow pump. The beaglebone is powered by the same 12V source obviously.
  7. Like
    spirilis reacted to yyrkoon in Who is using rPI ?   
    I've answered a lot of beaglebone questions in the last 3.5+ years. I've not always been nice about it. A character flaw that some times gets the best of me I guess. My mentality of that is if a person is not going to put forth the energy to do what they want done - Why should I ? However, I do understand that it can be frustrating to try and get something done. Especially, for instance if you've been using Debian for many years. I'm sure you understand the concept of "Debian without systemd" As in, I already know how to do that with sysv, why would I want to learn something new ?
     
    Then I also forget that I've been using Debian since the 90's( sometimes in spurts ). . . while many of these people barely even know what Linux *is*.
  8. Like
    spirilis reacted to SteveR in Who is using rPI ?   
    I have 11 and a twelfth on the way. I am also one of the mods on Stack Exchanges' Pi specific site. I use my Pi's to run my information dashboard, build light, and I am currently working on a bench cam that will move left to right above the bench as well as pan and tilt.
  9. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from yyrkoon in Who is using rPI ?   
    Just got my RPi3 and had a chance to play with it today.  Stupidly simple to set up... a simple uncommenting of lines in /boot/config.txt to enable SPI, I2C, I2S etc.
     
    The bcm2835 library seems to support hitting SPI et al from C easily enough.  http://www.airspayce.com/mikem/bcm2835/
    So it's easy to get started with and stupidly simple for any reasonably experienced Linux admin to use.  The current Raspbian doesn't support the ARM Cortex-A53's 64-bit mode yet, so it runs in armv7l 32-bit mode, but it's still quad-core.
     
    Looks like the RPi foundation supports the GPGPU project for writing code that utilizes the GPU, and there are examples shipping for e.g. "hello_fft" accelerated by the GPU.  Since the GPU is supposed to be bomb-diggity fast on those BCM283x chips, that outta be a good frontier for more serious projects to consider especially e.g. DSP work.
  10. Like
    spirilis reacted to chicken in Who is using rPI ?   
    My Pi collection of just tripled today.

     
    Any suggestions on how to network the Zero?
  11. Like
    spirilis reacted to veryalive in CCS for $9.99   
    @blankname    --   and others interested in the 16KB code limit of the 'free' CS compiler.
     
    Yes, I too found I could compile a file with more than 16KB code loaded into an MSP device. (Using the 'free version' on Windows, CCS v 6.1.3)
     
    As I have a licence now (yet to be implemented on this machine), I'm not too worried about future changes TI may make in counting / restricting compiled code size.
    For my part, I sort of assumed it was a TI CCS bug as the compiler version number (v15 etc)  looks much different than pervious ones (v4.x).
     
    Attached is a text file with my test code and results in a short report format I made for my notes.
     
    Cheers.
     
     
    edit   ....     (note ........   trying to find out how to add a file to this post)  (have to select 'use full editor')Code size GT 16KB CCSv6.1.3.txt
  12. Like
    spirilis reacted to Fmilburn in Who is using rPI ?   
    Fortunately it is also easy to get started for those of us who barely have a clue   I bought one a while back to get better acquainted with linux but it hasn't received that much use yet.  One of these days....
  13. Like
    spirilis reacted to yyrkoon in CCS for $9.99   
    Oh, i totally get that aspect of it. But I guess that personally, I mainly only use the G2553, where the gcc port, and tools are very good. I'm sure that the TI toolchain has better optimization. But how important is that really for most projects ? I'm guessing that it's not all that important most of the time.
     
    But the reason why I'm mostly only interested in the G2553, is that if I need a low power MCU, the G2553 will work for most cases. The price per part is very good as well. But if I need more processing power, more pins, or peripherals, then I probably won't even consider using an MSP430. Instead I'd probably go with an ARM core, where there are many, many options. Including from TI, but not limited to TI parts.
  14. Like
    spirilis reacted to skytoastar in CCS for $9.99   
    I saw this a few days ago on TI's site and finally bit the bullet. I have a Chronos watch that I want the full license for. But I love all the new dev boards that are coming out, too. I get that Pokemon feeling when I look through all the neat boards you can get for <$20 and all the cool boosterpacks. Gotta catch 'em all!
  15. Like
    spirilis reacted to bluehash in Who is using rPI ?   
    I have the RPi3. It controls all my sprinklers and is automated via open sprinkler.
    I spent two days setting it up and it is now in my home crawl space.
    It connects to my home wifi, so I can connect to it from anywhere(through a port forward).
     
    The only thing I bought for out was the relay board.
  16. Like
    spirilis reacted to yyrkoon in gpio interrupts   
    Yeah, I think that's it @@spirilis. I think it's definately at least a TXB part. But 3 of us all fairly smart people could not make heads nor tails of the datasheet table that describes the pin functions.
     
    So right now, I'm experiencing another issue in my code. I'm trying to setup a pulse counter on one of the gpio's and it's not working the way I'd expect. These g2553's only have edge detection on interrupt right ? So like if my external pin in always low, and I'm clearing the interrupt flag on a falling edge interrupt. It wont count multiple interrupts. Will it ?
     
    EDIT:
     
    By the way, the way we figured out how the part works. My buddy soldered resistors to all the pins, just to have something to get a scope probe attached to. Then we just starting feeding 3v3 into each side of each channel and observed what was going on . . .
  17. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from yyrkoon in gpio interrupts   
    Sounds like a level shifter, like a TXB0102 or similar?  I've had some experience with those.  Yeah the whole idea is A1 & B1 talk together, A2 & B2 talk together.  If it's a bidirectional "sensing" type of chip like the TXB, on top of that you have to acknowledge that the drive strength on the outputs are limited, e.g. they don't recommend using pullups or pulldowns lower than 50K ohms in value on any of the pins intended to receive output from one of the channels...
     
    Where I've used the TXB is to power down the A-side voltage (on the TXB at least, VccA must be <= VccB, also the EN pin is attached to the Vcc(A) net.  The host MCU turns off a PFET supplying Vcc(A) so that the TXB shuts down, and all the hardware on the A-side shuts down so it uses no power (think MAX31855 thermocouple chip... has no native way to shut itself off so it just keeps drinking current nonstop unless you surround it with a mousetrap like this).
  18. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from Fmilburn in Serial not receiving all available bytes or state machine hangs   
    Actually another idea could be to use SPI, transmitting debug info over SPI would be loads quicker than Serial UART and you could get full bytes of information sent that way.  Pick it up with the logic analyzer and use the protocol decode feature in the software.
  19. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from yyrkoon in gpio interrupts   
    Nothing here jumps out at me in terms of smoking guns.  Can you post the setup() routine?
  20. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from dubnet in RANT: Cloud of this, IoT of that . . .   
    Money is essentially power when you simplify the concepts a bit.  Finite amounts of money usually beget finite amounts of resources, but humans require a steady stream of resources over time to achieve life, indeed death is the cessation of the continual resource train we require.
     
    Thus, those who control the money flow, control life.  That is true "power".
     
    And the companies vying for control over the IoT technologies know that their influence could give them structural insight & control over the development of this technology in the future, and they are betting this tech will be disruptive enough that it will become desirable-and eventually necessary for modern society (much as the cellphone has crossed this threshold I would argue), so it's a competition to see who can capture the most converts and followers and convince them to use their products.  Beware the embodied marketing behind most connected technology these days, it's all laced with puppet strings from competing companies just waiting for the right time to "pull" and orchestrate their self-serving surreptitous agenda (that is, of course, not so secret - it's the continual maximization of margin, of having the true structural capability to charge you more money for less so their rich shareholders receive ever more increasing levels of profit).
     
    The value of open standards, and of open source, in this arena lies in the power of choice- when technology is based on open standards agreed upon by most, each provider and player can be kept honest by the manner in which their customers can "choose" another vendor without significant pain.  The "IoT" crap we've seen so far is anything BUT open, and open standards may still be a long ways out... initiatives like OpenThread sound promising but, when backed by a zillion companies, beware the politics of sharks when you are nothing but a clownfish.
     
    However all this scary capitalism overshadows the real value of connecting things - the "emergent sum" concept, when interconnected and interrelated processes (the promise of IoT, I think?) can create qualities not otherwise intuitive or obvious.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emergence
    Base the tech on open standards, and we may all benefit in some form that might not be totally obvious to us until 10-20 years into the future.
  21. Like
    spirilis reacted to chicken in RANT: Cloud of this, IoT of that . . .   
    I think we're currently in the AOL and CompuServe stage of IoT. Here's hope that there's an equivalent of Tim Berners-Lee out there who will invent an open and simple but good-enough way to integrate all these devices.
     
    There will always be the Facebooks and Apples that try to capture their users in a closed system, but eventually the system that gives customers the right balance of simplicity and interoperability will dominate. Think HTML and REST over HTTP vs. Corba, J2EE, SOAP and many other dead sophisticated technologies that were supposed to take over the computer-to-computer communication.
     
    On the "widget tied to cloud services" tangent: Today, most hardware startups are pressured by their VCs to come up with a business model with recurring revenue. See the many blog posts about hardware business on Bolt.io to get a taste of it, e.g. this one.
     
    I doubt that this model is sustainable in the long run for applications where there's no real benefit for the customer to be tied to a vendor's internet service (locks, lights, litter box, fridge, ...). Having to develop and sustain an internet service adds a significant complexity, cost and time-to-market handicap. There will be hardware companies that copy the good idea (automated odor control for the litter box) without the baggage (vendor lock-in for refills, stink when the internet is down, ..), and probably they will be able to sell it to you for less money.
  22. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from yyrkoon in RANT: Cloud of this, IoT of that . . .   
    Money is essentially power when you simplify the concepts a bit.  Finite amounts of money usually beget finite amounts of resources, but humans require a steady stream of resources over time to achieve life, indeed death is the cessation of the continual resource train we require.
     
    Thus, those who control the money flow, control life.  That is true "power".
     
    And the companies vying for control over the IoT technologies know that their influence could give them structural insight & control over the development of this technology in the future, and they are betting this tech will be disruptive enough that it will become desirable-and eventually necessary for modern society (much as the cellphone has crossed this threshold I would argue), so it's a competition to see who can capture the most converts and followers and convince them to use their products.  Beware the embodied marketing behind most connected technology these days, it's all laced with puppet strings from competing companies just waiting for the right time to "pull" and orchestrate their self-serving surreptitous agenda (that is, of course, not so secret - it's the continual maximization of margin, of having the true structural capability to charge you more money for less so their rich shareholders receive ever more increasing levels of profit).
     
    The value of open standards, and of open source, in this arena lies in the power of choice- when technology is based on open standards agreed upon by most, each provider and player can be kept honest by the manner in which their customers can "choose" another vendor without significant pain.  The "IoT" crap we've seen so far is anything BUT open, and open standards may still be a long ways out... initiatives like OpenThread sound promising but, when backed by a zillion companies, beware the politics of sharks when you are nothing but a clownfish.
     
    However all this scary capitalism overshadows the real value of connecting things - the "emergent sum" concept, when interconnected and interrelated processes (the promise of IoT, I think?) can create qualities not otherwise intuitive or obvious.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emergence
    Base the tech on open standards, and we may all benefit in some form that might not be totally obvious to us until 10-20 years into the future.
  23. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from veryalive in RANT: Cloud of this, IoT of that . . .   
    Money is essentially power when you simplify the concepts a bit.  Finite amounts of money usually beget finite amounts of resources, but humans require a steady stream of resources over time to achieve life, indeed death is the cessation of the continual resource train we require.
     
    Thus, those who control the money flow, control life.  That is true "power".
     
    And the companies vying for control over the IoT technologies know that their influence could give them structural insight & control over the development of this technology in the future, and they are betting this tech will be disruptive enough that it will become desirable-and eventually necessary for modern society (much as the cellphone has crossed this threshold I would argue), so it's a competition to see who can capture the most converts and followers and convince them to use their products.  Beware the embodied marketing behind most connected technology these days, it's all laced with puppet strings from competing companies just waiting for the right time to "pull" and orchestrate their self-serving surreptitous agenda (that is, of course, not so secret - it's the continual maximization of margin, of having the true structural capability to charge you more money for less so their rich shareholders receive ever more increasing levels of profit).
     
    The value of open standards, and of open source, in this arena lies in the power of choice- when technology is based on open standards agreed upon by most, each provider and player can be kept honest by the manner in which their customers can "choose" another vendor without significant pain.  The "IoT" crap we've seen so far is anything BUT open, and open standards may still be a long ways out... initiatives like OpenThread sound promising but, when backed by a zillion companies, beware the politics of sharks when you are nothing but a clownfish.
     
    However all this scary capitalism overshadows the real value of connecting things - the "emergent sum" concept, when interconnected and interrelated processes (the promise of IoT, I think?) can create qualities not otherwise intuitive or obvious.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emergence
    Base the tech on open standards, and we may all benefit in some form that might not be totally obvious to us until 10-20 years into the future.
  24. Like
    spirilis reacted to enl in RANT: Cloud of this, IoT of that . . .   
    It already is. They go hand in hand.
  25. Like
    spirilis got a reaction from roadrunner84 in RANT: Cloud of this, IoT of that . . .   
    The real problem always boils down to the ownership IMO. Cloud this, cloud that smells offensively to me of greedy entrepreneurs trying to shoehorn a rent-seeking paradigm into something that should be anything but. It's stunting the widespread adoption IMO by keeping it only within the realm of the wealthy and early-adopting type of folks. The terms themself in combination with the verbiage used around it defines the space of what people know and think about, to the marketer's advantage.
×
×
  • Create New...