Jump to content

jpnorair

Members
  • Content Count

    718
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    18

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from tripwire in CC13xx Application Integration Survey   
    Answering some of my own questions (for posterity):
     
    Turns out that all I need to do to port most TI-RTOS drivers to another OS is to provide an interface to five headers.  So that's good news for Energia-MT.
     
    Here's a link, describing more.  You can see the driver support matrix, but scroll down to the "Driver Ports" section to see the specific method for attacking a port job.  I tip my hat to TI, they did a nice thing, here.
    Drivers: TI-RTOS Full Driver API Reference
  2. Like
    jpnorair reacted to spirilis in How to program a CC1310F64RHBT in Energia   
    Without having any way of seeing your breadboard adapter socket soldering job and where the passives are, my first assumption is you probably did something wrong with the chip's layout; FYI this isn't a chip you can casually "solder to an adapter" and expect it to work.  It has several passives including an inductor, multiple values of decoupling capacitors, a 24MHz XTAL without load caps (load caps are internal) along with a 32.768KHz XTAL with load caps that are expected (earlier revisions of the CC1310 chip couldn't run without the 32.768KHz XTAL).  I've been successful in rolling my own boards by designing them from scratch but closely following the layout decisions demonstrated by TI's own reference designs.
  3. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from RobG in CC13xx Application Integration Survey   
    Answering some of my own questions (for posterity):
     
    Turns out that all I need to do to port most TI-RTOS drivers to another OS is to provide an interface to five headers.  So that's good news for Energia-MT.
     
    Here's a link, describing more.  You can see the driver support matrix, but scroll down to the "Driver Ports" section to see the specific method for attacking a port job.  I tip my hat to TI, they did a nice thing, here.
    Drivers: TI-RTOS Full Driver API Reference
  4. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from Fmilburn in CC13xx Application Integration Survey   
    Answering some of my own questions (for posterity):
     
    Turns out that all I need to do to port most TI-RTOS drivers to another OS is to provide an interface to five headers.  So that's good news for Energia-MT.
     
    Here's a link, describing more.  You can see the driver support matrix, but scroll down to the "Driver Ports" section to see the specific method for attacking a port job.  I tip my hat to TI, they did a nice thing, here.
    Drivers: TI-RTOS Full Driver API Reference
  5. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from Fred in CC13xx Application Integration Survey   
    Answering some of my own questions (for posterity):
     
    Turns out that all I need to do to port most TI-RTOS drivers to another OS is to provide an interface to five headers.  So that's good news for Energia-MT.
     
    Here's a link, describing more.  You can see the driver support matrix, but scroll down to the "Driver Ports" section to see the specific method for attacking a port job.  I tip my hat to TI, they did a nice thing, here.
    Drivers: TI-RTOS Full Driver API Reference
  6. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from spirilis in CC13xx Application Integration Survey   
    Answering some of my own questions (for posterity):
     
    Turns out that all I need to do to port most TI-RTOS drivers to another OS is to provide an interface to five headers.  So that's good news for Energia-MT.
     
    Here's a link, describing more.  You can see the driver support matrix, but scroll down to the "Driver Ports" section to see the specific method for attacking a port job.  I tip my hat to TI, they did a nice thing, here.
    Drivers: TI-RTOS Full Driver API Reference
  7. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from Rickta59 in CC13xx Application Integration Survey   
    Hey folks:
     
    I've been working on CC13xx for some time now, porting OpenTag and various other new stuff to it.  I'm not using TI-RTOS -- too clunky.  As usual (for those who know me), I've pushed the RF to the limit and it is shaping up to be a formidable LPWAN/LAN option.
     
    Anyway, I'm trying to decide how I want to enable 3rd party applications.  NuttX is one option, but someone (or I) will need to port that, too.  Energia/MT might be another option -- we'll still need to port that.  I'd be happy to take any information on this topic.  What would be best?
     
    1. Network processor with another MCU for application FW
    2. NuttX
    3. Energia-MT
    4. Something else
  8. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from spirilis in CC13xx Application Integration Survey   
    Hey folks:
     
    I've been working on CC13xx for some time now, porting OpenTag and various other new stuff to it.  I'm not using TI-RTOS -- too clunky.  As usual (for those who know me), I've pushed the RF to the limit and it is shaping up to be a formidable LPWAN/LAN option.
     
    Anyway, I'm trying to decide how I want to enable 3rd party applications.  NuttX is one option, but someone (or I) will need to port that, too.  Energia/MT might be another option -- we'll still need to port that.  I'd be happy to take any information on this topic.  What would be best?
     
    1. Network processor with another MCU for application FW
    2. NuttX
    3. Energia-MT
    4. Something else
  9. Like
    jpnorair reacted to cameron in Eagle Library for CC1310   
    Hello,
     
    I am looking for a working Eagle library for the CC1310F64RHBT. I am not experienced with creating .lbr files for Eagle, but after some googling I have produced a rough one which is based on a conversion from the Ultra Librarian .bxl format. If anyone has a working library that they already use, it would be super helpful if they could share it with me. Taking a look at the library attached below which I have produced and confirming that the SMD footprint will work would be super helpful.
     
    Thanks,
    Cameron
    CC1310F64RHB.lbr
  10. Like
    jpnorair reacted to igor in eLua for SAM3 (Arduino Due)   
    It is on github in my fork of eLua, in the branch named SAM.
    The direct link is.
    https://github.com/ecdr/elua/tree/SAM
     
    Most of the SAM specific adaptations are in the src/platform/sam34 directory.
    https://github.com/ecdr/elua/tree/SAM/src/platform/sam34
     
    If you haven't used git it takes a bit of learning, but is really nice when using/managing a large project.
    I haven't done much on this recently, but would welcome contributions to the branch.  (Would be nice to get it totally working
    and incorporate into the eLua main line.)
  11. Like
    jpnorair reacted to igor in eLua for SAM3 (Arduino Due)   
    I am porting eLua to the Atmel SAM3/4 processors, in particular the SAM3X8E used in the Arduino Due.
     
    Port is running, with support for the serial console and several devices.
     
    PIO - works UART - works, except for buffering (xmodem does not work on serial console).  Hardware flow control written, but not tested. USB CDC - works, except for buffering (although attached build does not use it). Timers - works PWM - works, but has some issues (sometimes the drivers return wrong values to eLua, but it does work).  Have not tested for accuracy of frequency or duty cycle.  So far just uses the hardware pwms, use of timers as PWM (e.g., so can use more pins for PWM) is in the works. spi - written, but not tested (if you try it out, let me know). rand (generate numbers at random) - works rtc - works (but not sure about using external crystal) i2c (twi) - not finished adc - not finished can - not finished cnt (counter) - not finished dac - not written  
    Source code available on github -
    https://github.com/ecdr/eluain the SAM branch To talk to the console, use the programming port on the Arduino Due Usual settings 115200 baud, N, 8, 1You may need to set your terminal program to send a CR and LF as end of line. You can program the attached bin file to an Arduino Due using the Arduino boot loader (bossac).e.g., if the programming port is connected as COM8 (on windows) bossac.exe -Ufalse -pCOM8 -e -w -v -b elua_lua_arduinodue.bin -R Thank you to Sergio at simplemachines.it For my eLua port for the Stellaris launchpad, see
    http://forum.stellarisiti.com/topic/552-elua-for-stellaris-launchpad
    elua_lua_arduinodue.zip
  12. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from JasonP in Using RTC as an ultra-low-power timer for the likes of MSP432   
    I posted a blog entry about how I used the STM32L1 RTC (a few years ago) as a tickless, ultra-low-power timer for my RTOS.  http://www.indigresso.com/_blog/?p=181
     
    The MSP432 has a similar problem.  Only the RTC and Watchdogs run in LPM3 and 3.5, no other timers do, but you want to use those LPMs for timed sleep!  There is a workaround, and it is actually very fast thanks to the really great ALU in the CM3 and CM4 devices.  My code is also implemented in bulletproof production firmware that I've shipped to various industries .
     
    Yes, the code is for STM32L1, but I think you should be able to very easily port it to MSP432.  If you wait long enough, I already will have ported it, but I noticed some forum activity on this very topic last week and I had to step in.
     
    Happy Coding.
  13. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from tripwire in I want to buy an awesome 3D Printer   
    It's worth a deeper inspection.  The biggest problem I see is that the price appears too low for the company to be able to sustain it.  So many Kickstarter projects fail because the creators have no business experience and they don't know what pricing they need to make the business work.  Because this is the norm instead of the exception, KS incites a race-to-the-bottom as each project is competing on price with the last several projects, and these were also priced too low and failed.  If it is all open sourced this is less of an issue -- but I didn't see that it was open-sourced.  I don't think it is.
     
     
     
    I would like to have the ability to mill aluminum, copper, and brass.  I have zero interest in steel.  I have never used steel in a project, but if I do I'm going to find someone else who knows what the hell he is doing.
     
    The laser cutter is a new wrinkle.  It might be preferable to the mill for cutting shapes out of metal sheet, which can be a big part of antenna prototyping.
     
     
    Edit: (non sequitur)
    I just watched the BoXZY video.  A product like this should have some sort of heavy accompanying music in the video, like a hard rock, metal, or even a heavy classical piece.  Is it supposed to be cute or awesome?  Instead it's the same valium elevator music in every KS video.  Seriously, if it opened up with some heavy chords I would have signed-up for the $3000 supreme.  
  14. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from spirilis in STM32 Gets the Cortex-M7 - STM32F746   
    It seems to me like it's in a bit of a no-man's-land, between MCU RTOS options and Linux.  I can't think of what I want to do with it: I'm either doing things for M0/M3, a few rare things for M4 that benefit from floating point (or fast ADCs that typically come with the M4 MCUs), or else I want Linux.  I guess I hold-out hope that there's a roadmap where M7 MCUs get enough RAM & ROM to start running lightweight Linuxes.
  15. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from zlalanne in NuttX Port -- looking for cooperators   
    NuttX is one of the better MCU RTOS's I've encountered.  It is designed and written by a team of experts, it comes from the private-sector (so they have to keep focused on things that matter), and the support is good.  And it's open source.
    www.nuttx.org
     
    I'd like to port to MSP432.  I would also like to integrate a low-power BIOS into it, because at present the scheduling architecture isn't well-suited to using the ultra-low-power sleep modes on ARM.  This second task, I've already done in large part for OpenTag on STM32L, but integration is never plug-and-play with this stuff.
     
    Ping me if interested!  I'll set-up a GitHub repo momentarily.  You should have an MSP432 Launchpad, as that will be the target board.  If you've worked on NuttX, even better.
  16. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from bluehash in Anyone use kapton tape?   
    Kapton (polyimide) has high resistance to chemicals, and it can take a lot of heat without melting.  It is sort-of default for copper etched films and things that are exposed to chemicals and/or heat, but imidized plastics are quite pricey.  If you can find polyester/PET/mylar tape, you'll probably get a better deal and, practically, no worse performance.
  17. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from tripwire in Anyone use kapton tape?   
    Kapton (polyimide) has high resistance to chemicals, and it can take a lot of heat without melting.  It is sort-of default for copper etched films and things that are exposed to chemicals and/or heat, but imidized plastics are quite pricey.  If you can find polyester/PET/mylar tape, you'll probably get a better deal and, practically, no worse performance.
  18. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from Adnan in Energy harvesting   
    Boost is easier.  At night the panel will be low-voltage.  At dawn it will increase voltage.  If you use a low-voltage solar cell, then you can keep the entire voltage range in the boost regime.  This is easier than buck-boost and more efficient.
     
    I designed a WSN device using a 1.9V solar cell.  In maximum California-summer sunlight it was 1.8V.  Indoors next to a window it was between 0.4-1.0V depending on the time of day.  With office lighting, it was between 0.2-0.8V.  The point here is that the whole voltage range will be observed during the operation of the device.
  19. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from Lgbeno in Energy harvesting   
    Boost is easier.  At night the panel will be low-voltage.  At dawn it will increase voltage.  If you use a low-voltage solar cell, then you can keep the entire voltage range in the boost regime.  This is easier than buck-boost and more efficient.
     
    I designed a WSN device using a 1.9V solar cell.  In maximum California-summer sunlight it was 1.8V.  Indoors next to a window it was between 0.4-1.0V depending on the time of day.  With office lighting, it was between 0.2-0.8V.  The point here is that the whole voltage range will be observed during the operation of the device.
  20. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from RROMANO001 in MSP430F550x based USB - UART bridge   
    Fine, but if you want to build a real product, you need to care.  If you want to build a hobbyist board with no warranty, then it really doesn't matter.
  21. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from RROMANO001 in MSP430F550x based USB - UART bridge   
    If you have an architecture loosely based on TI's library, just set the RX timer for ~50us each time you service the X/Y buffer or get the data detection event.  If the timer expires, it means the stream has stopped before the Y/X buffer (respectively) has filled.  I can tell you for certain that this strategy works (I have no benchmarks, but for transfers that are multiples of 64 bytes, there is no overhead).  You'll need also to send a stall command while waiting for the UART to finish, but I'm sure you knew that already.
  22. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from bluehash in Ethertronics Antenna   
    Ethertronics makes some chip antennas, but they also do a lot of custom antenna design work.  This could be a custom part for some product.  
  23. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from bluehash in Ethertronics Antenna   
    I'm not sure what it is, apart from the fact that it's an antenna designed to fit into some particular enclosure.  You'll need to attach the little grommet to your board's ground.  If you don't have a proper connector for this, you can just cut it off and solder directly.
  24. Like
    jpnorair reacted to spirilis in CC26XX Decapping And Comparison   
    Looking at CC2540 as an example, it looks like TI's price guidance is around the $3 mark more or less (at 1ku).
  25. Like
    jpnorair got a reaction from spirilis in CC26XX Decapping And Comparison   
    The technical reference manual provides some insight.  There is an 115KB ROM that contains the PHY control and partial MAC for 802.15.4 and BLE.  I suppose on the ZigBee model it contains some additional ZigBee stuff.  BLE and ZigBee aren't free.  They bear a royalty that TI has to pay.  On top of that, TI is charging a premium for the convenience.
     
    As nice as these chips are, they won't get designed-in to anything until the volume cost is around $3, or lower.  Maybe it is already there.
×
×
  • Create New...