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sq7bti

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  1. Like
    sq7bti reacted to spirilis in [Energia Library] ILI9341 TFT 2.2 port   
    PS- Did Seeed really misspell the word "Triangle"?
    void drawTraingle(int poX1, int poY1, int poX2, int poY2, int poX3, int poY3, uint16_t color); ...
    void TFT::drawTraingle( int poX1, int poY1, int poX2, int poY2, int poX3, int poY3, uint16_t color) { drawLine(poX1, poY1, poX2, poY2,color); drawLine(poX1, poY1, poX3, poY3,color); drawLine(poX2, poY2, poX3, poY3,color); } I'm slightly amused  Think I'm going to use this as my first experiment with writing a TivaWare GraphLib driver, porting the code over to C.
  2. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from tripwire in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Progress:

    A summary of changes:
    instead of unipolar motor drivers, now I used a bipolar drivers very popular in RepRap projects, here A4988 (or DRV8825) 28byj-48 modified for bipolar cheap HC-05 for bluetooth SPP GPS module U-blox NEO-6m added RTC DS1307 to provide date/time reference even in the first seconds after power-on and 56 of NVRAM bytes added (optional) humidity and temperature sensor DSTH01 added a I2C socket to connect external temperature sensors to provide information about motors temperatures added PCF8574 for microstepping configuration of A4988 drivers added buzzer for audible indication added output for 12Vdc fan of main mirror - PWM controlled Nokia 5110 display replaced with a red back-light
     
    As the software is concerned, there were several improvements as well. The most important is that the motors are now driven by an interrupt driven AccelStepper
     

     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
  3. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from bluehash in Daylight Saving Time detection and adjustment   
    Formulas for US and EU beginnings and endings of DST:
     
    For the United States:
    Begin DST: Sunday April (2+6*y-y/4) mod 7+1
    End DST: Sunday October (31-(y*5/4+1) mod 7)
    Valid for years 1900 to 2006, though DST wasn't adopted until the 1950s-1960s. 2007 and after:
    Begin DST: Sunday March 14 - (1 + y*5/4) mod 7
    End DST: Sunday November 7 - (1 + y*5/4) mod 7;
    European Economic Community:
    Begin DST: Sunday March (31 - (5*y/4 + 4) mod 7) at 1h U.T.
    End DST: Sunday October (31 - (5*y/4 + 1) mod 7) at 1h U.T.
    Since 1996, valid through 2099
    (Equations by Wei-Hwa Huang (US), and Robert H. van Gent (EC))
     
    taken from http://www.webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/i.html
  4. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from kodi in Daylight Saving Time detection and adjustment   
    Formulas for US and EU beginnings and endings of DST:
     
    For the United States:
    Begin DST: Sunday April (2+6*y-y/4) mod 7+1
    End DST: Sunday October (31-(y*5/4+1) mod 7)
    Valid for years 1900 to 2006, though DST wasn't adopted until the 1950s-1960s. 2007 and after:
    Begin DST: Sunday March 14 - (1 + y*5/4) mod 7
    End DST: Sunday November 7 - (1 + y*5/4) mod 7;
    European Economic Community:
    Begin DST: Sunday March (31 - (5*y/4 + 4) mod 7) at 1h U.T.
    End DST: Sunday October (31 - (5*y/4 + 1) mod 7) at 1h U.T.
    Since 1996, valid through 2099
    (Equations by Wei-Hwa Huang (US), and Robert H. van Gent (EC))
     
    taken from http://www.webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/i.html
  5. Like
    sq7bti reacted to tml in MSP430-based solar-powered weather station   
    Hi Folks,
    Some time ago in a thread http://forum.43oh.com/topic/5550-simple-msp430f5529-bootloader/
    I shared my bootloader that I wrote for my weather station project.
    I'd like to share some info on the project that I have completed and that its now operating in the field.
     
    Link to the description: http://eltomek.blogspot.com/2014/10/diy-weather-station.html
     
    All comments are welcome. Thanks all from this forum who helped me in numerous posts where I had no idea how to get out of technical issues!
     
    Best Regards,
    Tomek
     

  6. Like
    sq7bti reacted to spirilis in TM4C129 Hibernation RTC and Calendar Mode   
    Looking at the TM4C1294 Connected LaunchPad schematic, there is a populated resistor you might be able to remove in order to source VBAT separately, but you'd be surface-soldering a wire to a tiny resistor pad in order to do so...
    http://www.ti.com/lit/spmu365 - page 31, see "VBAT" and resistor R38.  But it'd be much nicer if there was a PTH pad attached to VBAT so you could easily include a non-boosterpack-standard pin on a custom BoosterPack which provides an alternate VBAT source.  (side note- I'm sending feedback to TI asking for this feature in future revisions or models of the Tiva series)
  7. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from AcidBurn_2014 in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Progress:

    A summary of changes:
    instead of unipolar motor drivers, now I used a bipolar drivers very popular in RepRap projects, here A4988 (or DRV8825) 28byj-48 modified for bipolar cheap HC-05 for bluetooth SPP GPS module U-blox NEO-6m added RTC DS1307 to provide date/time reference even in the first seconds after power-on and 56 of NVRAM bytes added (optional) humidity and temperature sensor DSTH01 added a I2C socket to connect external temperature sensors to provide information about motors temperatures added PCF8574 for microstepping configuration of A4988 drivers added buzzer for audible indication added output for 12Vdc fan of main mirror - PWM controlled Nokia 5110 display replaced with a red back-light
     
    As the software is concerned, there were several improvements as well. The most important is that the motors are now driven by an interrupt driven AccelStepper
     

     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
  8. Like
    sq7bti reacted to reaper7 in [Energia Library] Nokia 5110 LCD BoosterPack/Breakout PCB   
    about 2:
    I think that the lines:
    CS_LOW and CS_HIGH are not needed
    when you replace SPI.transfer((char)c);
    by another call: SPI.transfer(_pinChipSelect, (char)c);
    which execute SPIClass::transfer(uint8_t ssPin, uint8_t data) -> SPIClass::transfer(uint8_t ssPin, uint8_t data, uint8_t transferMode)
    where lines:
    169 sets CS 5110 to LOW and
    176 sets CS 5110 back to HIGH
  9. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from dubnet in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Progress:

    A summary of changes:
    instead of unipolar motor drivers, now I used a bipolar drivers very popular in RepRap projects, here A4988 (or DRV8825) 28byj-48 modified for bipolar cheap HC-05 for bluetooth SPP GPS module U-blox NEO-6m added RTC DS1307 to provide date/time reference even in the first seconds after power-on and 56 of NVRAM bytes added (optional) humidity and temperature sensor DSTH01 added a I2C socket to connect external temperature sensors to provide information about motors temperatures added PCF8574 for microstepping configuration of A4988 drivers added buzzer for audible indication added output for 12Vdc fan of main mirror - PWM controlled Nokia 5110 display replaced with a red back-light
     
    As the software is concerned, there were several improvements as well. The most important is that the motors are now driven by an interrupt driven AccelStepper
     

     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
  10. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from petertux in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Hello everyone,
     
    There is a couple of similar projects available on the internet. Some of them base on Arduino and PIC performs very basic mount control without math intensive computation implemented in embedded controller. I decided to build my own with the following goals:
    ease of use by an inexperienced amateur astronomer (full automatic operation) precision and resolution of position  last but not least: the price Final, or better say at the moment, design comprises of the following components:
    Stellaris LM4F launchpad central control unit, two ULN2003 unipolar stepper motor driver chips, two 28byj-48 stepper motors one moving in azimuth, and in elevation via gear train, communication module: Bluetooth serial module. It allows sending a coordinate set-point and provides position feedback to Stellarium, GPS module providing position and precise time reference - PPS gives 1us accuracy, Nokia 5110 display unit and joystick for standalone operation, now obsolete mouse (PS/2) modified to provide independent (incremental) position information Resolution that was reached is a single step of approx. 5". Given the size of Jupiter to range from 30" to 50", this positioning resolution makes the view comfortably stable in standard 60° FOV eyepiece at reasonably high magnification, without the need to adjust AZ/ALT continuously.
     
    During the development I made use of several opensource and projects available online, namely:
    AccelStepper for stepper control, TinyGPS++ for NMEA decoding, Arduino telescope controller was my inspiration and reference for Taki's matrix method for coordinates transformation, of course Energia as my IDE Upon power-up the mount is performing:
    homing acquisition of current location (longitude/latitude) and time via NMEA stream moves to 3 brightest (most convenient) stars in succession to perform 3 star alignment procedure - they are selected from the list of over 500 stars in built-in catalog (the  brightest are used for the alignment, tough), once aligned the mount is in tracking mode: it tracks the view to counter the apparent movement of objects in the sky, waiting, either for the user to move to particular object - selected from the library of stars and Messier objects, or awaits connection via Bluetooth from a PC running Stellarium with a plugin and slews to selected object. search for the object that should be visible in the eyepiece and display important information on LCD - I compiled in 500 brightest stars from HYGXYZ and full Messier catalog.  I have very little experience as amateur astronomer so far, so some of the objectives might have been not very obvious for me in the beginning. This project was also a good way to make use of my free time and gain experience in embedded system design.
     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
     
  11. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from CorB in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Progress:

    A summary of changes:
    instead of unipolar motor drivers, now I used a bipolar drivers very popular in RepRap projects, here A4988 (or DRV8825) 28byj-48 modified for bipolar cheap HC-05 for bluetooth SPP GPS module U-blox NEO-6m added RTC DS1307 to provide date/time reference even in the first seconds after power-on and 56 of NVRAM bytes added (optional) humidity and temperature sensor DSTH01 added a I2C socket to connect external temperature sensors to provide information about motors temperatures added PCF8574 for microstepping configuration of A4988 drivers added buzzer for audible indication added output for 12Vdc fan of main mirror - PWM controlled Nokia 5110 display replaced with a red back-light
     
    As the software is concerned, there were several improvements as well. The most important is that the motors are now driven by an interrupt driven AccelStepper
     

     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
  12. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from reaper7 in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Progress:

    A summary of changes:
    instead of unipolar motor drivers, now I used a bipolar drivers very popular in RepRap projects, here A4988 (or DRV8825) 28byj-48 modified for bipolar cheap HC-05 for bluetooth SPP GPS module U-blox NEO-6m added RTC DS1307 to provide date/time reference even in the first seconds after power-on and 56 of NVRAM bytes added (optional) humidity and temperature sensor DSTH01 added a I2C socket to connect external temperature sensors to provide information about motors temperatures added PCF8574 for microstepping configuration of A4988 drivers added buzzer for audible indication added output for 12Vdc fan of main mirror - PWM controlled Nokia 5110 display replaced with a red back-light
     
    As the software is concerned, there were several improvements as well. The most important is that the motors are now driven by an interrupt driven AccelStepper
     

     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
  13. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from PTB in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Progress:

    A summary of changes:
    instead of unipolar motor drivers, now I used a bipolar drivers very popular in RepRap projects, here A4988 (or DRV8825) 28byj-48 modified for bipolar cheap HC-05 for bluetooth SPP GPS module U-blox NEO-6m added RTC DS1307 to provide date/time reference even in the first seconds after power-on and 56 of NVRAM bytes added (optional) humidity and temperature sensor DSTH01 added a I2C socket to connect external temperature sensors to provide information about motors temperatures added PCF8574 for microstepping configuration of A4988 drivers added buzzer for audible indication added output for 12Vdc fan of main mirror - PWM controlled Nokia 5110 display replaced with a red back-light
     
    As the software is concerned, there were several improvements as well. The most important is that the motors are now driven by an interrupt driven AccelStepper
     

     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
  14. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from Rickta59 in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Progress:

    A summary of changes:
    instead of unipolar motor drivers, now I used a bipolar drivers very popular in RepRap projects, here A4988 (or DRV8825) 28byj-48 modified for bipolar cheap HC-05 for bluetooth SPP GPS module U-blox NEO-6m added RTC DS1307 to provide date/time reference even in the first seconds after power-on and 56 of NVRAM bytes added (optional) humidity and temperature sensor DSTH01 added a I2C socket to connect external temperature sensors to provide information about motors temperatures added PCF8574 for microstepping configuration of A4988 drivers added buzzer for audible indication added output for 12Vdc fan of main mirror - PWM controlled Nokia 5110 display replaced with a red back-light
     
    As the software is concerned, there were several improvements as well. The most important is that the motors are now driven by an interrupt driven AccelStepper
     

     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
  15. Like
    sq7bti reacted to simpleavr in [Group Buy-19][O] TMS0803/5 Emulating Calculator With Bubble Display   
    @@amstan
     
    Wow, these looks absolutely more "bubbly" than the sparkfun's. As in bubble led calculator projects, The more bubbly the more awesome.
     
    Why don't you show up earlier, Mr. amtan. 
     
    I had the code done more than 6 months ago and were trying out different displays that I can get hold of.
     
    Your's is larger and w/ them it will match the original calculators better as we can use 3 of them to make 9 digits.
     
    OTHO the sparkfun ones being smaller (4 digits in the same package as your 3 digits), w/ 8 digits + a lone led looks more compact and will fit within credit card size.
     
    In real operation though, the 1st digit is mostly used to sometimes show large (or fractional) negative values. For the TMS2500, it will also show over-flow conditions, I think w/ a "C".
     
    More likely turn out to be like this failed design on the left (because the 9 digit modules are faulty)
     

     
    I like them both.
     
    As I post I am still waiting for the V2 design (2 x 4 digits sparkfun). So I plan to finish a few of those w/ that parts I had ordered.
     
    Then I would really like to do another pcb design w/ your modules and to see how it comes out.
     
    May I suggest a trade between a V2 design built + tested and "some" of your 3 digit bubbles? This can happen in 2-3 weeks time in a Timmys as we are only an hour apart.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  16. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from GeekDoc in MSP430 Quadrotor ***attempt***   
    The first four looks like some web-mail referenced links. Just take a look at the beginning:
    https://mail.jbu.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=f89ce17e5c8847cea19d0f2fb00cbfae&URL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fitm%2F10DOF-IMU-HMC5883L-ITG3205-BMA180-BMP085-Sensor-Module-For-MWC-Arduino-%2F321180164174%3Fpt%3DLH_DefaultDomain_0%26hash%3Ditem4ac7d4604e  Great project by the way.
     
    s.
  17. Like
    sq7bti reacted to JBUKarl in MSP430 Quadrotor ***attempt***   
    Hello fellow bloggers!
    My name is Karl Anderson, I am a junior at John Brown University, studying electrical engineering. I have been working with a colleague, David Bird (also a junior EE major at JBU) on a quadrotor project for the past six weeks. Below you will find a table with the parts we used:
     
     
    Item
    Cost
    5g Brushless Motors * 4
    $34.92
    Turnigy Plush ESC 6A * 4
    $32.80
    10DOF Sensor Board
    $22.60
    Zippy 800 maH LiPo
    $4.42
    TX & RX
    $25.07
    Frame Tubing
    (window screen tubing)
    $3.24
    MSP430G2553 LaunchPad
    $9.99
    Propellors
    $3.49
    3.3V Regulator
    $1.95
    20 Pin DIP Socket
    $0.49
    20 Pin IC Breakout
    $2.49
    10k? Resistors * 3
    $0.00
    Jumper Wires
    $0.00
        Paid Total
    $98.23
    Complete Total
    $141.46
    Key: Paid/Donated
       
     
    And their links if purchased online:
    eBay
     
    Sensor:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/10DOF-IMU-HMC5883L-ITG3205-BMA180-BMP085-Sensor-Module-For-MWC-Arduino-/321180164174?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4ac7d4604e
     
    Props:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Buying-4pc-4025-4-x2-5-pitch-EP-Electric-Prop-Black-/360796268980?pt=Radio_Control_Parts_Accessories&hash=item54012229b4
     
    Hobby King
     
    Motors:
    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/%5F%5F34099%5F%5FhexTronik%5F5gram%5FBrushless%5FOutrunner%5F2000kv%5FUSA%5FWarehouse%5F.html
     
    ESC:
    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/%5F%5F30698%5F%5FTURNIGY%5FPlush%5F6A%5F8bec%5F6g%5FSpeed%5FController%5FUS%5FWarehouse%5F.html
     
    Battery:
    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__18646__ZIPPY_Flightmax_800mAh_2S1P_20C_US_Warehouse_.html
     (Had the charger for this battery already)
     
    RX & TX:
    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__9041__Hobby_King_2_4Ghz_6Ch_Tx_Rx_V2_Mode_1_.html
     
     
     
     
    The inspiration and foundation of our project was from another blogger, thanhTran, and below is a link to his completed project. We could not have gone as far as we did without him.
     
    http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1335765
     
    Our plan was first to use thanhTran
    FinalProjectBlogpost.pdf
  18. Like
    sq7bti reacted to Varol in i2c Explorer   
    Okay, I've gotten i2c_explorer compiled using mspgcc under Linux.
     
    There were some strange things going on with the compiled version in shell.c : handle_command and I had to remove the capability to generate repeated commands ( using ':' ), which I attribute to compiler issues with -Os optimization enabled.
     
    I have only used version 1.0 and it is working quite nicely now for me. But I was also able to compile version 1.1 after making the same changes there.
     
    You can download the source for both versions ( 1.0, and 1.1 ) from
    http://www.MovingSatellites.com/i2c_explorer.tar.gz
     
    And you can get the .elf file from
    http://www.MovingSatellites.com/i2c_explorer.elf
      ... Now on to fixing my 2231 i2c slave code ...
  19. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from bluehash in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Hello again,
     
    The hardware can be easily described with pin assignment, as most of the connections are straight forward:

    Software on the other hand comprises of the following modules:
    GPS - NMEA stream is parsed by TinyGPS++ LCD facilitated by SPI Sidereal time calculation - header file holds the Sidereal time for midnight each day precalculated to optimize execution AxesLib with help of AccelStepper provides interface to drive the mount around in azimuth and altitude coordinates, but also during start-up performs homing and calibration of mount (play estimation), CoordsLib performs transformation from and to equatorial coordinates using Taki matrix transformation PS - interrupt driven ps/2 handler - configures mouse hardware to provide incremental position information - unfortunately does not provide high resolution when compared to stepper motor movement, stars is using brightest stars from hygxyz.h for the three star alignment procedure during start-up. After that star library and messier object library is used to identify interesting object in view, LX200 implements communication protocol with all commands utilized by Stellarium, and most of the commands of Autostar protocol (Meade) scopectrl.tar.bz2
     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
     
  20. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from tripwire in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Hello everyone,
     
    There is a couple of similar projects available on the internet. Some of them base on Arduino and PIC performs very basic mount control without math intensive computation implemented in embedded controller. I decided to build my own with the following goals:
    ease of use by an inexperienced amateur astronomer (full automatic operation) precision and resolution of position  last but not least: the price Final, or better say at the moment, design comprises of the following components:
    Stellaris LM4F launchpad central control unit, two ULN2003 unipolar stepper motor driver chips, two 28byj-48 stepper motors one moving in azimuth, and in elevation via gear train, communication module: Bluetooth serial module. It allows sending a coordinate set-point and provides position feedback to Stellarium, GPS module providing position and precise time reference - PPS gives 1us accuracy, Nokia 5110 display unit and joystick for standalone operation, now obsolete mouse (PS/2) modified to provide independent (incremental) position information Resolution that was reached is a single step of approx. 5". Given the size of Jupiter to range from 30" to 50", this positioning resolution makes the view comfortably stable in standard 60° FOV eyepiece at reasonably high magnification, without the need to adjust AZ/ALT continuously.
     
    During the development I made use of several opensource and projects available online, namely:
    AccelStepper for stepper control, TinyGPS++ for NMEA decoding, Arduino telescope controller was my inspiration and reference for Taki's matrix method for coordinates transformation, of course Energia as my IDE Upon power-up the mount is performing:
    homing acquisition of current location (longitude/latitude) and time via NMEA stream moves to 3 brightest (most convenient) stars in succession to perform 3 star alignment procedure - they are selected from the list of over 500 stars in built-in catalog (the  brightest are used for the alignment, tough), once aligned the mount is in tracking mode: it tracks the view to counter the apparent movement of objects in the sky, waiting, either for the user to move to particular object - selected from the library of stars and Messier objects, or awaits connection via Bluetooth from a PC running Stellarium with a plugin and slews to selected object. search for the object that should be visible in the eyepiece and display important information on LCD - I compiled in 500 brightest stars from HYGXYZ and full Messier catalog.  I have very little experience as amateur astronomer so far, so some of the objectives might have been not very obvious for me in the beginning. This project was also a good way to make use of my free time and gain experience in embedded system design.
     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
     
  21. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from CorB in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Hello everyone,
     
    There is a couple of similar projects available on the internet. Some of them base on Arduino and PIC performs very basic mount control without math intensive computation implemented in embedded controller. I decided to build my own with the following goals:
    ease of use by an inexperienced amateur astronomer (full automatic operation) precision and resolution of position  last but not least: the price Final, or better say at the moment, design comprises of the following components:
    Stellaris LM4F launchpad central control unit, two ULN2003 unipolar stepper motor driver chips, two 28byj-48 stepper motors one moving in azimuth, and in elevation via gear train, communication module: Bluetooth serial module. It allows sending a coordinate set-point and provides position feedback to Stellarium, GPS module providing position and precise time reference - PPS gives 1us accuracy, Nokia 5110 display unit and joystick for standalone operation, now obsolete mouse (PS/2) modified to provide independent (incremental) position information Resolution that was reached is a single step of approx. 5". Given the size of Jupiter to range from 30" to 50", this positioning resolution makes the view comfortably stable in standard 60° FOV eyepiece at reasonably high magnification, without the need to adjust AZ/ALT continuously.
     
    During the development I made use of several opensource and projects available online, namely:
    AccelStepper for stepper control, TinyGPS++ for NMEA decoding, Arduino telescope controller was my inspiration and reference for Taki's matrix method for coordinates transformation, of course Energia as my IDE Upon power-up the mount is performing:
    homing acquisition of current location (longitude/latitude) and time via NMEA stream moves to 3 brightest (most convenient) stars in succession to perform 3 star alignment procedure - they are selected from the list of over 500 stars in built-in catalog (the  brightest are used for the alignment, tough), once aligned the mount is in tracking mode: it tracks the view to counter the apparent movement of objects in the sky, waiting, either for the user to move to particular object - selected from the library of stars and Messier objects, or awaits connection via Bluetooth from a PC running Stellarium with a plugin and slews to selected object. search for the object that should be visible in the eyepiece and display important information on LCD - I compiled in 500 brightest stars from HYGXYZ and full Messier catalog.  I have very little experience as amateur astronomer so far, so some of the objectives might have been not very obvious for me in the beginning. This project was also a good way to make use of my free time and gain experience in embedded system design.
     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
     
  22. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from igor in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Hello everyone,
     
    There is a couple of similar projects available on the internet. Some of them base on Arduino and PIC performs very basic mount control without math intensive computation implemented in embedded controller. I decided to build my own with the following goals:
    ease of use by an inexperienced amateur astronomer (full automatic operation) precision and resolution of position  last but not least: the price Final, or better say at the moment, design comprises of the following components:
    Stellaris LM4F launchpad central control unit, two ULN2003 unipolar stepper motor driver chips, two 28byj-48 stepper motors one moving in azimuth, and in elevation via gear train, communication module: Bluetooth serial module. It allows sending a coordinate set-point and provides position feedback to Stellarium, GPS module providing position and precise time reference - PPS gives 1us accuracy, Nokia 5110 display unit and joystick for standalone operation, now obsolete mouse (PS/2) modified to provide independent (incremental) position information Resolution that was reached is a single step of approx. 5". Given the size of Jupiter to range from 30" to 50", this positioning resolution makes the view comfortably stable in standard 60° FOV eyepiece at reasonably high magnification, without the need to adjust AZ/ALT continuously.
     
    During the development I made use of several opensource and projects available online, namely:
    AccelStepper for stepper control, TinyGPS++ for NMEA decoding, Arduino telescope controller was my inspiration and reference for Taki's matrix method for coordinates transformation, of course Energia as my IDE Upon power-up the mount is performing:
    homing acquisition of current location (longitude/latitude) and time via NMEA stream moves to 3 brightest (most convenient) stars in succession to perform 3 star alignment procedure - they are selected from the list of over 500 stars in built-in catalog (the  brightest are used for the alignment, tough), once aligned the mount is in tracking mode: it tracks the view to counter the apparent movement of objects in the sky, waiting, either for the user to move to particular object - selected from the library of stars and Messier objects, or awaits connection via Bluetooth from a PC running Stellarium with a plugin and slews to selected object. search for the object that should be visible in the eyepiece and display important information on LCD - I compiled in 500 brightest stars from HYGXYZ and full Messier catalog.  I have very little experience as amateur astronomer so far, so some of the objectives might have been not very obvious for me in the beginning. This project was also a good way to make use of my free time and gain experience in embedded system design.
     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
     
  23. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from spirilis in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Hello everyone,
     
    There is a couple of similar projects available on the internet. Some of them base on Arduino and PIC performs very basic mount control without math intensive computation implemented in embedded controller. I decided to build my own with the following goals:
    ease of use by an inexperienced amateur astronomer (full automatic operation) precision and resolution of position  last but not least: the price Final, or better say at the moment, design comprises of the following components:
    Stellaris LM4F launchpad central control unit, two ULN2003 unipolar stepper motor driver chips, two 28byj-48 stepper motors one moving in azimuth, and in elevation via gear train, communication module: Bluetooth serial module. It allows sending a coordinate set-point and provides position feedback to Stellarium, GPS module providing position and precise time reference - PPS gives 1us accuracy, Nokia 5110 display unit and joystick for standalone operation, now obsolete mouse (PS/2) modified to provide independent (incremental) position information Resolution that was reached is a single step of approx. 5". Given the size of Jupiter to range from 30" to 50", this positioning resolution makes the view comfortably stable in standard 60° FOV eyepiece at reasonably high magnification, without the need to adjust AZ/ALT continuously.
     
    During the development I made use of several opensource and projects available online, namely:
    AccelStepper for stepper control, TinyGPS++ for NMEA decoding, Arduino telescope controller was my inspiration and reference for Taki's matrix method for coordinates transformation, of course Energia as my IDE Upon power-up the mount is performing:
    homing acquisition of current location (longitude/latitude) and time via NMEA stream moves to 3 brightest (most convenient) stars in succession to perform 3 star alignment procedure - they are selected from the list of over 500 stars in built-in catalog (the  brightest are used for the alignment, tough), once aligned the mount is in tracking mode: it tracks the view to counter the apparent movement of objects in the sky, waiting, either for the user to move to particular object - selected from the library of stars and Messier objects, or awaits connection via Bluetooth from a PC running Stellarium with a plugin and slews to selected object. search for the object that should be visible in the eyepiece and display important information on LCD - I compiled in 500 brightest stars from HYGXYZ and full Messier catalog.  I have very little experience as amateur astronomer so far, so some of the objectives might have been not very obvious for me in the beginning. This project was also a good way to make use of my free time and gain experience in embedded system design.
     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
     
  24. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from dubnet in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Hello everyone,
     
    There is a couple of similar projects available on the internet. Some of them base on Arduino and PIC performs very basic mount control without math intensive computation implemented in embedded controller. I decided to build my own with the following goals:
    ease of use by an inexperienced amateur astronomer (full automatic operation) precision and resolution of position  last but not least: the price Final, or better say at the moment, design comprises of the following components:
    Stellaris LM4F launchpad central control unit, two ULN2003 unipolar stepper motor driver chips, two 28byj-48 stepper motors one moving in azimuth, and in elevation via gear train, communication module: Bluetooth serial module. It allows sending a coordinate set-point and provides position feedback to Stellarium, GPS module providing position and precise time reference - PPS gives 1us accuracy, Nokia 5110 display unit and joystick for standalone operation, now obsolete mouse (PS/2) modified to provide independent (incremental) position information Resolution that was reached is a single step of approx. 5". Given the size of Jupiter to range from 30" to 50", this positioning resolution makes the view comfortably stable in standard 60° FOV eyepiece at reasonably high magnification, without the need to adjust AZ/ALT continuously.
     
    During the development I made use of several opensource and projects available online, namely:
    AccelStepper for stepper control, TinyGPS++ for NMEA decoding, Arduino telescope controller was my inspiration and reference for Taki's matrix method for coordinates transformation, of course Energia as my IDE Upon power-up the mount is performing:
    homing acquisition of current location (longitude/latitude) and time via NMEA stream moves to 3 brightest (most convenient) stars in succession to perform 3 star alignment procedure - they are selected from the list of over 500 stars in built-in catalog (the  brightest are used for the alignment, tough), once aligned the mount is in tracking mode: it tracks the view to counter the apparent movement of objects in the sky, waiting, either for the user to move to particular object - selected from the library of stars and Messier objects, or awaits connection via Bluetooth from a PC running Stellarium with a plugin and slews to selected object. search for the object that should be visible in the eyepiece and display important information on LCD - I compiled in 500 brightest stars from HYGXYZ and full Messier catalog.  I have very little experience as amateur astronomer so far, so some of the objectives might have been not very obvious for me in the beginning. This project was also a good way to make use of my free time and gain experience in embedded system design.
     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
     
  25. Like
    sq7bti got a reaction from Rickta59 in Newtonian/Dobsonian telescope controller   
    Hello everyone,
     
    There is a couple of similar projects available on the internet. Some of them base on Arduino and PIC performs very basic mount control without math intensive computation implemented in embedded controller. I decided to build my own with the following goals:
    ease of use by an inexperienced amateur astronomer (full automatic operation) precision and resolution of position  last but not least: the price Final, or better say at the moment, design comprises of the following components:
    Stellaris LM4F launchpad central control unit, two ULN2003 unipolar stepper motor driver chips, two 28byj-48 stepper motors one moving in azimuth, and in elevation via gear train, communication module: Bluetooth serial module. It allows sending a coordinate set-point and provides position feedback to Stellarium, GPS module providing position and precise time reference - PPS gives 1us accuracy, Nokia 5110 display unit and joystick for standalone operation, now obsolete mouse (PS/2) modified to provide independent (incremental) position information Resolution that was reached is a single step of approx. 5". Given the size of Jupiter to range from 30" to 50", this positioning resolution makes the view comfortably stable in standard 60° FOV eyepiece at reasonably high magnification, without the need to adjust AZ/ALT continuously.
     
    During the development I made use of several opensource and projects available online, namely:
    AccelStepper for stepper control, TinyGPS++ for NMEA decoding, Arduino telescope controller was my inspiration and reference for Taki's matrix method for coordinates transformation, of course Energia as my IDE Upon power-up the mount is performing:
    homing acquisition of current location (longitude/latitude) and time via NMEA stream moves to 3 brightest (most convenient) stars in succession to perform 3 star alignment procedure - they are selected from the list of over 500 stars in built-in catalog (the  brightest are used for the alignment, tough), once aligned the mount is in tracking mode: it tracks the view to counter the apparent movement of objects in the sky, waiting, either for the user to move to particular object - selected from the library of stars and Messier objects, or awaits connection via Bluetooth from a PC running Stellarium with a plugin and slews to selected object. search for the object that should be visible in the eyepiece and display important information on LCD - I compiled in 500 brightest stars from HYGXYZ and full Messier catalog.  I have very little experience as amateur astronomer so far, so some of the objectives might have been not very obvious for me in the beginning. This project was also a good way to make use of my free time and gain experience in embedded system design.
     
    With kind regards,
    Szymon
     
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