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TheDirty

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  1. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from multivac in The Cramp! 430 powered desktop crane lamp   
    Thanks for sharing.  The video was great.
  2. Like
    TheDirty reacted to multivac in The Cramp! 430 powered desktop crane lamp   
    Hey guys, so I`ve been working on this project for a while now, and wanted to show it here because you are a cool bunch.
    if i mess up, the pics are too big, or  whatever, im sorry. let me know and ill fix it asap.
    the title is pretty explanatory so here are some pics of the thing, and the associated mess (if i actually manage to attach pictures correctly)



    i know there is nothing particularly interesting in this from the microcontroller point of view, but maybe someone will like it.
    its sort of based on a liebherr lr1750 crawler crane in case anyone is interested. it is controlled with an ir remote kindly donated to the project, mostly made from scrap from my junk bin and some chips i got from the VERY generous TI`s sample program. The base, for example, is made from an old hdd, and the hole thing is screwed to, and pivots around, the main bearing.




     
    Some stuff i had to buy though, like the leds.
    I was thinking what could I do with a lot of solid conductor wire i pulled from the walls in my house when i changed the [way too old] electrical installation. i thought a lattice structure would be fun, and i have to say, its amazing how rigid the thing got. i also wanted to do some switching led driver experimenting. I used a TI TPS61199 led driver with 32 "5050" leds, that have 3 chips per package, so its 96 leds in all, at 17 mA each. the leds are mounted on a structure that is supposed to resemble a section of Eero Saarinen`s twa flight center. a sort of rebar core type thingy for the roof.



    i wanted to do a solid thing for the lamp, but it proved somewhat hard, i still might though. I





  3. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from veryalive in First etch & surface mount!   
    I've helped a lot of people with this and all I can say once you get a method down you are golden, but even with the exact steps it takes experimentation and time to get it so it's quick and easy.  You may have to modify the steps to get things to work for you.  I started many years ago and got my process down.  For some people now it may not be worth it to go through the learning curve, but if I want to experiment with a board or just need a little add on, I can get a board from Eagle to etched and drilled in a couple hours when waiting for Seeed can take a month or more for 10 boards were I don't need 9 of them.
     
    For my steps I use:
    HP1012 printer and I still have the old Staples Glossy Photo paper that they don't sell anymore.
    I use a clothes iron to iron on the resist.
     
    My steps are:
    I'll print out the design on a regular piece of paper and cut it out. I use the cut out to cut a piece of copper clad to size.  File the edges down. I cut out a piece of the glossy paper just bigger than the design and tape it on a regular piece of paper. Print the design onto the glossy paper. Iron the design onto the board.  I use high heat.  Pressure and duration need to be experimented with.  I use a paper towel on the top to help make sure I don't get heat and pressure spots.  I don't know how to describe.  I use decent pressure and put it on for a minute or two.  Rub around and turn the board a few times while doing it to make sure you are doing the pressure evenly. Then need to scrub the paper off.  Let it soak first and then I use a toothbrush and my thumbs to get the paper off. Etch with warmed ferric chloride.  I just use the plastic sandwich boxes and drop the board in.  I rock it back and warm it over a desk light I have.  The light shines through and you can see the etching process and when all the copper has been removed because you can see through the board. Drill using a drill press I have.  You can get PCB sized drill bits from e-bay for cheap. Clean using acetone. ??? Profit I took pictures once when I was experimenting with the fab-in-a-box paper.  This paper does a total release of the laser toner and doesn't work as well for me.  The toner on its own doesn't make a great resist.  They sell a green film that you can use after to seal the toner better for a better etch, but I never got it to work properly.  They recommend a laminator to put it on though and I've never gone through the trouble of getting a laminator.
    http://higginstribe.com/uc/Stellaris/LM3S811/
     
    Modifications:
    The paper you use is the biggest variable.  The paper I use isn't available anymore and I don't know of any good replacements.  Many people use glossy magazine paper.  The super glossy and stiff kind you get in higher end magazines.
    Many people swear by the laminators.  I haven't needed one, but they are available cheap on e-bay and there are some recommended ones if you google around.
    Like I said before, I've had bad experiences with everything other than ferric chloride.  FC seems to be the most forgiving on resist.
     
    I use Eagle to design the board.  If you put all your tracks on the top layer (red) you will need to 'mirror' the board when printing.  If you put all your tracks on the bottom layer (blue) you don't mirror the board when printing.
  4. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from GeekDoc in First etch & surface mount!   
    My solder paste process.
     
    Cheap solder paste from DX.
    http://dx.com/p/lodestar-soldering-paste-50g-4711
     
    Syringe from DX.  (just search syringes there)
     
    18 gauge syringe tip from e-bay.  You can search them.  (maybe smaller gauge if you are doing smaller than 0603)
     
    I mix the solder paste with some no clean flux to the correct consistency and scoop it into the syringe.
     
    That's it.  I apply and use the hot air gun to set everything.
     
    Syringes and tips are one use only unless you can find a way to clean them.
    I use a hot glue gun to seal the tip of the syringe after every use and it keeps pretty well in the there.  A month or more.  Just make sure you don't get the glue inside the tip.
  5. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from GeekDoc in First etch & surface mount!   
    I've helped a lot of people with this and all I can say once you get a method down you are golden, but even with the exact steps it takes experimentation and time to get it so it's quick and easy.  You may have to modify the steps to get things to work for you.  I started many years ago and got my process down.  For some people now it may not be worth it to go through the learning curve, but if I want to experiment with a board or just need a little add on, I can get a board from Eagle to etched and drilled in a couple hours when waiting for Seeed can take a month or more for 10 boards were I don't need 9 of them.
     
    For my steps I use:
    HP1012 printer and I still have the old Staples Glossy Photo paper that they don't sell anymore.
    I use a clothes iron to iron on the resist.
     
    My steps are:
    I'll print out the design on a regular piece of paper and cut it out. I use the cut out to cut a piece of copper clad to size.  File the edges down. I cut out a piece of the glossy paper just bigger than the design and tape it on a regular piece of paper. Print the design onto the glossy paper. Iron the design onto the board.  I use high heat.  Pressure and duration need to be experimented with.  I use a paper towel on the top to help make sure I don't get heat and pressure spots.  I don't know how to describe.  I use decent pressure and put it on for a minute or two.  Rub around and turn the board a few times while doing it to make sure you are doing the pressure evenly. Then need to scrub the paper off.  Let it soak first and then I use a toothbrush and my thumbs to get the paper off. Etch with warmed ferric chloride.  I just use the plastic sandwich boxes and drop the board in.  I rock it back and warm it over a desk light I have.  The light shines through and you can see the etching process and when all the copper has been removed because you can see through the board. Drill using a drill press I have.  You can get PCB sized drill bits from e-bay for cheap. Clean using acetone. ??? Profit I took pictures once when I was experimenting with the fab-in-a-box paper.  This paper does a total release of the laser toner and doesn't work as well for me.  The toner on its own doesn't make a great resist.  They sell a green film that you can use after to seal the toner better for a better etch, but I never got it to work properly.  They recommend a laminator to put it on though and I've never gone through the trouble of getting a laminator.
    http://higginstribe.com/uc/Stellaris/LM3S811/
     
    Modifications:
    The paper you use is the biggest variable.  The paper I use isn't available anymore and I don't know of any good replacements.  Many people use glossy magazine paper.  The super glossy and stiff kind you get in higher end magazines.
    Many people swear by the laminators.  I haven't needed one, but they are available cheap on e-bay and there are some recommended ones if you google around.
    Like I said before, I've had bad experiences with everything other than ferric chloride.  FC seems to be the most forgiving on resist.
     
    I use Eagle to design the board.  If you put all your tracks on the top layer (red) you will need to 'mirror' the board when printing.  If you put all your tracks on the bottom layer (blue) you don't mirror the board when printing.
  6. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from tripwire in First etch & surface mount!   
    I've helped a lot of people with this and all I can say once you get a method down you are golden, but even with the exact steps it takes experimentation and time to get it so it's quick and easy.  You may have to modify the steps to get things to work for you.  I started many years ago and got my process down.  For some people now it may not be worth it to go through the learning curve, but if I want to experiment with a board or just need a little add on, I can get a board from Eagle to etched and drilled in a couple hours when waiting for Seeed can take a month or more for 10 boards were I don't need 9 of them.
     
    For my steps I use:
    HP1012 printer and I still have the old Staples Glossy Photo paper that they don't sell anymore.
    I use a clothes iron to iron on the resist.
     
    My steps are:
    I'll print out the design on a regular piece of paper and cut it out. I use the cut out to cut a piece of copper clad to size.  File the edges down. I cut out a piece of the glossy paper just bigger than the design and tape it on a regular piece of paper. Print the design onto the glossy paper. Iron the design onto the board.  I use high heat.  Pressure and duration need to be experimented with.  I use a paper towel on the top to help make sure I don't get heat and pressure spots.  I don't know how to describe.  I use decent pressure and put it on for a minute or two.  Rub around and turn the board a few times while doing it to make sure you are doing the pressure evenly. Then need to scrub the paper off.  Let it soak first and then I use a toothbrush and my thumbs to get the paper off. Etch with warmed ferric chloride.  I just use the plastic sandwich boxes and drop the board in.  I rock it back and warm it over a desk light I have.  The light shines through and you can see the etching process and when all the copper has been removed because you can see through the board. Drill using a drill press I have.  You can get PCB sized drill bits from e-bay for cheap. Clean using acetone. ??? Profit I took pictures once when I was experimenting with the fab-in-a-box paper.  This paper does a total release of the laser toner and doesn't work as well for me.  The toner on its own doesn't make a great resist.  They sell a green film that you can use after to seal the toner better for a better etch, but I never got it to work properly.  They recommend a laminator to put it on though and I've never gone through the trouble of getting a laminator.
    http://higginstribe.com/uc/Stellaris/LM3S811/
     
    Modifications:
    The paper you use is the biggest variable.  The paper I use isn't available anymore and I don't know of any good replacements.  Many people use glossy magazine paper.  The super glossy and stiff kind you get in higher end magazines.
    Many people swear by the laminators.  I haven't needed one, but they are available cheap on e-bay and there are some recommended ones if you google around.
    Like I said before, I've had bad experiences with everything other than ferric chloride.  FC seems to be the most forgiving on resist.
     
    I use Eagle to design the board.  If you put all your tracks on the top layer (red) you will need to 'mirror' the board when printing.  If you put all your tracks on the bottom layer (blue) you don't mirror the board when printing.
  7. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from JWoodrell in First etch & surface mount!   
    I've helped a lot of people with this and all I can say once you get a method down you are golden, but even with the exact steps it takes experimentation and time to get it so it's quick and easy.  You may have to modify the steps to get things to work for you.  I started many years ago and got my process down.  For some people now it may not be worth it to go through the learning curve, but if I want to experiment with a board or just need a little add on, I can get a board from Eagle to etched and drilled in a couple hours when waiting for Seeed can take a month or more for 10 boards were I don't need 9 of them.
     
    For my steps I use:
    HP1012 printer and I still have the old Staples Glossy Photo paper that they don't sell anymore.
    I use a clothes iron to iron on the resist.
     
    My steps are:
    I'll print out the design on a regular piece of paper and cut it out. I use the cut out to cut a piece of copper clad to size.  File the edges down. I cut out a piece of the glossy paper just bigger than the design and tape it on a regular piece of paper. Print the design onto the glossy paper. Iron the design onto the board.  I use high heat.  Pressure and duration need to be experimented with.  I use a paper towel on the top to help make sure I don't get heat and pressure spots.  I don't know how to describe.  I use decent pressure and put it on for a minute or two.  Rub around and turn the board a few times while doing it to make sure you are doing the pressure evenly. Then need to scrub the paper off.  Let it soak first and then I use a toothbrush and my thumbs to get the paper off. Etch with warmed ferric chloride.  I just use the plastic sandwich boxes and drop the board in.  I rock it back and warm it over a desk light I have.  The light shines through and you can see the etching process and when all the copper has been removed because you can see through the board. Drill using a drill press I have.  You can get PCB sized drill bits from e-bay for cheap. Clean using acetone. ??? Profit I took pictures once when I was experimenting with the fab-in-a-box paper.  This paper does a total release of the laser toner and doesn't work as well for me.  The toner on its own doesn't make a great resist.  They sell a green film that you can use after to seal the toner better for a better etch, but I never got it to work properly.  They recommend a laminator to put it on though and I've never gone through the trouble of getting a laminator.
    http://higginstribe.com/uc/Stellaris/LM3S811/
     
    Modifications:
    The paper you use is the biggest variable.  The paper I use isn't available anymore and I don't know of any good replacements.  Many people use glossy magazine paper.  The super glossy and stiff kind you get in higher end magazines.
    Many people swear by the laminators.  I haven't needed one, but they are available cheap on e-bay and there are some recommended ones if you google around.
    Like I said before, I've had bad experiences with everything other than ferric chloride.  FC seems to be the most forgiving on resist.
     
    I use Eagle to design the board.  If you put all your tracks on the top layer (red) you will need to 'mirror' the board when printing.  If you put all your tracks on the bottom layer (blue) you don't mirror the board when printing.
  8. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from tripwire in First etch & surface mount!   
    I do home etching fairly often.  The chinese cheapo prototype places are pretty sweet, but fairly often I just need a single board for something specific.  Usually just testing with a specific chip.  I do toner transfer and I've been doing it for years, so I've got the process pretty set down.
     
    I tried out the acid/peroxide solution a few times, but it's just too harsh.  It will cut through my resist and I get a lot of pitting.
     
    If you get bridges, just suck them up with some solder wick.
     

  9. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from Rickta59 in First etch & surface mount!   
    I do home etching fairly often.  The chinese cheapo prototype places are pretty sweet, but fairly often I just need a single board for something specific.  Usually just testing with a specific chip.  I do toner transfer and I've been doing it for years, so I've got the process pretty set down.
     
    I tried out the acid/peroxide solution a few times, but it's just too harsh.  It will cut through my resist and I get a lot of pitting.
     
    If you get bridges, just suck them up with some solder wick.
     

  10. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from spirilis in First etch & surface mount!   
    I do home etching fairly often.  The chinese cheapo prototype places are pretty sweet, but fairly often I just need a single board for something specific.  Usually just testing with a specific chip.  I do toner transfer and I've been doing it for years, so I've got the process pretty set down.
     
    I tried out the acid/peroxide solution a few times, but it's just too harsh.  It will cut through my resist and I get a lot of pitting.
     
    If you get bridges, just suck them up with some solder wick.
     

  11. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from cubeberg in Pogo Pins for testing & programming   
    Thanks for this and the link!  I've been looking for good pogo pins for a long time.
  12. Like
    TheDirty reacted to cubeberg in Pogo Pins for testing & programming   
    So recently I picked up 20 pogo pins from eBay - 10pcs P50-E2 Dia 0.68mm Length 16mm 75g Spring Test Probe Pogo Pin.  I've been using them to test out my relay boards without attaching headers.  
     
    They fit into female headers very nicely - and will absolutely fit through regular holes intended for headers.  They're nothing like the huge pins you see on Sparkfun.  I'm using them with a Rev 1.4 LP that already has female headers.
    They're working pretty well for testing right now - although getting them to fit into all of the holes is a little tricky sometimes.  Even though the pins are pretty snug in the headers, they move around a bit and a pin or two will end up not quite fitting into the whole.  It's usually pretty easy to fix - just nudge the pin a bit and it drops into place.  For a better testing jig - it's probably best to solder them into a board - I may make something small from OSHPark 
     
    The head of the pins is cone shaped and fits nicely into holes drilled for a header without going through - perfect for this type of setup.
     
    Thought you guys might enjoy some pictures!



  13. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from bluehash in the back of the board   
    The Energy Micro devel watch does this.  They have a QFP, crystal, caps, and the LCD connector mounted in holes in the board.
     
    Half way down.
    http://blog.energymicro.com/2012/12/12/make-a-slim-watch-with-arm-cortex-m3-efm32/
  14. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from cubeberg in the back of the board   
    The Energy Micro devel watch does this.  They have a QFP, crystal, caps, and the LCD connector mounted in holes in the board.
     
    Half way down.
    http://blog.energymicro.com/2012/12/12/make-a-slim-watch-with-arm-cortex-m3-efm32/
  15. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from jayshreekant in MSP430 Launchpad very very basic UART   
    To add to^
     
    http://www.ti.com/lsds/ti/microcontroller/16-bit_msp430/msp430_software_landing.page
     
    Go down the page to "Code Examples".  From there it will allow you to download peripheral code examples for a series of chips in either ASM or C.
  16. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from mbeals in First eagle board....would someone mind checking?   
    When you connect tracks to pins of a package that is not using your grid measurements, you should start the track from the actual pin, that way it is centred exactly on the pin and you move out from there.  If you are going pin to pin, start from one pin, go half way, and then restart on the other pin and connect in the middle.
     
    Usually you don't need a 5v level shifter for I2C.  Since it uses pullups and just sinks current you can use 3.3V pullups and it will work with 5V devices.
  17. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from jsolarski in Manchester decoding   
    I'm not certain if there is a question here or not, because the original question has already been answered.  If you want simple RF encoding, you can take it out of the virtualwire library.  They've updated their encoding scheme since I last saw it.
     
    Here's the conversion table and decode function:
    // 4 bit to 6 bit symbol converter table // Used to convert the high and low nybbles of the transmitted data // into 6 bit symbols for transmission. Each 6-bit symbol has 3 1s and 3 0s // with at most 3 consecutive identical bits static uint8_t symbols[] = { 0xd, 0xe, 0x13, 0x15, 0x16, 0x19, 0x1a, 0x1c, 0x23, 0x25, 0x26, 0x29, 0x2a, 0x2c, 0x32, 0x34 }; //----------------------------------------- // Encode the message into 6 bit symbols. Each byte is converted into // 2 6-bit symbols, high nybble first, low nybble second for (i = 0; i < len; i++) { crc = _crc_ccitt_update(crc, buf[i]); p[index++] = symbols[buf[i] >> 4]; p[index++] = symbols[buf[i] & 0xf]; }  
    The library encodes with crc inline with this code;  (buf gets converted to p)
     
    // Encode the message into 6 bit symbols. Each byte is converted into // 2 6-bit symbols, high nybble first, low nybble second for (i = 0; i < len; i++) { crc = _crc_ccitt_update(crc, buf[i]); p[index++] = symbols[buf[i] >> 4]; p[index++] = symbols[buf[i] & 0xf]; } // Append the fcs, 16 bits before encoding (4 6-bit symbols after encoding) // Caution: VW expects the _ones_complement_ of the CCITT CRC-16 as the FCS // VW sends FCS as low byte then hi byte crc = ~crc; p[index++] = symbols[(crc >> 4) & 0xf]; p[index++] = symbols[crc & 0xf]; p[index++] = symbols[(crc >> 12) & 0xf]; p[index++] = symbols[(crc >> 8) & 0xf];   
       
    VirtualWire:
    http://www.open.com.au/mikem/arduino/
  18. Like
    TheDirty reacted to oPossum in Post your LED Fader Code   
    #include <msp430.h> #include <stdint.h> void main(void) { WDTCTL = WDTPW | WDTHOLD; DCOCTL = 0; BCSCTL1 = CALBC1_16MHZ; DCOCTL = CALDCO_16MHZ; P1DIR = P1SEL = BIT6; TACCTL1 = OUTMOD_7; TACTL = TASSEL_2 | MC_2 | TAIE; _EINT(); } #pragma vector = TIMER0_A1_VECTOR __interrupt void timer_a1_isr(void) { static uint32_t x = 0x00100000L; static unsigned d = 1; TACCR1 = x >> 16; volatile unsigned z = TAIV; if(d) { x += (x >> 7); if(x > 0xF8000000L) d = 0; } else { x -= (x >> 7); if(x < 0x00200000L) d = 1; } }  
     
  19. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from cde in Sunrise Alarm (Atomic) Clock (fully featured)   
    I like this project as well.  I was thinking of making a Sunrise clock, but:
     
    I don't really need the atomic clock receiver.
    7 segment display rather than the LCD.
    Connect it to my sidetable lamp with a MOC3021 + TRIAC combo to ramp the lamp up rather than having LEDs in the clock itself.
  20. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from OhmMegaman in Another RGB LED Board   
    You should merge the copper plane with your ground net.
  21. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from jazz in SBW MSP430F550x based programmer   
    I assume this is what you want.
    Device Descriptor: bcdUSB: 0x0110 bDeviceClass: 0x00 bDeviceSubClass: 0x00 bDeviceProtocol: 0x00 bMaxPacketSize0: 0x08 (8) idVendor: 0x0451 (Texas Instruments) idProduct: 0xF432 bcdDevice: 0x0100 iManufacturer: 0x01 0x0409: "Texas Instruments" iProduct: 0x02 0x0409: "Texas Instruments MSP-FET430UIF" iSerialNumber: 0x03 0x0409: "24FF426C50144438" bNumConfigurations: 0x01 ConnectionStatus: DeviceConnected Current Config Value: 0x01 Device Bus Speed: Full Device Address: 0x03 Open Pipes: 5 Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x82 IN Transfer Type: Interrupt wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0xFF Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x03 OUT Transfer Type: Bulk wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0xFF Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x83 IN Transfer Type: Bulk wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0xFF Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x81 IN Transfer Type: Interrupt wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0x01 Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x01 OUT Transfer Type: Interrupt wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0x01 Configuration Descriptor: wTotalLength: 0x0055 bNumInterfaces: 0x02 bConfigurationValue: 0x01 iConfiguration: 0x00 bmAttributes: 0x80 (Bus Powered ) MaxPower: 0x32 (100 Ma) Interface Descriptor: bInterfaceNumber: 0x00 bAlternateSetting: 0x00 bNumEndpoints: 0x03 bInterfaceClass: 0x02 bInterfaceSubClass: 0x02 bInterfaceProtocol: 0x01 iInterface: 0x05 0x0409: "MSP430 Application UART" Unknown Descriptor: bDescriptorType: 0x24 bLength: 0x05 05 24 00 10 01 Unknown Descriptor: bDescriptorType: 0x24 bLength: 0x05 05 24 01 00 00 Unknown Descriptor: bDescriptorType: 0x24 bLength: 0x04 04 24 02 02 Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x82 IN Transfer Type: Interrupt wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0xFF Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x03 OUT Transfer Type: Bulk wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0xFF Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x83 IN Transfer Type: Bulk wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0xFF Interface Descriptor: bInterfaceNumber: 0x01 bAlternateSetting: 0x00 bNumEndpoints: 0x02 bInterfaceClass: 0x03 (HID) bInterfaceSubClass: 0x00 bInterfaceProtocol: 0x00 iInterface: 0x04 0x0409: "MSP430 Debug-Interface" HID Descriptor: bcdHID: 0x0101 bCountryCode: 0x00 bNumDescriptors: 0x01 bDescriptorType: 0x22 wDescriptorLength: 0x02B6 Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x81 IN Transfer Type: Interrupt wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0x01 Endpoint Descriptor: bEndpointAddress: 0x01 OUT Transfer Type: Interrupt wMaxPacketSize: 0x0040 (64) bInterval: 0x01
  22. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from zeke in Stellaris availability?   
    I used Stellaris before it was bought by TI and they are okay chips, but later Cortex-M3's have really overshadowed them. They have a huge parts list, but only a fraction of that list is stocked by suppliers and they are expensive now. Digikey has Plenty of Stellaris parts out there if you are interested and I think Newark was pretty good last time I checked. Just search for 'LM3S'.
  23. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from kaiosama in Big problem with my Launchpad   
    Don't connect 5V to VCC (the 3 pin connector), that's an unregulated power pin and should only be given supply voltage for the chip. I don't know the valueline chips that well, but I'm assuming 1.8V to 3.6V.
     
    I killed a chip recently putting 9V to it for an extended period and the chip itself is acting just as you are describing. Any voltage to the regular VCC just makes the chip hot. Have you tried using the other DIP that came with the launchpad? I'd put it in and plug it in, that will confirm it's not the target chip; or is.
     
    Check VCC with a multimeter as well to make sure it's within spec and not the cause of the problem.
     
    Sounds like just a bad board. If nothing works, I would just call the TI helpline. They might send you a replacement.
  24. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from NatureTM in Two questions on using CCS   
    If you go into the debug directory and find project-name.map Open that file and it contains a lot of information regarding the compile information including how much flash is used and not used.
     
    I'm not certain if the map file is created by default. You might need to go into the options to create it.
     
    Sorry, delayed response. I haven't been on in a while.
  25. Like
    TheDirty got a reaction from bluehash in MSP430F2274 TSSOP 38 Breakout board?   
    Ya, that touch pad looks awesome.
     
    I tend to make stand up boards now for all my uC breakouts. I also use a 4pin Spy-By-Wire connection for all my programming/debugging. I just realized, I don't actually have a picture of the working side.
     

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