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juani_c

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Posts posted by juani_c

  1. oh wow, this is great. This is working off of 9600 baud rate?

    Yes, I think someone mentions somewhere that 9600 is the max speed suported by the Launchpad

     

    Can you tell a bit more what Accelerometer chip you used and how did you connected to Launchpad?

    The accelerometer is a freescale MMA7361, (free sample) and is connected as follows;

     

    Pin

    5 Vss -> Gnd

    6 Vdd -> Vcc

    10 g-select -> Vcc

    7 Sleep -> Vcc

    13 Self test -> Vcc

    2 Xout -> ADC channel

    3 Yout-> ADC channel

  2. I checked for other DIP packages on EAGLE (Microchip, Analog Devices, etc) and they all are the same. I was looking this datasheet;

    http://focus.ti.com/lit/ml/mpdi002c/mpdi002c.pdf

    there you can see the 0,4" width at the tip of the pins and the 0,3" width near the CI body.

    I found this other as well;

    http://www.ece.tamu.edu/~jinyilee/ecen4 ... torial.pdf, in which you can read (Pg. 17):

    "For standard ICs (op-amps, logic, etc) the distance of spacing between the columns of pins is

    300 mil and between rows of pins it is 100 mil."

    I'll do some more research to find out how it should be done

  3. I have a library with G2X01, G2X11, G2X21,G2X31 devices. I copied and changed the symbols and packages from TI`s library so they look very similar. I haven't finish it yet, there are a couple of devices with QFN packages missing, but I guess most of us use DIP, so if you like I'II upload the file here if someone want to take it a look

  4. Thanks for the feedback guys!!!

    Do you get to shoot Zombies of a specific color? I guess the calibration is done at- startup.

    That's rigth. If you see the processing code you will notice a blue zombie that's not implemented, I had some problems identifing the three of them. The blue one had ADC values between the red and the gray zombie so I finally decided to remove it making easier the identification of the orher two.

    Although the project need some work I like the idea of interact with the screen with cheap sensor as LDR or photodiodes. While I was finishing this I saw on MAKE blog an article about a little board with a mcu and a light sensor that can be reprogrammed puting the board against the screen's monitor. It would be interesting to find more applications like that.

  5. Killing Zombies with the Launchpad

     

    Well, this is my entry for the November 2010 Project of the Month Contest. It is very simple and far less usefull than the others projects. The truth is that I wasn't participating until I saw the Chronos :D .So i had to come up with something easy and fast to develop. I was plaiyng arround with some leds and photodiodes in front of my pc monitor and I thought that cold be interesting to interact with the screen with the photodiodes or some other ligth sensor. that idea eventually ended up being a shooting game. I wasn't too sure what to shoot at but then i realized that the option was obvious; ZOMBIESS!!!. everybody like killing zombies.The circuit is very simple. the LDR is in a voltage divider with a 10K potentiometer. moving the potentiometer will help with the calibration.It has also a capacitor to stabilize the analog signal. the trigger is a switch in series with a resistor and a capacitor for debouncing. this swicth is in fact in parallel with S2 in the Launchpad so you could just use that one an reduce the number of needed parts. I just use my hand for the gun so I didn't have to make one (it also makes a great human machine interface :)).The source code for the MSP430 is basically the same as the "Snake game". every time you pull the trigger the ADC takes 16 samples and send the avarage to the computer. The analog signal is provided by the LDR. the LDR has a different response depending on the wavelength of the incident light (that`s the reason for the funky colors). it isn't very accurate, variations on the ambient light or in screen distance will lead to a misunderstanding between the zombies. Every time you pull the trigger and hit one of them you'll hear a shot and a zombie scream because, well, even zombies don

    LaunchPad-Zombies.rar

  6. Well, this is my entry for the November 2010 Project of the Month Contest. It is very simple and far less usefull than the others projects. The truth is that I wasn't participating until I saw the Chronos :D .So i had to come up with something easy and fast to develop. I was plaiyng arround with some leds and photodiodes in front of my pc monitor and I thought that cold be interesting to interact with the screen with the photodiodes or some other ligth sensor. that idea eventually ended up being a shooting game. I wasn't too sure what to shoot at but then i realized that the option was obvious; ZOMBIESS!!!. everybody like killing zombies.The circuit is very simple. the LDR is in a voltage divider with a 10K potentiometer. moving the potentiometer will help with the calibration.It has also a capacitor to stabilize the analog signal. the trigger is a switch in series with a resistor and a capacitor for debouncing. this swicth is in fact in parallel with S2 in the Launchpad so you could just use that one an reduce the number of needed parts. I just use my hand for the gun so I didn't have to make one (it also makes a great human machine interface :)).The source code for the MSP430 is basically the same as the "Snake game". every time you pull the trigger the ADC takes 16 samples and send the avarage to the computer. The analog signal is provided by the LDR. the LDR has a different response depending on the wavelength of the incident light (that`s the reason for the funky colors). it isn't very accurate, variations on the ambient light or in screen distance will lead to a misunderstanding between the zombies. Every time you pull the trigger and hit one of them you'll hear a shot and a zombie scream because, well, even zombies don

    LaunchPad-Zombies.rar

  7. Don't they only generate signal with pressure changes?

    yes indeed. i found that later...after destroying one :oops: assuming that more pressure was better :lol:

    after seeing the paper about the proyect i was talking about I realised that the way to do it was with a capacitor to store the voltage that the piezo generates, take a sample and discharge it. Perhaps in the future if I can get some piezos i'll try it out again

  8. Great work! I tried a similar thing in the past, but I was more interesting in using the piezos as pressure sensors instead of picking up sound (well, technically with sound it also sense the wave pressure...). I attend a bioengineering congress in wich some guys show how they hook up a bunch of these on an insole (i'm not sure if i'm using the right term here) in order to measure the foot preasure for gait analisys. It is a cheaper solution compared with comercial ones.

    At the end i had some problems with the signal, those things work great with sound but don't have a good behaviour with constant preassure, and I eventually quit it... :roll:

  9. I made this little project and wanted to share it. The code is mostly from "Half Duplex Software UART on the LaunchPad" by NJC, I just added the ADC parts I needed. The Processing application send first a "X" and the LP answer with the value from one of the axes, then send a "Y" and you get the value from the other axis. After that the soft update the snake position and repeat the process. In order to start the game you have to click on the START button (pretty obvious), you lose if the snake touchs any of the sides, also the length and speed increase as you eat the little boxes.

    The codes are far from perfect and can be improved. I'm making a little video (that actually took me almost the same amount of time I spent programming) and I'll upload it in a while.

     

     

    EDIT:here is the video

    Launchpad-Snake.rar

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