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zeke

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  1. Like
    zeke got a reaction from spirilis in Questions on SFP transceivers in hobbyist projects.   
    Oh!  
     
    <fires up Altium>
     
    I guess that means that there's a chance that I could beat you to the punch then!
     
    ;-)
  2. Like
    zeke got a reaction from spirilis in Questions on SFP transceivers in hobbyist projects.   
    The FPGA expert on our team took care of the VHDL programming while I designed the electronics.
     
    Our first version had a data rate of 640Mbps. The second version had a data rate of 1.2Gbps.
     
    At those speeds, the custom protocol needed to be enhanced with an 8b10b encoder in the VHDL code. That would enhance data reception by preventing excessive consecutive zero bits. The receiver would see nothing with many zeros because the light is off during a zero bit.
     
    It is my assumption that a 2Mbps data rate is slow enough that the 8b10b encoder would be overkill.
     
    Oh, the SFP modules have a speed rating. Get the ones that are rated for OC-3 or 155Mbps. The next speed option is OC-12 or 640Mbps. Also, make sure the SFP electrical interface is LVDS and not PECL.
     
    The key for getting my proposed interface working would be a software routine that would send a repetitive keep alive message on the optical link. The receivers need to stay in sync with each other. So just send a tick-tock message at a regular interval to keep the link up and the receivers synchronized.
     
    Thanks for keeping this thread alive. I keep forgetting to act on this design. I can see this hardware design working well because it is simple. It now looks like a software challenge to me.
  3. Like
    zeke got a reaction from farhan in I'm struggling with the CC3200   
    You've got me thinking about changing my direction away from TI-RTOS.
     
    I did a quick search and found some interesting leads with freeRTOS. I hope this doesn't sound like a sales pitch. It's just my preliminary research.
     
    There's books written for freeRTOS here: 
    http://shop.freertos.org/FreeRTOS_tutorial_books_and_reference_manuals_s/1825.htm
     
    Here's a video of a guy testing out freeRTOS successfully in CCS6:

     
    The TI wiki is pretty thin on details about freeRTOS support on the CC3200 as well:
    http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/CC32xx_FreeRTOS_Application
     
    I don't know how complete the port to the CC3200 is though. There doesn't seem to be any official support statement from freeRTOS.
     
    If I decide to use it, will I be writing all the device drivers thus completing the port to the CC3200?
     
    I must do some more research.
  4. Like
    zeke reacted to Fmilburn in It's Halloween Again   
    Here are my finished projects for the season...
     
    This is a princess tiara made from the wearable G2553 I posted above.  It drives 3 WS2812 "neopixels" on a tiara that I bought at the dollar store.  The WS2812 were ordered from Aliexpress and I find them difficult to solder up in a chain by hand.  I need to put together a jig or something to hold things in place and make it easier.

    All princesses need a magic wand and this one came with the tiara.  I cut out a star shape from some 4x6 cm 0.1" pitch PCB and soldered a blinking RGB LED, coin cell holder, and a tilt ball type switch to it.  The wand turns off when pointed down and on when lifted up while blinking different colors.  Because of bounce in the switch it kind of randomly blinks itself when shaken which is interesting.  I took a number of pictures to capture the 3 colors shown.

    The big project was the ferry boat.  Here is a photo of one of the many ferry boats that run in the Seattle area:

    I start by choosing a main box to work from and shape it.

    Then lay out more pieces to get an idea of what it will look like.

    Then cut to shape, glue everything up, and paint.  The electronics are more WS2812 and another G2553 wearable.  I had planned to add more electronic gizmos to this but ran out of time.  I guess that leaves me with something to do next year though.

    My grandson has been helping a bit.  He is really into Lego.  He built this pumpkin and then we put an LED into that is just taped to a coin cell.

    Finally, some satisfied customers at the local fall festival parade...


  5. Like
    zeke reacted to NurseBob in LIS2DH12 connected to MSP430FR5739   
    I ran across this youtube video which may provide a resource:
  6. Like
    zeke reacted to NurseBob in LIS2DH12 connected to MSP430FR5739   
    the LIS2DH12 supports both I2C and SPI communication interfaces.  You've noted your board is using the SPI interface, so examples for basic SPI communication with a sensor would be the place to start. The LIS2DH12 docs will inform on the messages from the device, which your FR device will need to decode. You may find some hints in the ST Microelectronics GUI documentation for their demo board that works with the LIS2DH12
    www.st.com/resource/en/user_manual/dm00024991.pdf
     
    Additional docs are here:
     
    http://www.st.com/content/st_com/en/products/evaluation-tools/product-evaluation-tools/mems-motion-sensor-eval-boards/steval-mki109v2.html
  7. Like
    zeke reacted to yyrkoon in Beaglebone-Web-PMIC-Register-Viewer   
    Here is a screenshot for those that are curious, but may not care to actually go through the whole process just to see what the app does.
    https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMBlgvnVeue7SdioEo06_P2Zox_Hp3Q45noSM3tgIaL_3K2epj3FVE3neoQr0aiMQ/photo/AF1QipOSqWNV4ScwkHesOxO22l4WboYHcxfOiavjUGdP?key=cWVUeEl6djdZQlhvUl9yMDEwNGpFLTdLbURRUFpR
  8. Like
    zeke reacted to carlb in MSP-EXP432P401R Pre-Production (black PCB) LaunchPad to be Phased Out   
    I replaced all of mine (about 5 minutes of work each). I've confirmed that blinky works.
  9. Like
    zeke reacted to greeeg in Mailbag   
    It's weird that they do that, given that I believe it all comes from digikey's warehouse.
     


    I just got a new (to me) air filter (a purex fumecube 2). and I bought a Hakko Fume extractor nozzle to pair with it.
    Hakko obviously wasn't designed for the Purex and didn't fit....so I had an excuse to 3d print an adapter + cap.
     
    Already love it, it's great being able to look right over your work and not have to worry about flux smoke. The Hakko arm moves around easily but stays pretty rigid as you can see.
    I'm sure future me will be grateful in avoiding smoke damage to my lungs.
  10. Like
    zeke reacted to RobG in MSP430 Nixie Clock   
    Time to upgrade my Nixie clock.
    Here's what's new:
    1. the number one complaint about my current version is battery, or lack of it, done. The new version will come with backup battery.
    2. hour and minute divider (colon,) done. Added two INS-1 Nixie tubes. 
    3. improved HV power supply, it is now more efficient and quieter.
    Few other tiny improvements.
     
    Should be ready for holiday season.
     

     
  11. Like
    zeke reacted to Fmilburn in edX course Real-Time bluetooth Networks - Shape the World   
    The course started yesterday and the content of the first couple of videos is very familiar .  I haven't gotten very far but I am not sure it is going to be what I thought it would be.
     
    Separately I received my CC2650 BoosterPack module in the mail today - which will be used in the course.  I need to figure out something to do with that second module.  In the photo below the module soldered on the BoosterPack is far left.  The module PCB blends in with the BoosterPack PCB so it is hard to tell the size.  At bottom right the second module that comes in the box is flipped upside down to show the pins - scale in cm.
     

     
     
  12. Like
    zeke reacted to D^2 in Uart configurator   
    There's also an online calculator that also provides oversampling config as well as error rates for each setting:
    Link[FIXED]
  13. Like
    zeke got a reaction from NurseBob in PCB Calculator Programs   
    I thought we should have a post that we collect useful PCB guidelines, tips, tricks and calculators in.
     
    Here's some contributions:
     
    1. UltraCad's PCB Calculators and Tools
    2. Saturn PCB Design Toolkit
    3. High Speed USB Platform Design Guidelines
    4. Dave Jones' PCB Layout Tutorial
    5. TI's PCB Design Guidelines For Reduced EMI
    6. Altera's High-Speed Board Layout Guidelines
    7. SMPS' Power Supply PCB Design Guidelines
    8. Maxim's General Layout Guidelines for RF and Mixed-Signal PCBs
    9. High Voltage PCB Design
    10. Op Amps for Everyone - Chapter 17: Circuit Board Layout Techniques
     
    I think I touched on most of the important design topics. Low noise A2D pcb design is one I didn't track down yet.
  14. Like
    zeke reacted to bluehash in Who is using rPI ?   
    Understandable.
    Code is here: https://github.com/rszimm/sprinklers_pi/wiki (I did not write it)
    I wanted something that I can setup quickly and is highly configurable and it works reliably, because my plants would not like it otherwise... and it has.
    I ssh it into it every week to make sure all is well and hope to add more home automation functionality in the future. The only time it has gone down in the last 2 months is due to a power blip and it did not boot up well.
    It looks at the current weather(temp, humidity, rainfall).. and uses an equation to figure out the water requirement... pretty cool.
     
    The Wifi on board is a god send.. USB ports are free and nothing sticking out of it. 
  15. Like
    zeke got a reaction from agaelema in CCS for $9.99   
    The Node Lock uses the MAC address of a LAN adapter in your computer.
     
    So, I just bought a USB WiFi adapter and assigned its MAC address to the CCS license. Now I can move CCS around with my WiFi adapter.
  16. Like
    zeke got a reaction from Fmilburn in CCS for $9.99   
    The Node Lock uses the MAC address of a LAN adapter in your computer.
     
    So, I just bought a USB WiFi adapter and assigned its MAC address to the CCS license. Now I can move CCS around with my WiFi adapter.
  17. Like
    zeke reacted to Rickta59 in CCS for $9.99   
    The big deal? Ask any hobbyist that purchased a node locked CCS license at full price.  I think most of them paid at least $500 and then a yearly fee for maintenance.  The TI compilers for the msp430 and msp432 are better supported by the CCS project wizards. Also, TI support tends to pay more attention to problems and testing with TI compiler vs the included GCC versions.  The CCS compilers tend to produce better optimized code compared to the GCC compilers.  However, now that TI is maintaining the msp430-elf-gcc, the example code is often written to work with both the TI compilers and the GCC versions. This didn't used to be the case.
     
    I was lucky 4 years ago to take advantage of a previous promo to obtain a CCS license.  They had offered a C2000 Piccolo stick bundled with CCS for $30.  This is the first time they have offered something like this since then.
     
    You might ask @@NurseBob how he feels!  I think he is one of the few who has ponied up real money for a license.
     
    -rick
  18. Like
    zeke got a reaction from roadrunner84 in RANT: Cloud of this, IoT of that . . .   
    Ten years ago, IoT used to be labeled M2M or machine to machine. It was a fad as well.
     
    It's crazy how marketing can make me feel like my work is worthless unless I implement "that one killer feature".
     
    I think it's best for me to ignore the false sense of inadequacy and just be awesome at doing and making the things that I like.
  19. Like
    zeke reacted to dubnet in Temperature & Humidity sensor -with LCD & RF   
    Excellent project and I really like the overall design (features, board design, etc.)
     
    Regarding the strange curve after transmit.  Is it possible that the RF itself may be interfering with the current measurement by inducing a small charge into the measurement circuit itself?
  20. Like
    zeke reacted to greeeg in GPS logger for a local Beagle club   
    Polyurethane parts have come up nicely.
     

     
    Main advantages of this method of rapid prototyping
    Part cost is low these use about $0.05 of polyurethane resin. Parts can easily be coloured using dyes. (as demonstrated) Very little time needed for each cast (about 5 minutes) 1-2 Hour cure time 1-1 replica to original part. Of course you need to invest the time and money to make the silicone molds to begin with. So for a single part 3d printing is often the preferred approach.
     


     
    The parts are a perfect fit over the button and LEDs.
     

     
     
  21. Like
    zeke got a reaction from spirilis in I like government surplus stores   
    @@spirilis
     
    Here's what I found in your state:
    HP Laserjet 8550DN HP Laserjet 5 A lot of HP printers There's a large format printer in this listing
  22. Like
    zeke reacted to yyrkoon in I like government surplus stores   
    We have a laserjet 5si, that was rebuilt by my buddy. I think he paid $130 for it, and $100 of that was for shipping( off ebay ). Then a few years later he bought another one for $40 and picked it up in person. The one we're currently using does 11x17 paper too, and has a duplexer as well.
     
    And yeah . . . 11"x17" schematics are nice. Picture below of what it looks like, but that particular one in the picture is not ours.
     
    http://img.clasf.pk/2014/03/25/HP-Laserjet-5Si-A3-A4-size-High-Volume-Printer-20140325131817.jpg
  23. Like
    zeke got a reaction from pine in I like government surplus stores   
    I really like government surplus stores. I mean, reeeeeeally like them.
     
    This week, I bought two HP laserjet printers:
    A Laserjet 5000n which can print 11"x17" and that is great for schematics, and A Laserjet 4350dnt which has the duplexer and a second 500 sheet paper tray. I know I didn't steal them because I have a bill of sale. The total for both printers was $30!
     
    I also got a Fellowes Powershred C-320 paper shredder. That thing can swallow 25 sheets of paper at a time and will not choke!  I paid $80 for it.
     
    So, yeah, I like this government surplus stuff.
  24. Like
    zeke got a reaction from yyrkoon in I like government surplus stores   
    I really like government surplus stores. I mean, reeeeeeally like them.
     
    This week, I bought two HP laserjet printers:
    A Laserjet 5000n which can print 11"x17" and that is great for schematics, and A Laserjet 4350dnt which has the duplexer and a second 500 sheet paper tray. I know I didn't steal them because I have a bill of sale. The total for both printers was $30!
     
    I also got a Fellowes Powershred C-320 paper shredder. That thing can swallow 25 sheets of paper at a time and will not choke!  I paid $80 for it.
     
    So, yeah, I like this government surplus stuff.
  25. Like
    zeke got a reaction from cubeberg in I like government surplus stores   
    I really like government surplus stores. I mean, reeeeeeally like them.
     
    This week, I bought two HP laserjet printers:
    A Laserjet 5000n which can print 11"x17" and that is great for schematics, and A Laserjet 4350dnt which has the duplexer and a second 500 sheet paper tray. I know I didn't steal them because I have a bill of sale. The total for both printers was $30!
     
    I also got a Fellowes Powershred C-320 paper shredder. That thing can swallow 25 sheets of paper at a time and will not choke!  I paid $80 for it.
     
    So, yeah, I like this government surplus stuff.
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