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zeke

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  1. Like
    zeke got a reaction from nickds1 in Implementing an I2C slave device.   
    This is my approach to state machines. Your mileage may vary.
    Determine all of the sub-systems that you will want to service Commands, Controls and Inputs, User Interface, and Data Setup a system tick timer that fires its interrupt on a regular consistent basis. This system doesn't have to go into LPM4. If it does then periodically wake up the system and cycle through the software service loops then go back to sleep. Setup a series of service flags that are set during the interrupt service routine and cleared after being serviced: Flag(s) for Commands, Flag(s) for Controls and Inputs, Flag(s) for User Interface, and Flag(s) for Data Setup a variable that acts like the system timer odometer. Every Odometer == (DesiredInterval%ServiceFlag_n_now) set the ServiceFlag_n Decide how often you will service the other functional blocks of your code. For example, Update the 2x20 LCD display every one second, or Update the Serial Console every 250ms, or Retrieve the Temperature from a sensor every 15 minutes. Setup an Interrupt Service Routine to catch any characters coming into the Serial Port Buffer. Stuff them into the Input Ring Buffer Set a flag that there's something to service. In the main loop, scan all of the service flags to see if any are set. Call the servicing function for each set flag. Clear the service flag at the end of that process. Configure the program to repeat continuously until Kingdom Come.
    I've left out significant details about setting up all of the peripherals and general variables so don't forget to do that stuff.
    This is just the basic gist of my state machines on a bare metal level.
  2. Like
    zeke got a reaction from Fmilburn in Implementing an I2C slave device.   
    I have done both of these tasks for more than one client.
    The 1-Wire protocol speed ends up being about 15kHz, which is slow but reliable. It's really cool to see on an scope though.
    I developed the I2C slave code using the sample TI code as the starting point.
    Here are the research materials that I referred to while writing my I2C code:
    http://www.nxp.com/documents/application_note/AN10216.pdf http://www.nxp.com/documents/user_manual/UM10204.pdf http://i2c.info/i2c-bus-specification http://www.ti.com/lit/an/slva704/slva704.pdf My slave code just follows the logic of the transaction.
  3. Like
    zeke got a reaction from yyrkoon in Implementing an I2C slave device.   
    I have done both of these tasks for more than one client.
    The 1-Wire protocol speed ends up being about 15kHz, which is slow but reliable. It's really cool to see on an scope though.
    I developed the I2C slave code using the sample TI code as the starting point.
    Here are the research materials that I referred to while writing my I2C code:
    http://www.nxp.com/documents/application_note/AN10216.pdf http://www.nxp.com/documents/user_manual/UM10204.pdf http://i2c.info/i2c-bus-specification http://www.ti.com/lit/an/slva704/slva704.pdf My slave code just follows the logic of the transaction.
  4. Like
    zeke got a reaction from Rickta59 in Implementing an I2C slave device.   
    I have done both of these tasks for more than one client.
    The 1-Wire protocol speed ends up being about 15kHz, which is slow but reliable. It's really cool to see on an scope though.
    I developed the I2C slave code using the sample TI code as the starting point.
    Here are the research materials that I referred to while writing my I2C code:
    http://www.nxp.com/documents/application_note/AN10216.pdf http://www.nxp.com/documents/user_manual/UM10204.pdf http://i2c.info/i2c-bus-specification http://www.ti.com/lit/an/slva704/slva704.pdf My slave code just follows the logic of the transaction.
  5. Like
    zeke got a reaction from bluehash in Implementing an I2C slave device.   
    I have done both of these tasks for more than one client.
    The 1-Wire protocol speed ends up being about 15kHz, which is slow but reliable. It's really cool to see on an scope though.
    I developed the I2C slave code using the sample TI code as the starting point.
    Here are the research materials that I referred to while writing my I2C code:
    http://www.nxp.com/documents/application_note/AN10216.pdf http://www.nxp.com/documents/user_manual/UM10204.pdf http://i2c.info/i2c-bus-specification http://www.ti.com/lit/an/slva704/slva704.pdf My slave code just follows the logic of the transaction.
  6. Like
    zeke reacted to Fmilburn in Energia sensor code and library examples   
    I'm attaching a link to github with Energia code examples for various sensors.  I started this as a place to put examples for students in a course I was helping to develop for middle and high school level students using the MSP430F5529.  Unfortunately the course was not held but I'm putting them out there in the hope they might help someone.  Where the code has been tested with other LaunchPads I've noted it.
     
    Here it is:  https://github.com/fmilburn3?tab=repositories
     
    You won't find anything sophisticated    but many are at least somewhat unique in that I couldn't find an example for that sensor tailored specifically for the F5529, or I wanted to better document it for beginners.  Essentially all are variants of work done by others, including work on 43oh, and I hope I've recognized the contribution in the code.  There is a wiki associated with some that has the schematic and photographs.  There is some other example code that is almost complete - e.g. using small DC motors and servos and I might add them.  Here is a list of sensors and devices currently out there:
    CNY70 - used as a proximity switch CNY70 - used as a tachometer MCP41010 - digital pot HC-SR04 - distance sensor 3 watt high intensity LED MAX4466 -sound level I2C LCD (4x20) and (2x16) HC-SR501 - PIR movement detection SW-180xxP - vibration sensor Joystick PFatFs - compiles and runs on the F5529 Hall effect rainfall sensor TMP36 - temperature Sharp GPf1S53VJ000F - photo interrupter Using low power modes (LPM) in Energia TCS3200 Color Sensor using MSP432           *** added 8/8/15 DS1307 Real Time Clock (RTC) Module         *** added 8/9/15 INA125P Instrumentation Amplifier                *** added 10/9/15 MCP3008 ADC                                            *** added 10/12/15 TLC5615 DAC                                              *** added 11/30/15 dAISy MarineTraffic shore station w/ CC3200  ** added 12/16/15 AD9850 Frequency Generator                        ** added 1/20/16 FFT                                                             ** added 1/20/16 Rotary encoder                                            ** added 1/23/16 W5500 Ethernet                                          ** added 3/25/16 MSP430G2955 pins_energia.h                   ** added 3/25/16 DriverLib examples for F5529                     ** added 8/16 Infrared Transmission                                ** added 12/16 WS2812 LEDs using SPI                          ** added 12/16 Battery measurement                               ** added 1/17 Finite State Machine - alarm system          ** added 2/6/17 Using RTC module with Energia - F5529     ** added 2/24/17 RCWL-0516 "doppler radar microwave motion sensor module"     ** added 6/6/17 Vary time a LED stays lit with potentiometer  ** added 7/8/17
  7. Like
    zeke reacted to bluehash in 20170311 - Upgrade   
    Hello Everyone,
    Thanks for being patient while the forums were being fixed and upgraded. One Friday morning(March 10th, 2017), the server went down. There was a memory issue, which stalled the SQL server and everything came to halt. 
    it had been fixed by Friday night,  but then went down again due to a mistake I made during the bringup. In the mean time, I also decided to try to upgrade the server(php and peripheral updates) as well as the forum software. I'm going to see how things plan out in the next couple of days.
    Any issues you see with the site, please reply to this thread.
    Thanks!
  8. Like
    zeke got a reaction from LIJsselstein in Telemetry for embedded systems   
    @@LIJsselstein,
     
    I don't have any specific reason for singling out this repository.
     
    A long time ago, in another job, I was writing C code for the Z80. The micro had to talk with the on-board metering system of a gigantic mining truck. The protocol used was called PLM2. It has since upgraded to PLM3. It turns out that it is too complex of a protocol for my tinkering.
     
    So, I went on the hunt for source code examples which demonstrated packetized communication between the PC and a micro. Specifically, I was hunting for source code examples in python that showed me how to work with structures of packets.
     
    Eventually, I would like to have a PC program that creates a SCADA like interface to my micro projects. I want to issue commands to the micro and receive back lots of data.  It seemed to me that this pytelemetry was a convenient example to consider.
     
    Do you have other source code examples that you would like to share with us?
      I was on the hunt for source code examples which demonstrated packetized communication between the PC and a micro. 
     
  9. Like
    zeke got a reaction from bluehash in Telemetry for embedded systems   
    Hi EveryBody!
     
    I came across three software libraries on github that I thought I would share:
    pytelemetry telemetry pytelemetrycli  
    pytelemetry provides high-level communication with any embedded device for remote control and monitoring. Specifically, pytelemetry implements a custom communication protocol, based on the PubSub (Publish/Subscribe) messaging pattern.   telemetry is the C implementation of the protocol. It can run on any embedded system, along with official distributions for Arduino and ARM Mbed.   pytelemetrycli is a powerful command line interface to interact with embedded devices using the protocol. It enables instant data visualization of any received data, full logging of communications, health monitoring of the serial port and much more.   It looks like the libraries have been developed for the mbed and the arduino so far.   I've got these on my "to play with" bucket list.   YMMV
  10. Like
    zeke got a reaction from Rei Vilo in Telemetry for embedded systems   
    Hi EveryBody!
     
    I came across three software libraries on github that I thought I would share:
    pytelemetry telemetry pytelemetrycli  
    pytelemetry provides high-level communication with any embedded device for remote control and monitoring. Specifically, pytelemetry implements a custom communication protocol, based on the PubSub (Publish/Subscribe) messaging pattern.   telemetry is the C implementation of the protocol. It can run on any embedded system, along with official distributions for Arduino and ARM Mbed.   pytelemetrycli is a powerful command line interface to interact with embedded devices using the protocol. It enables instant data visualization of any received data, full logging of communications, health monitoring of the serial port and much more.   It looks like the libraries have been developed for the mbed and the arduino so far.   I've got these on my "to play with" bucket list.   YMMV
  11. Like
    zeke got a reaction from dubnet in Telemetry for embedded systems   
    Hi EveryBody!
     
    I came across three software libraries on github that I thought I would share:
    pytelemetry telemetry pytelemetrycli  
    pytelemetry provides high-level communication with any embedded device for remote control and monitoring. Specifically, pytelemetry implements a custom communication protocol, based on the PubSub (Publish/Subscribe) messaging pattern.   telemetry is the C implementation of the protocol. It can run on any embedded system, along with official distributions for Arduino and ARM Mbed.   pytelemetrycli is a powerful command line interface to interact with embedded devices using the protocol. It enables instant data visualization of any received data, full logging of communications, health monitoring of the serial port and much more.   It looks like the libraries have been developed for the mbed and the arduino so far.   I've got these on my "to play with" bucket list.   YMMV
  12. Like
    zeke reacted to lalo630 in IoT robotic car using the CC3200 and Blynk app   
    We finally got this tracked car running. The tension still needs to be adjusted.
     
    Here is the video:
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4bw3NqG9tWWQzhIRmVXN2JGdXM
     
     
     Next step is to mount the hardware and start programming.
  13. Like
    zeke reacted to maelli01 in micropower microvoltmeter with MSP430FR4133 and MCP3422 ADC   
    Weekend-project:
    Autoranging microvoltmeter based on the MSP430FR4133 launchpad.
    ADC used: MIcrochip MCP3422, an 18bit, 3.75 sample/second Sigma Delta with 2 differential inputs. I2C interface
    This nice little chip contains a programmable amplifier (x2,x4,x8) and a not-too-bad internal reference of 2.048V.
    Max input range is +/-2.048V, resolution (8x amplified) is 2uV.
     
    Hand-etched a single layer PCB which goes on top of Launchpad.
     
     

    Type K cable in hot water: 2.93mV, 73Kelvin temp difference to ambient
     
     

    compare with my Fluke 289, 0.06% (datasheet says 0.05% typical, 0.35% max)
    Not too shabby for a chip that costs 3 bucks.
     
     

    Current consumption: on average <40uA, the whole setup would run 5000hours from a CR2032
    The ADC does 1 sample/second and sleeps the rest of the time, the MSP430 does what it likes the most: sleep in LPM3
     
     
    Code is not a big deal, quick hack based on the FR4133 examples, for the LCD and for the I2C interface 
    //microvolt meter with MCP3422 and MSP430FR413 //****************************************************************************** #include <msp430.h> #define LCDMEMW ((int*)LCDMEM) #define pos1 4 // Digit A1 - L4 #define pos2 6 // Digit A2 - L6 #define pos3 8 // Digit A3 - L8 #define pos4 10 // Digit A4 - L10 #define pos5 2 // Digit A5 - L2 #define pos6 18 // Digit A6 - L18 const char digit[10] ={ 0xFC, // "0" 0x60, // "1" 0xDB, // "2" 0xF3, // "3" 0x67, // "4" 0xB7, // "5" 0xBF, // "6" 0xE0, // "7" 0xFF, // "8" 0xF7 // "9" }; volatile long voltage; unsigned long dvoltage; unsigned char TXByteCtr; unsigned char TXData; unsigned char newgain,gain; void Clear_LCD(){ int i; for(i=5;i;i--) LCDMEMW[i]=0; LCDMEMW[9]=0; } int main( void ) { WDTCTL = WDTPW | WDTHOLD; // Stop watchdog timer P1OUT = 0x00;P2OUT = 0x00;P3OUT = 0x00;P4OUT = 0x00; P5OUT = 0x00;P6OUT = 0x00;P7OUT = 0x00;P8OUT = 0x00; P1DIR = 0xFF;P2DIR = 0xFF;P3DIR = 0xFF;P4DIR = 0xFF; P5DIR = 0xFF;P6DIR = 0xFF;P7DIR = 0xFF;P8DIR = 0xFF; P5SEL0 |= BIT2 | BIT3; // I2C pins // Configure XT1 oscillator P4SEL0 |= BIT1 | BIT2; // P4.2~P4.1: crystal pins do { CSCTL7 &= ~(XT1OFFG | DCOFFG); // Clear XT1 and DCO fault flag SFRIFG1 &= ~OFIFG; } while (SFRIFG1 & OFIFG); // Test oscillator fault flag // Disable the GPIO power-on default high-impedance mode // to activate previously configured port settings PM5CTL0 &= ~LOCKLPM5; CSCTL4 = SELMS__DCOCLKDIV + SELA__XT1CLK; // MCLK=SMCLK=DCO; ACLK=XT1 // Configure RTC RTCCTL |= RTCSS__XT1CLK | RTCIE; // Initialize RTC to use XT1 and enable RTC interrupt RTCMOD = 16384; // Set RTC modulo to 16384 to trigger interrupt twice a second // Configure LCD pins SYSCFG2 |= LCDPCTL; // R13/R23/R33/LCDCAP0/LCDCAP1 pins selected LCDPCTL0 = 0xFFFF; LCDPCTL1 = 0x07FF; LCDPCTL2 = 0x00F0; // L0~L26 & L36~L39 pins selected LCDCTL0 = LCDSSEL_0 | LCDDIV_7; // flcd ref freq is xtclk // LCD Operation - Mode 3, internal 3.08v, charge pump 256Hz LCDVCTL = LCDCPEN | LCDREFEN | VLCD_5 | (LCDCPFSEL0 | LCDCPFSEL1 | LCDCPFSEL2 | LCDCPFSEL3); LCDMEMCTL |= LCDCLRM; // Clear LCD memory LCDCSSEL0 = 0x000F; // Configure COMs and SEGs LCDCSSEL1 = 0x0000; // L0, L1, L2, L3: COM pins LCDCSSEL2 = 0x0000; LCDM0 = 0x21; // L0 = COM0, L1 = COM1 LCDM1 = 0x84; // L2 = COM2, L3 = COM3 LCDCTL0 |= LCD4MUX | LCDON; // Turn on LCD, 4-mux selected (LCD4MUX also includes LCDSON) Clear_LCD(); // Configure USCI_B0 for I2C mode UCB0CTLW0 |= UCSWRST; // Software reset enabled UCB0CTLW0 |= UCMODE_3 | UCMST | UCSYNC; // I2C mode, Master mode, sync UCB0CTLW1 |= UCASTP_2; // Automatic stop generated // after UCB0TBCNT is reached UCB0BRW = 0x0008; // baudrate = SMCLK / 8 UCB0I2CSA = 0x0068; // Slave address UCB0CTL1 &= ~UCSWRST; UCB0IE |= UCRXIE | UCNACKIE | UCBCNTIE | UCTXIE0; while(1){ // P1OUT |= BIT0; TXByteCtr = 1; // Load TX byte counter TXData = 0x8C+gain; while (UCB0CTLW0 & UCTXSTP); // Ensure stop condition got sent UCB0CTLW0 |= UCTR | UCTXSTT; // I2C TX, start condition // P1OUT &= ~BIT0; __bis_SR_register(LPM3_bits | GIE); // timer will wake me up // P1OUT |= BIT0; UCB0TBCNT = 0x0003; // 3 bytes to be received voltage=0; UCB0CTLW0 &= ~UCTR; while (UCB0CTL1 & UCTXSTP); // Ensure stop condition got sent UCB0CTL1 |= UCTXSTT; // I2C start condition __bis_SR_register(LPM3_bits | GIE); // I2C irq will wake me up voltage<<=8; // shift to left corner to do the sign correctly voltage/=32; // calibration is done here: 2048 in an ideal world if ((voltage<400000)&&(voltage>(-400000))){ // autoranging, downshift if (newgain<3) newgain++; } if ((voltage>1000000)||(voltage<-1000000)){ // autoranging, upshift if (newgain) newgain--; } voltage>>=gain; gain=newgain; if ((voltage<500000)&&(voltage>-500000)){ voltage*=10; //low range LCDMEM[11]&=~1; //adjust decimal point LCDMEM[9]|=1; } else{ //high range LCDMEM[9]&=~1; //adjust decimal point LCDMEM[11]|=1; } voltage*=25; voltage/=128; if (voltage<0) {dvoltage=-voltage; LCDMEM[5]|=4 ;} //negative else {dvoltage= voltage; LCDMEM[5]&=~4;} //positive LCDMEM[pos1] = digit[(dvoltage / 100000)%10]; LCDMEM[pos2] = digit[(dvoltage / 10000)%10]; LCDMEM[pos3] = digit[(dvoltage / 1000)%10]; LCDMEM[pos4] = digit[(dvoltage / 100)%10]; LCDMEM[pos5] = digit[(dvoltage / 10)%10]; LCDMEM[pos6] = digit[dvoltage % 10]; // P1OUT &= ~BIT0; __bis_SR_register(LPM3_bits | GIE); // timer will wake me up } } #pragma vector = RTC_VECTOR __interrupt void RTC_ISR(void){ switch(__even_in_range(RTCIV, RTCIV_RTCIF)){ case RTCIV_NONE: break; // No interrupt case RTCIV_RTCIF: // RTC Overflow __bic_SR_register_on_exit(LPM3_bits); break; default: break; } } #pragma vector = USCI_B0_VECTOR __interrupt void USCIB0_ISR(void){ switch(__even_in_range(UCB0IV, USCI_I2C_UCBIT9IFG)){ case USCI_NONE: break; // Vector 0: No interrupts case USCI_I2C_UCALIFG: break; // Vector 2: ALIFG case USCI_I2C_UCNACKIFG: // Vector 4: NACKIFG UCB0CTL1 |= UCTXSTT; // I2C start condition break; case USCI_I2C_UCSTTIFG: break; // Vector 6: STTIFG case USCI_I2C_UCSTPIFG: break; // Vector 8: STPIFG case USCI_I2C_UCRXIFG3: break; // Vector 10: RXIFG3 case USCI_I2C_UCTXIFG3: break; // Vector 14: TXIFG3 case USCI_I2C_UCRXIFG2: break; // Vector 16: RXIFG2 case USCI_I2C_UCTXIFG2: break; // Vector 18: TXIFG2 case USCI_I2C_UCRXIFG1: break; // Vector 20: RXIFG1 case USCI_I2C_UCTXIFG1: break; // Vector 22: TXIFG1 case USCI_I2C_UCRXIFG0: // Vector 24: RXIFG0 voltage=(voltage<<8)+UCB0RXBUF; break; case USCI_I2C_UCTXIFG0: // Vector 26: TXIFG0 if (TXByteCtr){ // Check TX byte counter UCB0TXBUF = TXData; // Load TX buffer TXByteCtr--; // Decrement TX byte counter } else{ UCB0CTLW0 |= UCTXSTP; // I2C stop condition UCB0IFG &= ~UCTXIFG; // Clear USCI_B0 TX int flag } break; case USCI_I2C_UCBCNTIFG: // Vector 28: BCNTIFG __bic_SR_register_on_exit(LPM3_bits); break; case USCI_I2C_UCCLTOIFG: break; // Vector 30: clock low timeout case USCI_I2C_UCBIT9IFG: break; // Vector 32: 9th bit default: break; } }
  14. Like
    zeke got a reaction from bluehash in DSO138 - Oscilloscope Kit   
    I found this DSO138 oscilloscope kit on HobbyKing today.
     
    It may be of use to some people out there who do have a limited test equipment budget.
     
    From what I can tell, it looks like you have to solder in all of the through hole parts to complete the build. And I think the processor comes pre-programmed.
     
    I don't own one of these. I just thought it was a cool and inexpensive tool for only $20.
  15. Like
    zeke got a reaction from jazz in DSO138 - Oscilloscope Kit   
    I found this DSO138 oscilloscope kit on HobbyKing today.
     
    It may be of use to some people out there who do have a limited test equipment budget.
     
    From what I can tell, it looks like you have to solder in all of the through hole parts to complete the build. And I think the processor comes pre-programmed.
     
    I don't own one of these. I just thought it was a cool and inexpensive tool for only $20.
  16. Like
    zeke reacted to yyrkoon in Open Source Books that teach C Programming   
    I will add that, I do not know of the others, they look like they'd be good reads, but the Beej guide to( anything ) is not what I'd consider a good "book". I've read through several of his online books, relating to interprocess communications, and networking. Neither of those two topics were very well written, and the content is old. e.g. the content is outdated.
     
    I will also add that LDD( Linux Device drivers ) while in hard copy format is a paid book. The author felt compelled to make the book available free online: http://www.xml.com/ldd/chapter/book/ The third edition I believe is also available for free online here: https://lwn.net/Kernel/LDD3/. free electrons also seems to have a single pdf file version, but i have not looked into it.
     
    Anyway LDD2 is a very good book if you need to understand Linux device driver, I paid for a hard copy and have not regretted it.
     
    For C++, these are supposed to be pretty good as well: http://mindview.net/Books/TICPP/ThinkingInCPP2e.html, but they are dated.
  17. Like
    zeke got a reaction from NurseBob in Open Source Books that teach C Programming   
    I stumbled across a list of nine open source books on Hacker News today that will help people learn how to program in C.
     
    YMMV
  18. Like
    zeke got a reaction from dutyfree in Issue with transforming from port2 to port1   
    Welcome @@dutyfree!
     
    There is a lot of small details that could go wrong when you change from Port1 to Port2.
     
    Could you do use a favor and post your code so we can see what you are doing?
     
    Please use the little blue <> symbol when you are posting your code in your reply message. That will make the code look nice for us to see.
  19. Like
    zeke got a reaction from yyrkoon in Open Source Books that teach C Programming   
    I stumbled across a list of nine open source books on Hacker News today that will help people learn how to program in C.
     
    YMMV
  20. Like
    zeke reacted to Fmilburn in Introduction to Finite State Machines   
    I recently became interested in Finite State Machines and ended up writing a tutorial which has been posted on the 43oh blog:  http://43oh.com/2017/02/how-to-implement-finite-state-machines-using-energia/
     
    The example uses Energia but adapting it to C / C++ for use with Code Composer Studio or other IDEs would be simple.  While conceptually easy, working through the details and applying the concepts in a more structured manner were instructive for me.  The tutorial is just an introduction but there are additional references at the bottom.  If you are aware of other good resources feel free to post them below.
  21. Like
    zeke got a reaction from veryalive in Open Source Books that teach C Programming   
    I stumbled across a list of nine open source books on Hacker News today that will help people learn how to program in C.
     
    YMMV
  22. Like
    zeke got a reaction from oPossum in Open Source Books that teach C Programming   
    I stumbled across a list of nine open source books on Hacker News today that will help people learn how to program in C.
     
    YMMV
  23. Like
    zeke got a reaction from yyrkoon in For Sale: Clock ring (APA102 based)   
    @@yyrkoon,
     
    Check out the linki @@timotet posted.
     
    The way I describe this LED is that it's an addressable RGB LED that uses a one way protocol SPI-like protocol.
     
    Each LED emitter inside the unit consumes up to 20mA of current for a grand total of about 60ma when the color White is commanded.
     
    The refresh speed appears to be quite quick - faster than the common WS2812 RGB LED anyways.
     
    I believe I have the SPI configured for an unrealisticly high speed of 8MHz and the LEDs are working, mostly. In my test code, the last LED's Red element glows slightly. I beleive if I were to slow down the SPI port then that artifact would go away.
     
     
    My motivation for making these rings was to push myself forward to learn new skills with Altium, MSP430s and to make a clock that my kids would enjoy having in their rooms.
     
    My motivation for offering these units for sale is to gauge the interest of you all in this technology. Not many people seem interested therefore I can conclude that this design is a dud i.e.: It's just a clock.
     
    I am considering a completely different kid friendly design using these LEDs where I will use a standard sized picture frame and install a single board matrix of APA102Cs that can display pretty much anything your creative mind can come up with.  I'm still doing a feasability study on that design.
     
    Feel free to ask questions.
  24. Like
    zeke reacted to lalo630 in What are you doing right now..?   
    I'm working on an IoT car using the cc3200 and the blynk apphttps://vimeo.com/201243722
     
    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
  25. Like
    zeke reacted to yyrkoon in What is "our" time worth ?   
    I think this job will keep me busy for a while. So, I do not think I'll be doing any work for anyone else while that holds true. My needs are rather modest . . .and I'll be meeting the company owner face to face very soon. Flown across the country to meet with the guy, to talk about the future of the systems software, etc. As well as play with their test bed.
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