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eskimobob

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Posts posted by eskimobob


  1. Ok, got it working - I had set a couple of breakpoints in main.  Out of frustration, having tried everything else, I removed all breakpoints and relaunched and it worked ok - I can now add the breakpoints back in and all seems fine.  No idea what was wrong but something was screwy.


  2. My OLIMEX-JTAG-ISO seems to be dead but fortunately I have a MK2 version.  I've not used it for debugging before and when I come to play with it this morning, I am getting an error message that I remember getting in the dim and distant past - unfortunately I can't remember how I solved it before on the MK1 model.

     

    _reset_vector__() at crt0.S:118 0x1100

    Can't find a source file at "/home/pf/git/msp430eclipse/dk.xpg.msp430eclipse/scripts/src/gcc/libgcc/config/msp430/crt0.S"
     

    I had to upgrade my Eclipse plugin (from Ver1 to Ver3) and toolchain - everything compiles just fine.

     

    Weirdly when I try to debug an old project, that does not show this problem - i.e. it just stops at main() as expected and yet it does not have a crt0.S file anywhere.

     

    If anyone can point me in the right direction that would be much appreciated.


  3. I've used an MSP430-JTAG-ISO for years and been very happy with it.  Used mainly with mpsdebug through Eclipse on Linux however also used via IAR in Windows.

     

    Come to use it today and couldn't seem to get it debugging correctly - no reason to think the MSP430-JTAG-ISO is faulty because I was programming units fine with it a few days ago so it's probably something daft I had set wrong.  While experimenting to figure it out, I tried programming some code with the Olimex Windows software and it said that it was upgrading the unit firmware which was fair enough - I let it get on and do it.

     

    Unfortunately from that moment onwards, I can't talk to the device whatsoever.  It shows up on USB in Linux quite happily and enumerates in Windows as expected however MSPDebug reports "olimex_iso: timed out while receiving data" - only the red led flashes, the green led is never on.  Trying the same thing in IAR causes the red light to flash rapidly and IAR seems to hang.

     

    Is this goosed or is there some way to recover it??

     

    I do have an MSP430-JTAG-ISO-MK2 but it's in the office and I'm away for a few days - arghh :-(


  4. So how is it going now ? Did you get it working, or have you moved on to other things for now ? I just did a Samba share last night but for a different purpose( to share my local worpress wp-contents directory to a local Windows machine for theme development)

     

    Samba seems to be very much straight forward now compared to the last time I used it. Install a couple of packages, edit the smb.conf file, and issue smbpasswd -a <username>. Bam! done. Of course for windows 7 it seems to me necessary to prefix the share with the computer name you're cocnnecting to when connecting( Because Windows 7 when not on a Domain, automatically adds the computer name as the local domain for the computer - when not using simple file sharing, which really sucks) Either way its something that is fairly trivial and in my own case easy to live with.

     

    It's working fine on Ubuntu, I am very happy with it :-)  

     

    I have been investigating relative costs of the different cloud storage options - since I have just under 250GB of data to store, I know I have to pay or else split the data into endless different accounts - since my aim is for secure backup of commercial data, I am happy to pay once I find a suitable cloud service.  Not all of them support rsync and since I want this to be entirely automatic, that's a requirement.


  5. You know, I can not help but wonder if a whole file system is required for this. I mean there has to be another way to encrypt files on Linux ? I really do not know but . . . yeah.

     

    I can sympathise with what you are saying but having seen it in action, it is very slick.

     

    There is in reality only one copy of the files (the encrypted copy) on the disk.  If I try and write a file to the unencrypted mount point, the file system grabs it and encrypts it automatically then saves to disk.  Similarly, when I try and read a file from the unencrypted mount point, the file system intervenes, decrypts the corresponding disk file and makes it available to me.  All this is done transparently and with no noticeable delay  B)


  6. Ok, I gave up...  well, almost :P

     

    Since I was having endless problems getting it to build on Angstrom, I decided instead to try installing a BBB Ubuntu (13.04) image instead.  That was surprisingly easy to do and once booted, I was able to simply do:

     

    sudo apt-get install encfs

     

    and it worked like a charm - it downloaded the package and all dependencies and installed perfectly.

     

    I can now happily attach an external USB hard drive and use encfs to create a transparently encrypted folder - bingo B)

     

    Remaining tasks:

    1) setup a Samba share so I can access the drive across my network

    2) setup a cron job to do a daily rsync of the encrypted folder system to the cloud

     

    Longer term I would like to get it working on Angstrom since Angstrom boots significant faster than Ubuntu!

     

    As it happens, I have used the ldd command to get a list of the dependent shared libraries so I could in theory copy those across to my Angstrom distribution - the only problem there is that the Ubuntu distribution uses hard float whereas I'm pretty sure the Angstrom image uses soft float...


  7. It's probably bad form to reply to my own post :rolleyes: but I've just made a bit of progress so better post to save others wasting time.

     

    After inspecting the configure script, it seemed like it was not actually really complaining that it could not find libfuse.a but that it could not find libfuse full stop.  I therefore recompiled fuse so that I create libfuse.so and then tried compiling encfs again specifying LDFLAGS to point to the shared object file and this time it does fine the library.

     

    I now get a different error message:

    
    
    configure: error: cannot run test program while cross compiling
    

    off to investigate that now...

     

    EDIT

     

    it seems that the configure script does not handle well the testing of tools when cross compiling.  The recommendation was to either create a new configure script (sounds like a big job) or else edit the configure script to remove the specific test that is failing.  Since I know the fuse lib I have made is never than that required, I have simply removed the test.

     

    I now get through the entire configure process without problems and can move on to make.

    Make started complaining about not having RLog so I have downloaded and built that successfully.

     

    Getting lots of compile errors now though so plodding on - too late tonight, will have to resume another night...


  8. I've got an interest in LinuxCNC, I use it on a desktop machine to control a small milling machine (Denford Triac).  It works brilliantly but I'd love to do away with the tower PC in favour of a BBB.  Must find some time to experiment with their latest efforts :)


  9. I want to use a BBB to make myself a custom backup device which will automatically encrypt files and periodically upload to a cloud or remote server via rsync.

     

    Sounds reasonable to me but I'm struggling to get EncFS to compile.  I'm cross compiling on xubuntu using the arm-linux-gnueabi toolchain.

     

    When I run ./configure, I keep getting "Can't find libfuse.a - add the search path to LDFLAGS" despite having already compiled fuse and created libfuse.a.  I have also tried setting the LDFLAGS to point to the libfuse.a file but it refuses to find it.

     

    This is the latest in a long line of stumbling blocks - one of the biggest was getting the boost libraries to compile.

     

    Before I spend more hours on it, I thought I'd post here in case one of you will immediately say I am wasting my time.

     

    Output of my configure attempt below:

    martin@martin-PBLaptop:~/Documents/Technical/BeagleBoneBlack/encfs/encfs-1.7.4$ ./configure --host=arm-linux-gnueabi --with-boost-libdir=/home/martin/Documents/Technical/BeagleBoneBlack/boost/boost_1_54_0/stage/lib
    configure: WARNING: if you wanted to set the --build type, don't use --host.
        If a cross compiler is detected then cross compile mode will be used
    checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
    checking whether build environment is sane... yes
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-strip... arm-linux-gnueabi-strip
    checking for a thread-safe mkdir -p... /bin/mkdir -p
    checking for gawk... gawk
    checking whether make sets $(MAKE)... yes
    checking build system type... x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu
    checking host system type... arm-unknown-linux-gnueabi
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-g++... arm-linux-gnueabi-g++
    checking whether the C++ compiler works... yes
    checking for C++ compiler default output file name... a.out
    checking for suffix of executables... 
    checking whether we are cross compiling... yes
    checking for suffix of object files... o
    checking whether we are using the GNU C++ compiler... yes
    checking whether arm-linux-gnueabi-g++ accepts -g... yes
    checking for style of include used by make... GNU
    checking dependency style of arm-linux-gnueabi-g++... gcc3
    checking whether NLS is requested... yes
    checking for msgfmt... /usr/bin/msgfmt
    checking for gmsgfmt... /usr/bin/msgfmt
    checking for xgettext... /usr/bin/xgettext
    checking for msgmerge... /usr/bin/msgmerge
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc... arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc
    checking whether we are using the GNU C compiler... yes
    checking whether arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc accepts -g... yes
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc option to accept ISO C89... none needed
    checking dependency style of arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc... gcc3
    checking for ld used by GCC... /usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld
    checking if the linker (/usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld) is GNU ld... yes
    checking for shared library run path origin... done
    checking for CFPreferencesCopyAppValue... no
    checking for CFLocaleCopyCurrent... no
    checking for GNU gettext in libc... yes
    checking whether to use NLS... yes
    checking where the gettext function comes from... libc
    checking how to print strings... printf
    checking for a sed that does not truncate output... /bin/sed
    checking for grep that handles long lines and -e... /bin/grep
    checking for egrep... /bin/grep -E
    checking for fgrep... /bin/grep -F
    checking for ld used by arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc... /usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld
    checking if the linker (/usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld) is GNU ld... yes
    checking for BSD- or MS-compatible name lister (nm)... /usr/bin/arm-linux-gnueabi-nm -B
    checking the name lister (/usr/bin/arm-linux-gnueabi-nm - interface... BSD nm
    checking whether ln -s works... yes
    checking the maximum length of command line arguments... 1572864
    checking whether the shell understands some XSI constructs... yes
    checking whether the shell understands "+="... yes
    checking for /usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld option to reload object files... -r
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-objdump... arm-linux-gnueabi-objdump
    checking how to recognize dependent libraries... pass_all
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-ar... arm-linux-gnueabi-ar
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-strip... (cached) arm-linux-gnueabi-strip
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-ranlib... arm-linux-gnueabi-ranlib
    checking command to parse /usr/bin/arm-linux-gnueabi-nm -B output from arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc object... ok
    checking how to run the C preprocessor... arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc -E
    checking for ANSI C header files... yes
    checking for sys/types.h... yes
    checking for sys/stat.h... yes
    checking for stdlib.h... yes
    checking for string.h... yes
    checking for memory.h... yes
    checking for strings.h... yes
    checking for inttypes.h... yes
    checking for stdint.h... yes
    checking for unistd.h... yes
    checking for dlfcn.h... yes
    checking for objdir... .libs
    checking if arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc supports -fno-rtti -fno-exceptions... no
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc option to produce PIC... -fPIC -DPIC
    checking if arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc PIC flag -fPIC -DPIC works... yes
    checking if arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc static flag -static works... yes
    checking if arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc supports -c -o file.o... yes
    checking if arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc supports -c -o file.o... (cached) yes
    checking whether the arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc linker (/usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld) supports shared libraries... yes
    checking whether -lc should be explicitly linked in... no
    checking dynamic linker characteristics... GNU/Linux ld.so
    checking how to hardcode library paths into programs... immediate
    checking whether stripping libraries is possible... yes
    checking if libtool supports shared libraries... yes
    checking whether to build shared libraries... yes
    checking whether to build static libraries... no
    checking how to run the C++ preprocessor... arm-linux-gnueabi-g++ -E
    checking for ld used by arm-linux-gnueabi-g++... /usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld
    checking if the linker (/usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld) is GNU ld... yes
    checking whether the arm-linux-gnueabi-g++ linker (/usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld) supports shared libraries... yes
    checking for arm-linux-gnueabi-g++ option to produce PIC... -fPIC -DPIC
    checking if arm-linux-gnueabi-g++ PIC flag -fPIC -DPIC works... yes
    checking if arm-linux-gnueabi-g++ static flag -static works... yes
    checking if arm-linux-gnueabi-g++ supports -c -o file.o... yes
    checking if arm-linux-gnueabi-g++ supports -c -o file.o... (cached) yes
    checking whether the arm-linux-gnueabi-g++ linker (/usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/bin/ld) supports shared libraries... yes
    checking dynamic linker characteristics... (cached) GNU/Linux ld.so
    checking how to hardcode library paths into programs... immediate
    checking for the pthreads library -lpthreads... no
    checking whether pthreads work without any flags... no
    checking whether pthreads work with -Kthread... no
    checking whether pthreads work with -kthread... no
    checking for the pthreads library -llthread... no
    checking whether pthreads work with -pthread... yes
    checking for joinable pthread attribute... PTHREAD_CREATE_JOINABLE
    checking if more special flags are required for pthreads... no
    checking for cc_r... arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc
    checking for boostlib >= 1.34... yes
    checking whether the Boost::System library is available... yes
    checking for exit in -lboost_system... yes
    configure: WARNING: BOOST_CPPFLAGS -I/usr/include
    checking whether the Boost::Serialization library is available... yes
    checking for exit in -lboost_serialization... yes
    checking whether the Boost::Filesystem library is available... yes
    checking for exit in -lboost_filesystem... yes
    checking fuse.h usability... yes
    checking fuse.h presence... yes
    checking for fuse.h... yes
    checking for fuse_new in -lfuse_ino64... no
    checking for fuse_new in -lfuse... no
    configure: error: 
    	    Can't find libfuse.a - add the search path to LDFLAGS
    	    and rerun configure, eg:
    	    export LDFLAGS=-L/usr/local/lib 
    
    

  10. Hi, I'm Martin.  I've been playing with the BBB for a month or so now and just keep thinking of new uses for it  ;)

    My embedded linux experience is limited but improving all the time.

    Currently trying to get EncFS working on the BBB but will post about that in a more appropriate thread.


  11. Anaren offers a target board with 433 MHz and MSP-430 that plugs into TI's EZ430-RF2500 dev kit. Take a look at Anaren's AIR modules and look for the A1101R04C. You will also need an antenna from Anaren (66089-0406). The AIR modules are available from Arrow and Mouser worldwide, and Avnet in North America.

     

    Thanks Geof :thumbup:

    They look interesting - I see they are stating (Coming Spring 2012!) - not long...


  12. I wish I'd gone for one of the higher frequency models.

     

    Ditto :roll:

     

    We can start a group buy for this. There is already a current gb for the CC2500 from the same vendor. We'll be able to combine and save on shipping if many people are interested. I can also buy and keep some in the shop.

     

    Hmmm - that is interesting...

    I didn't realise the 2.4GHz modules would be cheaper than the 433MHz modules??

    I don't need 2.4GHz but since they are also suitable for worldwide use I could potentially use it instead - I did have a play with an ezRF2500 dev kit last year - need to refresh my memory. I am guessing these are not likely to come with any FCC/CE approvals :problem:

     

    Will have a think and get back to your over the weekend 8-)


  13. Thanks for your response. I was hoping someone would point out something I had missed but sadly not :cry:

    I had seen the Olimex module before but had discounted it because of frequency - perhaps I should rethink.

     

    I agree it is a shame and it seems short sighted of TI - I think TI sometimes think of the hobby user and of the large corporation but forget the smaller company trying to develop a product on a tight budget and short timescale.

     

    If the CC430 is not available in module format then I am more tempted to buy a cheap ready made 433MHz transceiver module instead and attach a separate MCU.


  14. Hi all,

    I've a need for a wireless link and have decided on 433MHz so it is suitable for worldwide use. I'm planning to use the SimpliciTI protocol to avoid having to design my own protocol. I've bought a 433MHz Chronos kit to get me started quickly and that works nicely.

     

    What I now was expecting to buy were some DIP style modules with the CC430 (or similar) MCU where the RF side of things is already taken care of. I had expected something along the lines of the XBEE DIP modules (although they are 2.4GHz ZIGBEE). I can't seem to find these sort of modules - am I simply missing them?

     

    I can find low cost 433MHz modules on Farnell but I'd need a separate MCU and it would defeat the idea of using the CC430 SoC.


  15. After bashing my head off the wall a lot today, I managed to get MSPGCC4 working and that has Insight version 6.8 which seems to solve both problems - the incomplete types vanish and the mouse scroll wheel works - sorted.

     

    Having said that, I also found WinGDB today which is a Visual Studio plugin and seems very much better than Insight (more details in another post I made about it specifically).


  16. After bashing my head off the wall a lot today, I managed to get MSPGCC4 working and that comes with GDB version 6.8 which is compatible with WinGDB.

     

    I have just got WinGDB working and it looks very promising. I am now able to debug the MSP430 from within Visual Studio using all the power that Visual Studio provides (object inspection, intellisense etc).

     

    It is not free open source but the cost is just $59 which seems to be very good value indeed so I will probably go ahead and buy a licence to upgrade from the trial version.

     

    Very happy bunny ;-)


  17. While searching for answers to my Insight problem, I came across http://www.wingdb.com which is a Visual Studio add in to allow debugging via GDB.

     

    I've just tried it - it works partially in that it will talk to msp430-gdbproxy and start my code running but it will not debug. I am pretty sure this is because it is designed to work with GDB version 6.8 upwards whereas the version og GDB with MSPGCC is 5.1.1.

     

    Has anyone else had any luck with WinGDB?

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