Jump to content
43oh

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/26/2021 in Posts

  1. Forget the Arduino IDE! I would recommend using Visual Studio Code with the C/C++, Arduino and Cortex-Debug extensions. The Raspberry Pi Pico acting as programmer-debugger is called Picoprobe. It also features redirection of the Serial1 port. The installation process is detailed at the earlephilhower/arduino-pico page. You may need to build OpenOCD with specific options. It is easy and works fine. Debugging is performed from Visual Studio Code. Obviously, you can use manual command-line GDB and OpenOCD. The only caveat is Serial1 should be used instead of Serial to print to the
    1 point
  2. At USD4 apiece, you can use the second Raspberry Pi Pico as a programmer-debugger. It works really well!
    1 point
  3. Thank you for the pointer to the Challenger RP2040. It is nice to see the designers refrained from reinventing the wheel and took the Feather form-factor. Same for the LTE (SARA-R410M) or the WiFi radio (ESP8265). The Raspberry Pi Pico RP2040 is a very good board and I strongly recommend the Earle Philower's Pico core for Arduino over the official Arduino mbed-based implementation. There is a whole eco-system built around the Raspberry Pi Pico with many interesting kits. Let's me mention the E-Paper Display Pico Kit (EPDK), an all-in-one e-paper kit from Pervasive Displays.
    1 point
  4. Hi to all, are you interested in assembler language programming? if so, this could be of interest to you. the basic idea is a 5kB kernel embedded on a MSP430FRxxxx, capable of downloading source files, interpreting and compiling them. Associated with a minimalist IDE: a text editor, a generic preprocessor and a terminal to communicate with the embedded kernel. What is the craziest wish of a microcontroller programmer? In my opinion, it would be that once his source is modified, he clicks on the "build" shortcut of the editor and in a second, the program is compiled on the targ
    1 point
  5. I decided "for the hell of it" to print out the MSP430 chip family User's Guide, all 676 pages of it (slau445). Total cost was ~$70 altogether including the $10 binder from Staples. I used bestvaluecopy.com for the printing - printed in B&W, with a thicker color cover sheet, 3-hole drilled, shrink-wrapped, and put it in my own binder. Reading the more esoteric parts of the book - like the PMM, SVS and CS systems - is actually much nicer in print I found. Just more comfortable to sit down at the table and *look* at the diagrams and text and hold my left hand under the page with the
    1 point
  6. There was a mistake in the instructins. I just corrected it: http://energia.nu/guide/guide_linux/ It should be: - Open a terminal and cd to your how directory: cd ~ - unpack the energia using tar. tar -xzf <directory you downloaded Energia>/energia-0101E00XYZ-linux64.tgz To Run Energia: In a terminal cd to the directory where you have unpacked Energia. e.g. /home/username/energia-0101E00XYZ-linux64/ ./energia & Robert
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...