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jpnorair

I want to buy an awesome 3D Printer

32 posts in this topic

I think even very thin copper can't be cut with a CO2 laser. Copper is very reflective to IR. So much so that it's even used for front surface mirrors.

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This is a helpful comment, but it misses some things: you do not define what is consumer price range and you do not give an example of an "awesome" printer by your definition.  I am very curious about your opinions on those two things.

 

I don't define a consumer price range because it is difficult. :) It depends on too many factors. But see my next point, maybe that will help.

I don't give an example of an awesome printer simply because I have not seen one yet.

I have seen videos of professional 3D printers, some of them might be awesome, but they cost a lot (typically USD 15000.- and up), and it is hard to judge the awesomeness of a 3D printer from a few minutes of demo video.

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I'd like to chime in. First some background. I am a student, I do not have much money, I will pick a cheaper option that require significant setup over something that works out of the box.

 

I own both a "cheap" (<$1000) CNC and 3d printer.

Specifically a flashforge creator (based on the makerbot replicator 2), and a "3020" CNC from china. (30 x 20cm work space)

 

I have owned my 3d printer for over a year sometimes it delievers great prints, sometimes they're quite frankly terrible. There are alot of various setting and adjustments, being a cheap printer it didn't come with comprehensive instructions. Another note is that prints take A LONG TIME. So if you want to see the result from adjusting a small setting it can be very time consuming. However complex geometries are quite easy to produce on a well tuned printer.

 

 

I bought the CNC after reading through this guide. http://lcamtuf.coredump.cx/gcnc/ I reccommend if you have the time to do the same. I knew nothing about CNC machining before buying my CNC. I found a local supplier of silicone and polyurethane resins. They are more expensive per kg than ABS/PLA filiments, but likely similar cost to UV resins. I also invested in a huge slab of tooling board. 1500 x 500 x 50mm, which is very quick to machine, and has created perfect molds, with almost no wear on my tools.

The downside to the CNC is that a complex shape, i.e a simple poject box with a hole on each side requires a fair amount of 3d visulisation to seperate into parts that can be machined on a 3 axis machine. You could end up with a 4 or 5 part mold, whereas the 3d printer would just do it straight from your 3d CAD files.

 

An advantage of the cnc + molds is that polyurethanes come with a huge assortment of diffrent properties. I have cast flexible and rigid objects, even from the same mold sometimes. The ability to pigment each cast individually is a blessing and a curse, on one hand it enables colour changes by simply adding a few cents woth of pigment or dye. On the other hand getting the same shade of colour for concecutive casts can be difficult.

 

Ultimately, if this is for buisness purposes, the CNC road will create nicer looking parts. However a 3d printer esspecially something like the form 1+ might be easier for you to get started with.

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@@greeeg How do you find the 3020? I was thinking of a 3040 but since sorting out a new workshop I'm now tempted by a 6040 for the sturdier 800w water cooled spindle. I'm aware of the poor stepper wiring and drivers, but what's your overall view of the machine?

 

I'll have to hold off for now because all the UK eBay sellers of the 6040 suddenly upped their prices by

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@@greeeg How do you find the 3020? I was thinking of a 3040 but since sorting out a new workshop I'm now tempted by a 6040 for the sturdier 800w water cooled spindle. I'm aware of the poor stepper wiring and drivers, but what's your overall view of the machine?

 

I'll have to hold off for now because all the UK eBay sellers of the 6040 suddenly upped their prices by

post-274-0-52565100-1429878247_thumb.jpg

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@@greeeg

Thank you for your information.  It might be a nice side project, but I need to determine how much time I want to spent.

 

@@tingo

The stratasys printers start at US$15,000, and the users I've talked-to say they are very good at making repeatable parts.  On the other hand, I want something smaller, and I don't need to produce a lot of parts.

 

I actually visited the Form Labs office last week!  The Form 1+ is basically what I want, although I probably will want a small CNC mill in addition.  The Form 1+ can produce repeatable parts, and the quality is extremely high.  The quality is comparable to Objet prototypes I've bought in the past.  The downsides are low-speed and the fact that SLA can only use a limited amount of resins, but I think this is OK for my prototyping.

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Old thread, but I am curious about two things:

 

What was the final purchase, if any? (I may have missed this in another thread, but a quick search didn't show me)

 

and

 

Does anyone have exposure to the Carbide3D Nomad yet? They have apparently been delivering since late '14, but I have found no reviews (in several hours of reading/searching) from an actual user. Lots from the time frame of the kickstarter and just after, but nothing in the form of "I have a production model and have used it". I would love an Othermill but have no interest or need for a Mac to drive it,and am uninterested in rolling or modifying my own software. Given that I don't forsee having a suitable space for a full size mill anytime soon, and this specs to do 80% of what I need in a mill, the rest being either too large or in steel, I am intrigued.

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