RobG

Products using MSP430

98 posts in this topic

g2553 seems to be an overkill to me. ir receiver, rgb control. 4k would do fine. uart, adc left unused. may be u should add more features to it when u pick one up.

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I will pick one up just to tinker with it :smile:

That thing has an IR receiver and transmitter and it looks like they use using UART pins. ADC is probably used for a touch button.

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Ah, love these kind of threads! Anonymous Teardown Addicts anyone? :smile:

 

Jawbone UP Pedometer uses a MSP430F5548, as seen on EEVBlog: (7:30)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=sRjHAGsl6ws

 

Interestingly the fancier Nike+ Fuelband also contains a MSP430F5528, but seems to be dedicated to Bluetooth communication: (13:27)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=7xdajSS_cOU

bluehash likes this

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Talking about EEVBlog, today's teardown, the Fluke CNX3000 multimeter and wireless accessories featuring a whole bunch of MSP430's:


M430F5435A in the main unit (7:30), M430F47163 (25:26) in the first slave unit and presumably the others too. Using a CC2530F128 for communications.

 

--edited to fix broken link

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That's a cool IR transmitter. Reading the report (I think this is a school project) you can see it's quite out-dated; the references name nothing more recent than 2002.

If I'd build a similar thing nowadays there are some things I'd do different and make it significantly cheaper. First he's using the MSP430F1101A, which goes at $1.06, while an MSP430G2001 would do the thrick too and goes at $0.34.

Second, the more recent MSP430 support pull-up to be configured in I/O lines, so that saves us 5 resistors (and reduces component placing to single sided, this saves a lot of money in real production).

The 10-pin 0.5mm pitch zif socket (ouch, pricey!) for JTAG can be replaced by a 0.05" pitch quartet of holes, allowing programming with spy-bi-wire.

For some reason he uses a FET to power his LED, I don't think that's necessary at all.

He uses 2x 1uF + 10nF power decoupling on a battery, I think a single capacitor would do the trick at well. (but we need another 2.2nF capacitor on RST).

He estimates his fobs at a price of about $21,- of which $11,- are for PCB manufacturing, at current prices you could easily go to $3,-, then $2,- for the casing, fine with me, and the components would go at.... well.... the battery and battery clip, plus a few cents. I think a "remake" would go for under 7$, cutting the price in three!

gsutton likes this

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Two of the three latest "fitness" devices have been mentioned above, Jawbone Up and Nike Fuelband. Here is the third one, Fitbit Ultra using F5419A.

 

http://www.edn.com/design/medical/4395806/High-res-pressure-sensor-brings-stair-track-capability-to-Fitbit-Ultra

 

Unfortunately the MSP430 has been replaced by a STM32L in there latest products Fitbit One and Zip.

 

http://www.theverge.com/2012/9/17/3340728/fitbit-one-and-zip-hands-on-and-press-image-gallery

roadrunner84 likes this

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Another device with MSP430 on EEVblog, Atten PPS3205T-3S Triple Output Power Supply uses MSP430F2013 (29:45).

bluehash likes this

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Two of the three latest "fitness" devices have been mentioned above, Jawbone Up and Nike Fuelband. Here is the third one, Fitbit Ultra using F5419A.

 

http://www.edn.com/design/medical/4395806/High-res-pressure-sensor-brings-stair-track-capability-to-Fitbit-Ultra

 

Unfortunately the MSP430 has been replaced by a STM32L in there latest products Fitbit One and Zip.

 

http://www.theverge.com/2012/9/17/3340728/fitbit-one-and-zip-hands-on-and-press-image-gallery

 

The Jawbone UP is a shambolic piece of work.  After seeing the teardown, I would never buy one.  Nike Fuelband also uses MSP430, though, so it's nothing against the 430.

 

Nike has a long history with the MSP430.  The Nike Fit / Nike Plus widgets have used MSP430 since the beginning.  That alone is probably more volume than AVR has, total.

 

STM32L is cheaper than the MSP430 parts of similar spec, which is most likely the reason why it got selected.  I am also using STM32L151C8 in a product.  It is a great MCU, I must say.  I still love the CC430, though.

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The Jawbone UP is a shambolic piece of work.  After seeing the teardown, I would never buy one.

 

Could you elaborate more on what

post-30789-0-91587900-1363852131_thumb.jpg

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This one is literally making my day since a while ago.

It's an alarm clock controlled by your sleep phase.

When I first heard of this I thought it's just another way of alarm clock with better advertisement.

Anyway I tried the same technique with "Sleep as Android" and couldn't really believe it works as good as it did. Waking and getting up was much easier.

So I bought the AXBO sleep phase alarm clock.

http://www.axbo.com

 

I also found a blog entry about messing with the internals.

http://www.openbeacon.org/Openbeacon_Axbo

 

Didn't even know it uses a 430 until then. Even better on the version for 2 people they use 3 430s :-)

An MSP430F436 in the clock and a MSP430F1101A in each of the transmitters.

I already bought one of these NRF24 boards on ebay to mess with it a bit. Let's see what comes out of this.

bluehash likes this

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It looks like it must have something to do with the NFC.  I'm kind-of amazed they dedicated two chips to NFC, but I like it (I love NFC).

 

Anyway, they must be off-loading a lot of the NFC/NDEF functionality to the 5259.  Otherwise, there would be no reason to use a chip so big.  I have an NDEF server that runs comfortably on the CC430 (4KB), along with a lot of other stuff, so with 32KB RAM I guess they must be buffering the *entire* transaction on the MSP.  Considering the Moto X is designed to maximize battery runtime, I get it -- minimize trips to the big CPU.  That said, I'm still kind-of surprised they couldn't negotiate a SoC or SiP.

 

On a related note, if you don't have quite so demanding needs for your NFC app, and you want an MSP430, do check out the new RF430 parts from TI!  They are FR parts with FRAM, so pretty darn impressive.

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