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yyrkoon

Logic Analyzers

34 posts in this topic

i thought all those clones didn't have any logic buffers and are limited to 5v max? How is that going to work 20v signals?

There is a logic level converter between the bus and where the MSP430 will be. There has to be, otherwise how would the MSP430 survive ?

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Weighing in.... I purchased the 8 channel Saleae a while back when they offered the 43oh community a $25 discount. Didn't have a use for it at the time but since then it has saved me significant time and a lot of aggravation. The hardware is excellent but I feel the major strength is in their software. Overall, it is a superb product that I would highly recommend to anyone.

 

However, the clones that leverage the Saleae software concern me. If everyone were to buy these clones then Saleae would likely go under or have to invest money in their hardware/software to block the hardware clone vendors. They would probably have to add crypto to the hardware which, in turn, would increase the cost of their product to all their customers.

 

Perhaps I am in the minority anymore, but I don't buy knockoff hardware even though in the short term the lower pricing can be very attractive. In the long term I would be supporting companies that can take a product that has already been engineered by someone else, offer little to no support, typically use substandard components, and then sell it at a much lower cost. Adding to that I would be supporting the economies of countries that are potentially hostile to us.

 

EDIT:  Should have read @@zeke 's post first as what I was surmising is real time reality:

 

I'm "on the fence" in this sort of situation where it could be argued about "ripping off good companies". Because . . .How do we know this company didn't rip off some developer somewhere for this software ? Maybe they hired a rent-a-coder developer and paid them a really cheap fee to write the software. Not only that, there is a well known open sourced software project who supports all their hardware( Saleae ) with Sigrok.

 

Companies like Saleae, and Segger are notorious for charging for too much money for their products. But has anyone actually done a tear down on a Saleae 16 Pro to see what all is in this tiny plastic box ? $550 is far too much money, unless this tiny box is filled with gold. As far as the software goes, don't need it. You've got Sigrok. Maybe next time instead of "sticking it" to their customer base, they'll wise up, and pay a Sigrok developer a fraction of the money they probably claim they've spent on their software. To work on making their hardware, the best it can be in Sigrok.

 

Anyway, my point is. There is more than one way of looking at things.

 

As for the "hostile country" *thing*. This is the way of the world, and has been for the last several thousand years. There is not a single country in this world that does not hold it's land by force of their military. We just have to remember that Governments, no matter whose government is made up of elitist idiots that try to force their will onto their own citizens. This crappy government we now "enjoy" does not even come close to representing me. So it would not be too much of a stretch to imagine that people in another country have to suffer their own political idiots as well . . .

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@@yyrkoon

 

Joe and his brother built the company from the ground up. Their software was written in house. Their product is top notch. They are good people.

 

EEVBlog has done a teardown.

 

And another one here.

 

If the Saleae isn't your cup of tea then maybe you might like the Open bench Logic Sniffer instead?

dubnet, yyrkoon, greeeg and 1 other like this

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Companies like Saleae, and Segger are notorious for charging for too much money for their products.

 

I would say that for a typical application the cost COULD pay itself off VERY quickly with time saved debugging. Of course it does depend on what you do. Often hobbyist/small commercial projects that's not so true.

 

I personally have a OpenBench Logic Sniffer. (Which is compatible with Sigrok) I've really only used it a handful of times, The best example from my use case was reverse engineering an old B/W LCD module that I wanted to use in my project. But typically I'm much more productive with a Scope. (But of course limited to 4 channels.)

yyrkoon likes this

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@@yyrkoon

 

Joe and his brother built the company from the ground up. Their software was written in house. Their product is top notch. They are good people.

 

EEVBlog has done a teardown.

 

And another one here.

 

If the Saleae isn't your cup of tea then maybe you might like the Open bench Logic Sniffer instead?

I really needed it yesterday. SO I asked here, then did an internet search too. So I did not want to spend a huge amount of time, or money to buy something I may only use once. When looking short term, what I bought seemed to be the best option for the money. The Open Bench AL at first glance seemed to be less optimal for my usage. When I first read about the Open Bench, there seemed to be a few caveats when used with sigrok. I also did not know at that time it could be bought from element14 for $45 . . . I was under the impression it was a complete DiY build.

 

Granted the one I ordered *is* coming on a slow boat from China. It's supposedly been shipped already, but no idea when it will actually arrive here.

 

As for the potential nefarious activities they engage in with software . . . I won't be using it. I'll be using sigrok. Which I already have installed.

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You'll find a use for it soon enough.

Maybe . . .

 

SO the reason why i needed this was to observe / debug DALI packets outgoing from my controller. Now, we've changed our project slightly to use std UART for the communications instead. Technically I could also use it to observe RS232 / RS485 packets, but I do not think it'll be necessary. Perhaps on the remote end to check for noise or errors. As we still plan on doing serial over distance.

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I wasn't implying it was necessarily for this project. I think a logic analyser is pretty much essential for debugging anything when doing microcontroller work. Once it's too complex to use an LED - e.g. any serial protocols, timing, clocks - it'll likely be the first tool you turn to.

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